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simmo

How is Trump doing so far?

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5 hours ago, Rallyman said:

Genuine question, what has trump done that personal effects you , that you hate him so much ? 
I am not a fan of his but don’t hate him like some on here although if I had to vote for him or Hilary, I would vote for him as the Best of a bad choice.

His rating is going up and is very popular with the Americans another 4 years in office ? 

My post was actually about Bernie Sanders because I was responding to a poster who thought Bernie’s policy of providing medical care to all Americans was brainless so how did you make this quantum leap?

Trump has done nothing that personally affects me so far as I am aware.  Indeed I actively try to avoid listening to him these days (not easy) as, to put it bluntly, when I do hear him speak or see one of his tweets I find him almost unintelligible as I only speak English, not gibberish.

I would have been unable to vote for him or for Hillary if I was American in 2016.  I would perhaps have been a Jill Stein voter in that scenario or would have sided with the majority of Americans who stayed away and effectively said ‘none of the above’.

Just hope that there is a better option for the American people in 2020.

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6 minutes ago, Gbye grey sky said:

Just hope that there is a better option for the American people in 2020.

There is only one politician who can reliably deny Donald Trump re-election as president in November. That politician is not to be found in the throng of political pygmies and fading never-quite-weres in the still-crowded field of Democratic Party contenders.

The only politician who can really stop Trump is Trump.

The President’s unique and sometimes volatile mixture of actually delivering on his promises, strong nationalism, earthy persona, cut-through attack lines and unpredictable showmanship this week looked a winning combination on every score.

 

Excuse this lamest of puns, but the week certainly came up trumps for Donald.

He has not had, politically, a better week in his presidency. The Democrats have not had a worse week. They looked grossly incompetent in Iowa, they remain fragmented and divided ideologically with no frontrunner, they looked petty when Nancy Pelosi tore up her copy of Trump’s State of the Union speech — perhaps the best speech of his presidency — and they went down to wholly deserved ignominious defeat in the ridiculous impeachment trial.

 
 
 
 
REUTERS1:18

Tearing up speech 'completely, entirely appropriate': Pelosi

 
U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Thursday defended her decision to tear up what she said wasn't a State of the Union speech, but President Trump's "manifesto of mistruths."
 
player

The Democrats, much more than Trump, have debauched the constitution by so manifestly misusing it in this impeachment charade. One of the two charges against Trump was that he obstructed congress — meaning he wouldn’t surrender certain documents and allow some officials to testify.

These matters, for which there is endless precedent, could have been easily adjudicated in a court when the House of Representatives was holding its impeachment hearings. But the Democrats didn’t take it to court. So the President is supposed to be hurled from office and the 2016 election result annulled, the first time such a thing has happened in US history, for a routine administrative matter that was readily open to court ­adjudication?

Gimme a break.

The greater charge against Trump was that he withheld aid to Ukraine to pressure it into launching an investigation into Joe Biden and his son Hunter Biden.

Trump did broadly urge such an investigation in his conversation with the Ukraine president. There was a sliver of connection to an existing, authorised, separate US Justice Department investigation. But any way you cut it, it was a tacky, unbecoming, unpresidential, even dishonourable thing for Trump to do.

Pete Buttigieg, the Democrats’ apparent winner in Iowa. Picture: AFP Pete Buttigieg, the Democrats’ apparent winner in Iowa. Picture: AFP

It does not remotely resemble, barely exists even in the same universe as, one of the “high crimes and misdemeanours” that would justify impeachment and removal from office.

Washington Republicans have not been very popular these past few years. According to the polls, they are now substantially more popular than the Democrats.

This is because the Democrats’ impeachment arguments are so intrinsically unreasonable and disproportionate. High-profile former presidential candidate senator Lindsey Graham demonstrated just how easy it is for the Republicans to make the argument when he said: “They (Democrats) were going to impeach the President because there was a small delay in aid to Ukraine to leverage an investigation into a political opponent. No investigation took place and the aid flowed. And on this basis they were going to deprive the American people of their election choice?”

As the impeachment process has unfolded, public support for it has declined and Trump’s approval ratings have risen. Gallup, whose polls normally are not at the pro-Trump end of the polling spectrum, reports Trump’s overall approval rating at 49 per cent. His approval as an economic manager is a staggering 64 per cent.

