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Mtotheb81

Advice on where to live in Queensland!

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    Hi Guys 

    We are seriously considering moving to Brisbane/Sunshine Coast but are a bit lost in terms of where to move. 

    We are looking for great junior and High schools, ideally state but open to private. Ideally somewhere not to isolated but not too busy! The dream is to be close to the sea but willing to travel 1hr to go to the beach. Want to avoid the Gold Coast. 

    Our main concern is everywhere we look in Brisbane and Sunshine Coast has flood risks! We did think of Buderim but it seems very sleepy which I’m not sure will be good for teenagers. We also looked at Red cliff but seems a bit isolated and run down. Do you guys have any ideas? Thanks for your time!

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    Moneycorp

    Moneycorp

    Where will you be working? That’s usually the starting point.

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    Where will you be working? That’s usually the starting point.

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    I will be self employed as a personal trainer. My partner will be working as a nurse. So ideally need to be somewhere where I can attract a lot of clients. 

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    Perhaps worth a look at places like Cleveland or Manly/Wynnum unless you are set on north of the river.


    Timeline: 309/100 Sent 7/8/13, Money Taken 9/8/13, CO appointed 3/9/13. Med 3/12/13. Police check 4/12/13. VISA GRANTED 8/4/14, Subclass100. Recce August 2014. Arrived 30 July 2015.

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    Excellent! Thanks for the advice. Is it better to live north of the river? What are those places like in terms of flooding? 

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    6 hours ago, Mtotheb81 said:

    Excellent! Thanks for the advice. Is it better to live north of the river? What are those places like in terms of flooding? 

    Flooding can vary from street to street. Look at the Brisbane City Council website, they have excellent flood maps, almost down to looking at individual properrties.

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    On 03/10/2017 at 22:44, Gbye grey sky said:

    Perhaps worth a look at places like Cleveland or Manly/Wynnum unless you are set on north of the river.

    North of the river........where the sun always shines:D


    Thames Migration appointed Jun 12 and 189 Visa granted Jan 13:wink:. Landed Sep 14 and roots being quickly established. Brisbane, what an amazing place with incredible opportunity.

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    Thanks guys. I have been looking at Wishart as an area, it has great schools but $$$!!! Also Mansfield looks good for schools... any advice on these areas? 

    Where are the areas to avoid. I heard Brizzy has a lot of dreaded ‘Bogans!’

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    On 04/10/2017 at 05:59, Nemesis said:

    Flooding can vary from street to street. Look at the Brisbane City Council website, they have excellent flood maps, almost down to looking at individual properrties.

    https://www.brisbane.qld.gov.au/community-safety/community-safety/disasters-emergencies/be-prepared/flooding-brisbane/flood-awareness-map

    Anywhere in Redland City is clear of floods from Birkdale south.  Part of what attracted us to the area.


    Timeline: 309/100 Sent 7/8/13, Money Taken 9/8/13, CO appointed 3/9/13. Med 3/12/13. Police check 4/12/13. VISA GRANTED 8/4/14, Subclass100. Recce August 2014. Arrived 30 July 2015.

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      • By The Pom Queen
         
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        Noosaville
        Noosaville is a 5 minute drive from Hastings Street or you can travel on the ferry from the Marina.
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        51.4% of the people living in Noosaville over the age of 15 and who identify as being in the labour force are employed full time, 37.2% are working on a part time basis. Noosaville has an unemployment rate of 6.5%. 
        The main occupations of people living in Noosaville are 17.6% Managers, 16.9% Professionals, 14.6% Sales workers, 14.1% Technicians & trades workers, 12.2% Clerical & administrative workers, 9.7% Community & personal service workers, 9.4% Labourers, 4.1% Machinery operators & drivers, 1.4% Occupation inadequately described/ Not stated.
        The main industries people from Noosaville work in are 16.6% Accommodation and food services, 14.9% Retail trade, 10.8% Health care and social assistance, 9.0% Construction, 6.2% Professional, scientific and technical services, 5.3% Manufacturing, 5.3% Education and training, 4.0% Rental, hiring and real estate services, 3.9% Administrative and support services.
        37.1% of homes are fully owned, and 23.5% are in the process of being purchased by home loan mortgage. 33.4% of homes are rented.
        The median individual income is $527 per week and the median household income is $934 per week.
        The median rent in Noosaville is $350 per week and the median mortgage repayment is $2000 per month.

         
      • By Cerberus1

         
        CENSUS 2016 – OUR BRISBANE

        Brisbane’s LGA population has grown by 1.7 per cent per annum on average over the past five years, in line with the national average.
        This increase in population is mostly attributed to continued growth in outer suburbs such as Taigum, Fitzgibbon, Rochedale and Burbank, but also reflects the increasing growth in inner city suburbs such as Bowen Hills, Newstead and Fortitude Valley.
        Brisbane’s population growth has also been supported by migration. The number of overseas born residents, particularly from China and India, as well as a host of other Asian nations, has increased.
        The proportion of Brisbane LGA residents born overseas increased from 28.3 per cent in 2011 to 30.6 per cent in 2016.
        Although the United Kingdom and New Zealand remain the most common overseas nations of birth, this proportion has decreased.

        Language diversity in the city has increased with the shift in migration. The most commonly spoken languages other than English are Mandarin, Vietnamese and Cantonese.

        AGE
        Brisbane’s median age has increased slightly from 34 to 35, due to a 16.6 per cent increase in the number of residents older than 65.
         
        EDUCATION
        The proportion of residents who have completed high school has increased from 69.5 per cent to 72 per cent.
        There has also been an increase in the number of residents attending universities from 81,000 to 97,800.

        HOUSEHOLD INCOME
        Brisbane’s median personal and household income continued to increase between 2011 and 2016, by 10.6 per cent and 13.4 per cent respectively.
        Median personal income in the Brisbane LGA is $770 per week, which is higher than the median income for Australia, Queensland and Greater Brisbane.

         
        HOUSING COSTS
        The median mortgage repayment decreased in the Brisbane LGA, as interest rates reached record lows.
        As a result, housing affordability has improved, with the proportion of household income spent on rent and mortgage repayments decreasing.

        Improved rental affordability has occurred at the same time as the proportion of renters in the Brisbane LGA has increased, which in part reflects an increase in the proportion of people living in apartments.
        The average household size in the Brisbane LGA remained unchanged between 2011 and 2016 with the growth in occupied dwellings in line with population growth.

        INTERNET CONNECTIVITY
        Greater Brisbane has retained its position as the most internet connected of the state capitals.
        The proportion of dwellings with an internet connection increased further between 2011 and 2016, from 78.6 per cent to 82.4 per cent in Greater Brisbane (84 per cent of dwellings are connected in the Brisbane LGA).
        EMPLOYMENT

         

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