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chris&josh

143 visa applicant with Parkinson's disease

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Hi there,

I'm desperately seeking information/advises relating to my situation. 

We applied 143 contributory parent visa for my dad. My dad suffers Parkinson's disease for 8 years. He is 73 years old, and probably on the stage 2 of the disease which has 5 stages. That means that despite some symptoms, he is dependent and able to complete normal physical tasks. However, we start to worry that if his medical condition could be a problem for him gaining the visa. If you could share any information, experience or advices, it would be much appreciated.

Thanks

Chris

 

 

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I would speak to a good specialist agent as a progressive illness is a major issue as the department do not just look at how he is now but also in the future. George Lombard is a migration agent who specializes in visas with medical issues

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1 hour ago, chris&josh said:

Hi VERYSTOMY,

Thank you so much for your rapid reply. I think I will seek help from specialist. Do you recon my dad still have good chance to gain the visa with specialist's help? Sorry, I know my question sounds a bit silly. I'm bit depressed worrying about this problem. I'm desperately looking for some encouraging signs/comments.

Chris

 

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1 hour ago, VERYSTORMY said:

I would speak to a good specialist agent as a progressive illness is a major issue as the department do not just look at how he is now but also in the future. George Lombard is a migration agent who specializes in visas with medical issues

Hi VERYSTOMY,

Thank you so much for your rapid reply. I think I will seek help from specialist. Do you recon my dad still have good chance to gain the visa with specialist's help? Sorry, I know my question sounds a bit silly. I'm bit depressed worrying about this problem. I'm desperately looking for some encouraging signs/comments.

Chris

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I would have to be honest and say it is a major issue. The government looks at what the possible costs are of a medical issue and there is a limit. If it believes that a medical condition will result in significant costs, then it is likely to refuse. Given that his condition is one which will worsen over time and which is likely to see large costs in care, then I can see a major issue. However, George will be the man to speak to and if there is a way round, he will be the one that knows. Best of luck

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2 minutes ago, VERYSTORMY said:

I would have to be honest and say it is a major issue. The government looks at what the possible costs are of a medical issue and there is a limit. If it believes that a medical condition will result in significant costs, then it is likely to refuse. Given that his condition is one which will worsen over time and which is likely to see large costs in care, then I can see a major issue. However, George will be the man to speak to and if there is a way round, he will be the one that knows. Best of luck

Thank you VERYSTOMY.

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It is a shame that you didn't get the advice from an expert like @Alan Collett  before proceeding. If it was my parent I would have brought them over on a holiday and then applied for the 804 visa https://www.border.gov.au/Trav/Visa-1/804- once they were here. This means they stay in Australia until the visa decision is made. Yes there are risks with this, one that they may have received a "no further stay" condition on the entry visa and the other is that when the medical is requested he would fail, however the visa times on an 804 use to be around 30 years so if it was my mum I would take the risk thinking that she will have passed away peacefully with her family before that time comes.

As you have already applied for the visa, I don't think you can risk it now that's even if the 804 is still available. @Alan Collett Is the expert in parent Visas and @George Lombard is the expert in health related issues.

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If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present.

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If the 143 is only in the queue you have options, as TPQ has said above you need to speak to an agent urgently to understand appropriate strategy.

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3 hours ago, The Pom Queen said:

It is a shame that you didn't get the advice from an expert like @Alan Collett  before proceeding. If it was my parent I would have brought them over on a holiday and then applied for the 804 visa https://www.border.gov.au/Trav/Visa-1/804- once they were here. This means they stay in Australia until the visa decision is made. Yes there are risks with this, one that they may have received a "no further stay" condition on the entry visa and the other is that when the medical is requested he would fail, however the visa times on an 804 use to be around 30 years so if it was my mum I would take the risk thinking that she will have passed away peacefully with her family before that time comes.

As you have already applied for the visa, I don't think you can risk it now that's even if the 804 is still available. @Alan Collett Is the expert in parent Visas and @George Lombard is the expert in health related issues.

The big issue though would be medical complications as they would only get reciprocal rather than full medicare and for older people with known medical issues that could be a massive issue. Reciprocal doesn't cover everything. It is basically there to keep you alive until you can get home. It wouldn't for example cover in home care which the OP's father may very well need as the illness progresses.

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10 minutes ago, VERYSTORMY said:

The big issue though would be medical complications as they would only get reciprocal rather than full medicare and for older people with known medical issues that could be a massive issue. Reciprocal doesn't cover everything. It is basically there to keep you alive until you can get home. It wouldn't for example cover in home care which the OP's father may very well need as the illness progresses.

That would be my concern too that during the wait there would be massive potential health costs.