Trump was able to boast in his State of the Union speech that he has delivered the “great American revival” that he promised as a ­candidate.

Unemployment is at its lowest rate in more than 50 years. The Federal Reserve forecasts economic growth in the US this year of 2 per cent, down a little from last year but still a leading result among developed nations. Trump has just concluded a so-called “phase one” trade deal with China. Beijing has promised to buy $US200bn ($297.8bn) more in US exports. This deal is an affront to the principles of free trade and Beijing has a long record of never actually buying the dollar sums it notionally commits to in headline trade agreements. But Beijing wants peace, even a temporary peace, with Trump and the Chinese will surely buy a lot of US farm goods this year.

Trump’s economic achievements are substantial. He has cut taxes and deregulated business. Under his presidency the US has created seven million new jobs, vastly more than anyone forecast when he was elected. The key minorities — African-Americans, Hispanics and Asian-Americans — are experiencing record low ­unemployment rates.

Trump has delivered to some extent for the minorities who voted against him. And he has delivered for the working class. There is a boom in blue-collar jobs and blue-collar wages.

It is true, of course, that all this is being purchased, in part, with debt and deficit that are surely unsustainable. In so far as Trump has an approach to national debt, it is for the US economy to grow its way out of the debt.

The US Senate votes against impeachment. Picture: AP The US Senate votes against impeachment. Picture: AP

But any president would claim the credit for these overall economic figures.

Trump is delivering on other promises. He is building his wall with Mexico. He is asserting control over US borders. In his State of the Union speech he spoke against illegal immigration but in favour of legal immigration. He didn’t mention Australia by name in this speech but he once more proposed an Australian-style immigration system, where immigrants are chosen for skills and for the contribution they can make to America.

Under Bill Clinton and Barack Obama the Democrats were in favour, at least rhetorically, of asserting control over US borders and preventing or discouraging illegal immigrants. Under Obama, the US arrested and deported hundreds of thousands of illegal immigrants. That most of the left and progressive side of the Democratic Party now effectively promotes open borders, and even Democratic centrists oppose any actual measure to control borders, shows just how far left the Democrats have moved.

This move leftwards has secular and even global causes. But it is also exacerbated by the disorienting effect Trump has on his opponents, the famous Trump derangement syndrome. He drives them nuts. Many Australian commentators suffer from this condition. Tim Costello, in a bizarre recent piece, argued that merely opposing the idea that Trump should be removed from office between elections constituted being “a religious standard-bearer for Trump”.

This betrays a representative left-of-centre moral disorder in which anyone who doesn’t embrace relentless, undiscriminating hatred of Trump and all his works is condemned as morally and ethically unworthy, a slave to atavistic prejudices and irrational hatreds.

Some of Trump’s moves on immigration have been excessive and unconscionable, such as the brief period when children were forcibly separated from their parents at the border. Evangelical leaders, among Trump’s strongest backers, condemned him for this and he quickly changed.

But there is no doubt most Americans, including most immigrants, want the US to control its borders. If the Democrats nominate a far-left candidate who preaches open borders, they both offend common sense and handicap themselves in the election. Trump must be hoping the Democrats go down this path.

The State of the Union speech contained serious bids for Hispanic and black votes. If Trump were to wins 40 per cent of Hispanics and 20 per cent of African-Americans he would almost certainly be re-elected.

Other things Trump said were worth listening to as well. He hailed in the audience a mother and her beautiful two-year-old daughter. This little girl was born after 21 weeks’ gestation. Surely at 21 weeks, and certainly at 22 weeks, she was a human being. If you believe human beings have universal human rights surely she enjoyed human rights at 22 weeks. Do other babies also enjoy human rights at 22 weeks? What does that say about the human rights dimension of late-term abortions?

There was no audible booing when Trump was talking of this little girl. To boo Trump then would have meant Democrats booing the mother and her daughter. This was a dignified and powerful part of Trump’s speech. No president has ever raised this issue in this way before. It is not surprising that people who regard such issues as important think there is some value in Trump’s presidency.

The State of the Union speech had one pure Trump innovation in communications. Presidents since Ronald Reagan have been hailing designated audience members as exemplifying particular political or civic virtues. But Trump went further. He gave one little girl a scholarship. He allegedly surprised one military wife by bringing her husband home to her there and then. He promoted one proud African-American military ­veter­an, age 100, to the rank of general. What can the Democrats do about all this?

