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How friendly is perth

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    Depends what type of person you are, I have a very dry sense of humor that fitted perfectly with the Irish in my case and with the English. I did not dislike Aussies but found they were not good listeners but most only wanted to tell me their stories and their situations. Have made loads of good English Irish and Scottish friends but just could not say the same about aussies, there is a click over there and for Brits I imagine it is harder to break than a saffa. They do like to keep themselves to themselves.


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    9 hours ago, Perthbum said:

    Depends what type of person you are, I have a very dry sense of humor that fitted perfectly with the Irish in my case and with the English. I did not dislike Aussies but found they were not good listeners but most only wanted to tell me their stories and their situations. Have made loads of good English Irish and Scottish friends but just could not say the same about aussies, there is a click over there and for Brits I imagine it is harder to break than a saffa. They do like to keep themselves to themselves.

    I notice that as well. We had a number of Irish households at one time in my neighbourhood, now rapidly declining with the downturn, only a the odd occasion did I ever hear an Aussie accent within any of these groups when they had a bbq or craic outside. Almost never.

    Aussies keep pretty much to themselves in my experience as yours, something not always apparent to those that meet Aussies abroad, whom often appear louder and more out going.

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