I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

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3 hours ago, The Pom Queen said:

It is a shame that you didn't get the advice from an expert like @Alan Collett  before proceeding. If it was my parent I would have brought them over on a holiday and then applied for the 804 visa https://www.border.gov.au/Trav/Visa-1/804- once they were here. This means they stay in Australia until the visa decision is made. Yes there are risks with this, one that they may have received a "no further stay" condition on the entry visa and the other is that when the medical is requested he would fail, however the visa times on an 804 use to be around 30 years so if it was my mum I would take the risk thinking that she will have passed away peacefully with her family before that time comes.

As you have already applied for the visa, I don't think you can risk it now that's even if the 804 is still available. @Alan Collett Is the expert in parent Visas and @George Lombard is the expert in health related issues.

Thank you so much for your information. 

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33 minutes ago, VERYSTORMY said:

The big issue though would be medical complications as they would only get reciprocal rather than full medicare and for older people with known medical issues that could be a massive issue. Reciprocal doesn't cover everything. It is basically there to keep you alive until you can get home. It wouldn't for example cover in home care which the OP's father may very well need as the illness progresses.

Thanks again verystormy. I have a great fear that my father's visa get refused due to his medical condition. I will contact the expert which you and TPQ recommended. Thank you.

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35 minutes ago, ali said:

That would be my concern too that during the wait there would be massive potential health costs.

Thanks for your comments Ali.

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I wish you the best of luck @chris&josh please keep us updated. 


If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present.

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1 hour ago, VERYSTORMY said:

The big issue though would be medical complications as they would only get reciprocal rather than full medicare and for older people with known medical issues that could be a massive issue. Reciprocal doesn't cover everything. It is basically there to keep you alive until you can get home. It wouldn't for example cover in home care which the OP's father may very well need as the illness progresses.

Could they take out health insurance if they were on a bridging visa? I've literally no idea, I'm just trying to think outside the box so to speak. I also found out this evening that @Richard Gregan deals with medical issues and I'm sure he said he had some doctors on board who can advise. 


If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present.

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7 minutes ago, The Pom Queen said:

Could they take out health insurance if they were on a bridging visa? I've literally no idea, I'm just trying to think outside the box so to speak. I also found out this evening that @Richard Gregan deals with medical issues and I'm sure he said he had some doctors on board who can advise. 

Health insurance for non residents is expensive and you would need to read the small print to ensure it covers costs such as in home care and mobility aids. These are not normally standard inclusions.

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30 minutes ago, ScottieGirl said:

Health insurance for non residents is expensive and you would need to read the small print to ensure it covers costs such as in home care and mobility aids. These are not normally standard inclusions.

Thanks Hun x


If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present.

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As mentioned health insurance is very expensive for temporary non residents, we pay $10.000 yearly per couple for top cover, and it has gone up incredibly over the last 2 years. 42% the year before last and another 10% this year.

The comparable insurance cost if you are a PR is half of ours.

Also existing conditions are difficult to get cover for, and you have to pass the medical for the visa.

I will read our cover through to see if it covers mobility aid etc.,

We aren't entitled to Medicare on our visa, so I have no idea what help you might get on a bridging visa.

 

 

 

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Health insurance also tends to exclude pre-existing conditions so it's quite possible that any expenses related to treatment of his Parkinsons would be ineligible.

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It would almost certainly be excluded in the travel insurance and this will be a big problem regarding the visa as that means any costs relating to it will have to be met by Australia 

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On 12/09/2017 at 22:16, chris&josh said:

Thanks for your comments Ali.

Hi Chris and Josh, 

I'm currently in a very similar situation. Just wondering how did you go and if you have any advise at all.

 

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On 11/09/2017 at 22:34, chris&josh said:

Hi there,

I'm desperately seeking information/advises relating to my situation. 

We applied 143 contributory parent visa for my dad. My dad suffers Parkinson's disease for 8 years. He is 73 years old, and probably on the stage 2 of the disease which has 5 stages. That means that despite some symptoms, he is dependent and able to complete normal physical tasks. However, we start to worry that if his medical condition could be a problem for him gaining the visa. If you could share any information, experience or advices, it would be much appreciated.

Thanks

Chris

 

 

Hi Chris&Josh,

i am in a similar situation as yours and would like to hear what approach you took and if it is possible to bring a parent with Parkinson’s to Australia. Thank you so much! Hoping to hear from you.

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1 hour ago, Misha said:

Hi Chris&Josh,

i am in a similar situation as yours and would like to hear what approach you took and if it is possible to bring a parent with Parkinson’s to Australia. Thank you so much! Hoping to hear from you.

The OP hasn't been on the forum for over a year. 

The advice would be the same. Speak to a specialist migration agent such as George Lombard

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