They can’t run on the economy. Impeachment was a farce. They will run on Trump’s character, which a lot of Americans don’t like, but Americans have got used to Trump by now. The big recent rise in Trump’s approval rating has come from increases in approval among the growing share of the population who call themselves Republicans, and an increase in approval among independents, which is surely based on the ­economy.

If the Democrats end up, in Bernie Sanders, with a self- ­described socialist preaching revolution who wants to throw open the borders, abolish private health insurance and de-industrialise the nation in the interests of climate change, they will make Trump very, very hard to beat.

But November is a long way away and anything can happen. At time of writing it looks like Pete Buttigieg, the former small-city mayor from the mid-west, has just won Iowa. Sanders is likely to win New Hampshire next week. After New Hampshire comes Nevada and then South Carolina.

Iowa, New Hampshire and Nevada don’t select many delegates but they confer, or destroy, momentum. Joe Biden, the establishment favourite who in notional polls does best against Trump among all the Democrats, finished a humiliating fourth in Iowa.

No one has won the presidency without finishing first or second in their party’s primary in New Hampshire. Biden is favoured in South Carolina because he has inherited goodwill from African-American Democrats after eight years serving with Barack Obama. Four different Democrats could each win one of the first four ­primaries.

After Nevada comes a huge slew of states in Super Tuesday on March 3 and more than 1300 nominating conference delegates. By then, former New York mayor Mich­ael Bloomberg, with billions of dollars at his disposal, will be making his maximum run.

The Democrats could just about find themselves in a divided nominating conference, with no one having a majority and a brokered outcome. The longer the process goes on the more fiercely the Democrats will fight and damage each other.

Mayor Pete, as Buttigieg is called, is certainly the shiny new winner. He is a centrist, very likeable, a mid-westerner, a military veteran, and young and good-looking. He is openly gay but doesn’t wallow in identity politics. Hopefully his sexual orientation has no effect one way or the other.

If Biden collapses would Buttigieg or Bloomberg inherit his support as the most electable ­centrist? American politics can always surprise you. Neither Clinton, nor Obama, or Trump himself was considered likely to win his party’s nomination, much less the presidency, when their respective primaries began.

Trump may yet be like NSW in a State of Origin rugby league match leading by 10 points at half time. Don’t take anything for granted.

Then again, it’s always better to be winning.

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Greg Sheridan, The Australian's foreign editor, is one of the nation's most influential national security commentators, who is active across television and radio and also writes extensively on culture. He has w... Read more
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I want it all, and I want it now.

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33 minutes ago, Parley said:

There is only one politician who can reliably deny Donald Trump re-election as president in November. That politician is not to be found in the throng of political pygmies and fading never-quite-weres in the still-crowded field of Democratic Party contenders.

The only politician who can really stop Trump is Trump.

The President’s unique and sometimes volatile mixture of actually delivering on his promises, strong nationalism, earthy persona, cut-through attack lines and unpredictable showmanship this week looked a winning combination on every score.

 

Excuse this lamest of puns, but the week certainly came up trumps for Donald.

He has not had, politically, a better week in his presidency. The Democrats have not had a worse week. They looked grossly incompetent in Iowa, they remain fragmented and divided ideologically with no frontrunner, they looked petty when Nancy Pelosi tore up her copy of Trump’s State of the Union speech — perhaps the best speech of his presidency — and they went down to wholly deserved ignominious defeat in the ridiculous impeachment trial.

 
 
 
 
REUTERS1:18

Tearing up speech 'completely, entirely appropriate': Pelosi

 
U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Thursday defended her decision to tear up what she said wasn't a State of the Union speech, but President Trump's "manifesto of mistruths."
 
player

The Democrats, much more than Trump, have debauched the constitution by so manifestly misusing it in this impeachment charade. One of the two charges against Trump was that he obstructed congress — meaning he wouldn’t surrender certain documents and allow some officials to testify.

These matters, for which there is endless precedent, could have been easily adjudicated in a court when the House of Representatives was holding its impeachment hearings. But the Democrats didn’t take it to court. So the President is supposed to be hurled from office and the 2016 election result annulled, the first time such a thing has happened in US history, for a routine administrative matter that was readily open to court ­adjudication?

Gimme a break.

The greater charge against Trump was that he withheld aid to Ukraine to pressure it into launching an investigation into Joe Biden and his son Hunter Biden.

Trump did broadly urge such an investigation in his conversation with the Ukraine president. There was a sliver of connection to an existing, authorised, separate US Justice Department investigation. But any way you cut it, it was a tacky, unbecoming, unpresidential, even dishonourable thing for Trump to do.

Pete Buttigieg, the Democrats’ apparent winner in Iowa. Picture: AFP Pete Buttigieg, the Democrats’ apparent winner in Iowa. Picture: AFP

It does not remotely resemble, barely exists even in the same universe as, one of the “high crimes and misdemeanours” that would justify impeachment and removal from office.

Washington Republicans have not been very popular these past few years. According to the polls, they are now substantially more popular than the Democrats.

This is because the Democrats’ impeachment arguments are so intrinsically unreasonable and disproportionate. High-profile former presidential candidate senator Lindsey Graham demonstrated just how easy it is for the Republicans to make the argument when he said: “They (Democrats) were going to impeach the President because there was a small delay in aid to Ukraine to leverage an investigation into a political opponent. No investigation took place and the aid flowed. And on this basis they were going to deprive the American people of their election choice?”

As the impeachment process has unfolded, public support for it has declined and Trump’s approval ratings have risen. Gallup, whose polls normally are not at the pro-Trump end of the polling spectrum, reports Trump’s overall approval rating at 49 per cent. His approval as an economic manager is a staggering 64 per cent.

Trump was able to boast in his State of the Union speech that he has delivered the “great American revival” that he promised as a ­candidate.

Unemployment is at its lowest rate in more than 50 years. The Federal Reserve forecasts economic growth in the US this year of 2 per cent, down a little from last year but still a leading result among developed nations. Trump has just concluded a so-called “phase one” trade deal with China. Beijing has promised to buy $US200bn ($297.8bn) more in US exports. This deal is an affront to the principles of free trade and Beijing has a long record of never actually buying the dollar sums it notionally commits to in headline trade agreements. But Beijing wants peace, even a temporary peace, with Trump and the Chinese will surely buy a lot of US farm goods this year.

Trump’s economic achievements are substantial. He has cut taxes and deregulated business. Under his presidency the US has created seven million new jobs, vastly more than anyone forecast when he was elected. The key minorities — African-Americans, Hispanics and Asian-Americans — are experiencing record low ­unemployment rates.

Trump has delivered to some extent for the minorities who voted against him. And he has delivered for the working class. There is a boom in blue-collar jobs and blue-collar wages.

It is true, of course, that all this is being purchased, in part, with debt and deficit that are surely unsustainable. In so far as Trump has an approach to national debt, it is for the US economy to grow its way out of the debt.

The US Senate votes against impeachment. Picture: AP The US Senate votes against impeachment. Picture: AP

But any president would claim the credit for these overall economic figures.

Trump is delivering on other promises. He is building his wall with Mexico. He is asserting control over US borders. In his State of the Union speech he spoke against illegal immigration but in favour of legal immigration. He didn’t mention Australia by name in this speech but he once more proposed an Australian-style immigration system, where immigrants are chosen for skills and for the contribution they can make to America.

Under Bill Clinton and Barack Obama the Democrats were in favour, at least rhetorically, of asserting control over US borders and preventing or discouraging illegal immigrants. Under Obama, the US arrested and deported hundreds of thousands of illegal immigrants. That most of the left and progressive side of the Democratic Party now effectively promotes open borders, and even Democratic centrists oppose any actual measure to control borders, shows just how far left the Democrats have moved.

This move leftwards has secular and even global causes. But it is also exacerbated by the disorienting effect Trump has on his opponents, the famous Trump derangement syndrome. He drives them nuts. Many Australian commentators suffer from this condition. Tim Costello, in a bizarre recent piece, argued that merely opposing the idea that Trump should be removed from office between elections constituted being “a religious standard-bearer for Trump”.

This betrays a representative left-of-centre moral disorder in which anyone who doesn’t embrace relentless, undiscriminating hatred of Trump and all his works is condemned as morally and ethically unworthy, a slave to atavistic prejudices and irrational hatreds.

Some of Trump’s moves on immigration have been excessive and unconscionable, such as the brief period when children were forcibly separated from their parents at the border. Evangelical leaders, among Trump’s strongest backers, condemned him for this and he quickly changed.

But there is no doubt most Americans, including most immigrants, want the US to control its borders. If the Democrats nominate a far-left candidate who preaches open borders, they both offend common sense and handicap themselves in the election. Trump must be hoping the Democrats go down this path.

The State of the Union speech contained serious bids for Hispanic and black votes. If Trump were to wins 40 per cent of Hispanics and 20 per cent of African-Americans he would almost certainly be re-elected.

Other things Trump said were worth listening to as well. He hailed in the audience a mother and her beautiful two-year-old daughter. This little girl was born after 21 weeks’ gestation. Surely at 21 weeks, and certainly at 22 weeks, she was a human being. If you believe human beings have universal human rights surely she enjoyed human rights at 22 weeks. Do other babies also enjoy human rights at 22 weeks? What does that say about the human rights dimension of late-term abortions?

There was no audible booing when Trump was talking of this little girl. To boo Trump then would have meant Democrats booing the mother and her daughter. This was a dignified and powerful part of Trump’s speech. No president has ever raised this issue in this way before. It is not surprising that people who regard such issues as important think there is some value in Trump’s presidency.

The State of the Union speech had one pure Trump innovation in communications. Presidents since Ronald Reagan have been hailing designated audience members as exemplifying particular political or civic virtues. But Trump went further. He gave one little girl a scholarship. He allegedly surprised one military wife by bringing her husband home to her there and then. He promoted one proud African-American military ­veter­an, age 100, to the rank of general. What can the Democrats do about all this?

They can’t run on the economy. Impeachment was a farce. They will run on Trump’s character, which a lot of Americans don’t like, but Americans have got used to Trump by now. The big recent rise in Trump’s approval rating has come from increases in approval among the growing share of the population who call themselves Republicans, and an increase in approval among independents, which is surely based on the ­economy.

If the Democrats end up, in Bernie Sanders, with a self- ­described socialist preaching revolution who wants to throw open the borders, abolish private health insurance and de-industrialise the nation in the interests of climate change, they will make Trump very, very hard to beat.

But November is a long way away and anything can happen. At time of writing it looks like Pete Buttigieg, the former small-city mayor from the mid-west, has just won Iowa. Sanders is likely to win New Hampshire next week. After New Hampshire comes Nevada and then South Carolina.

Iowa, New Hampshire and Nevada don’t select many delegates but they confer, or destroy, momentum. Joe Biden, the establishment favourite who in notional polls does best against Trump among all the Democrats, finished a humiliating fourth in Iowa.

No one has won the presidency without finishing first or second in their party’s primary in New Hampshire. Biden is favoured in South Carolina because he has inherited goodwill from African-American Democrats after eight years serving with Barack Obama. Four different Democrats could each win one of the first four ­primaries.

After Nevada comes a huge slew of states in Super Tuesday on March 3 and more than 1300 nominating conference delegates. By then, former New York mayor Mich­ael Bloomberg, with billions of dollars at his disposal, will be making his maximum run.

The Democrats could just about find themselves in a divided nominating conference, with no one having a majority and a brokered outcome. The longer the process goes on the more fiercely the Democrats will fight and damage each other.

Mayor Pete, as Buttigieg is called, is certainly the shiny new winner. He is a centrist, very likeable, a mid-westerner, a military veteran, and young and good-looking. He is openly gay but doesn’t wallow in identity politics. Hopefully his sexual orientation has no effect one way or the other.

If Biden collapses would Buttigieg or Bloomberg inherit his support as the most electable ­centrist? American politics can always surprise you. Neither Clinton, nor Obama, or Trump himself was considered likely to win his party’s nomination, much less the presidency, when their respective primaries began.

Trump may yet be like NSW in a State of Origin rugby league match leading by 10 points at half time. Don’t take anything for granted.

Then again, it’s always better to be winning.

greg_sheridan.png
FOREIGN EDITOR
Greg Sheridan, The Australian's foreign editor, is one of the nation's most influential national security commentators, who is active across television and radio and also writes extensively on culture. He has w... Read more
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An interesting article.

I don’t really subscribe to the view that Trump can defeat himself.   His support base would vote for him now regardless as he has fostered a cult.

Unsurprisingly the writer mischaracterises Bernie’s policies......but that is common in all mainstream media.  One thing to note is that Sanders is not, and never has been, a Democrat.  He is an independent Senator from Vermont who is very much at odds with the mainstream Corporate Democrats who largely are simply financed by a different set of billionaires and large corporations than the Republicans (and sometimes by the very same ones hedging their bets).

The Democratic Party are indeed in a mess as indeed are the Republican Party.  The latter has simply been usurped totally by Trump which makes me wonder where they go when Trump’s time is up either this year, 2024, or sometime in between.

Whilst Sanders might provide a transformative agenda it is almost indisputable that he is coming at this too late in his life.  Who he names as his running-mate in due course will be important.  Buttigieg sank a lot of campaign money into Iowa and it has paid off by raising his profile however he comes across as another Obama.  Plenty of style diverse background, clever rhetoric, but lacking in substance and in the pockets of his wealthy backers.

As was demonstrated in 2016 Trump does not need to garner more votes than his opponent.  He only needs to win the marginal States as he did before.  The only way an opponent can defeat him in those is by galvanising some of the people who stayed away in 2016.  Clearly a candidate who stands for the same as Hillary is very unlikely to succeed.  Sanders may be the most likely candidate to do so which is why the voter turnout in the coming primaries is going to be as interesting as the actual results.

Edited by Gbye grey sky
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40 minutes ago, Parley said:

https://www.theage.com.au/world/north-america/trump-is-obsessed-with-height-now-he-s-trying-to-weaponise-it-in-the-election-20200213-p540ay.html

 

This is interesting.

I think there is something in this. Human psychology means we are unlikely to vote for a short candidate.

Height implies authority and leadership.

Do you think that's why Warner was photoshopped with his wife?  To try and make him more like-able?

 

David Warner is shown towering over Ellyse Perry on the front page of The Australian newspaper on Tuesday.

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4 minutes ago, Toots said:

Oh dear.  😶

Is that all you can come up with ?

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I want it all, and I want it now.

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Just now, Parley said:

Is that all you can come up with ?

Yes.  It's best I don't comment on that whole Trump and height thing.  I'd just get into trouble with various other PIO members.  🤣

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4 hours ago, Parley said:

https://www.theage.com.au/world/north-america/trump-is-obsessed-with-height-now-he-s-trying-to-weaponise-it-in-the-election-20200213-p540ay.html

 

This is interesting.

I think there is something in this. Human psychology means we are unlikely to vote for a short candidate.

Height implies authority and leadership.

Little man's disease is real.

 

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5 hours ago, Parley said:

https://www.theage.com.au/world/north-america/trump-is-obsessed-with-height-now-he-s-trying-to-weaponise-it-in-the-election-20200213-p540ay.html

 

This is interesting.

I think there is something in this. Human psychology means we are unlikely to vote for a short candidate.

Height implies authority and leadership.

John Howard, Bob hawke.

Maybe it's an American thing?

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He's not handling the outbreak very well.
Late Friday, on the way to Mar-a-Lago, President Donald Trump stopped by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta to tour the facility and talk about his administration's approach to handling the coronavirus pandemic.

It was, even by Trump's standards, a shocking performance. The President bragged about his performance, his foresight and his smarts while attacking his political enemies and the media for allegedly blowing the threat of the virus out of proportion.

 

Quote

. "And the whole situation is -- the testing has been amazing, actually. What they've been able to produce in such a short period of time."

"We don't have enough tests today to meet what we anticipate will be the demand going forward." -- Vice President Mike Pence, Thursday, March 5. And away we go!
2. "Just so you understand, now it's all performing perfectly."
Trump is talking about the testing for coronavirus happening at the CDC. But in truth, this could be Trump talking about anything having to do with the virus. Or not!
3. "No, it's performing very well, and it has been performing very well."
Uh huh. (See No. 1.)
4. "But we're also considering the fact that last year we had approximately 36,000 deaths due to what's called the flu."
"What's called the flu."
5. "As of the time I left the plane with you, we had 240 cases. That's at least what was on a very fine network known as Fox News. And you love it. But that's what I happened to be watching. And how was the show last night? Did it get good ratings, by the way?"
In which the President of the United States transitions from the number of Americans who have been sickened by the coronavirus to the TV ratings from his town hall interview on Fox News. Sure! Very normal!
6. "I heard it broke all ratings records, but maybe that's wrong. That's what they told me. I don't know. I can't imagine that."
Yes, Trump is focused on whether his appearance on Fox "broke all ratings records." And also yes, he is at the CDC, surrounded by experts in infectious disease addressing a growing public health crisis.
7. "And I've heard the numbers are getting much better in China, but I hear the numbers are getting much better in Italy, et cetera, et cetera."
Less than 48 hours after Trump said this, coronavirus cases -- and deaths -- spiked in Italy, causing the country's government to issue a lockdown of northern Italy.
8. "But over the last long period of time, when people have the flu, you have an average of 36,000 people dying. I've never heard those numbers. I would -- I would've been shocked. I would've said, 'Does anybody die from the flu?' I didn't know people died from the flu -- 36,000 people died."
The President of the United States was, until very recently, unaware that anyone died from the flu. So, yeah.
9. "I don't watch CNN. That's why I don't recognize you."
[narrator voice] He does watch CNN.
10. "I really don't -- I don't watch it. I don't watch CNN because CNN is fake news."
Again, he does.
11. "I think people are staying in the United States more. They're going to spend their money in the United States. And then this is ended. It will end."
OK, so the economic impact of coronavirus on the US will be a net positive then? [checks stock market, frowns]
12. "I do think that if you look at the numbers and you look at the numbers from other years on other things, and you look at these numbers, it'll be interesting to see what you find."
He's talking about the number of people sickened or killed by the coronavirus. I think.
13. "People have to feel comfortable to have a good time."
So true!
14. "We've had 11 deaths, and they've been largely old people who are -- who were susceptible to what's happening."
Within the next few days, the death toll from coronavirus in the United States doubled.
15. "You know, I'm a person that was never big on the hand-shaking deal throughout my life. They used to criticize me for it or laugh about it or have fun with it."
"The Purell presidency: Trump aides learn the president's real red line" -- Politico, 2017
16. "The fact is I feel very secure. I feel very secure."
Life goals.
17. "I haven't had any problems filling them. I mean, we just had one in North Carolina, South Carolina -- all over the place. And we have tens of thousands of people standing outside the arena."
The question Trump was asked was whether he had any concerns about holding big campaign rallies given warning about the community spread of coronavirus. His answer? His rallies are packed. So, yeah.
18. "Anybody that wants a test can get a test. That's what the bottom line is."
"You may not get a test unless a doctor or public health official prescribes a test." -- Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar
19. "They have the tests. And the tests are beautiful. Anybody that needs a test gets a test."
What would you say are the traits of a "beautiful" test for coronavirus?
20. "But as of right now and yesterday, anybody that needs a test -- that's the important thing -- and the tests are all perfect, like the letter was perfect. The transcription was perfect, right? This was not as perfect as that, but pretty good."
So, the coronavirus test is perfect just like Trump's July 2019 phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky was perfect? Or the transcription of that call, which was not a transcript at all. If this doesn't worry you, you aren't paying attention.
21. "I'd rather have the people stay, but I'd go with them. I told them to make the final decision. I would rather -- because I like the numbers being where they are. I don't need to have the numbers double because of one ship."
The President openly acknowledges here that the reason he wants the people on the cruise ship off California to stay there is not for any medical reason but because he wants to keep the number of reported coronavirus cases (artificially) low. This is nuts.
22. "No, I like the numbers. I would rather have the numbers stay where they are. But if they want to take them off, they'll take them off. But if that happens, all of a sudden your 240 is obviously going to be a much higher number, and probably the 11 will be a higher number too."
[head explodes]
23. "You know, my uncle was a great person. He was at MIT. He taught at MIT for, I think, like a record number of years. He was a great super genius. Dr. John Trump."
How did Trump get on this subject, you ask? I have absolutely no idea. He was praising NIH for how they are handling the coronavirus outbreak and then -- whammo -- Dr. John Trump, "super genius."
24. "I like this stuff. I really get it. People are surprised that I understand it. Every one of these doctors said, 'How do you know so much about this?' Maybe I have a natural ability. Maybe I should have done that instead of running for President."
This is a real quote from the President of the United States. What more is there to say.
25. "So I told Mike not to be complimentary to the governor because that governor is a snake."
Vice President Mike Pence praised Washington Gov. Jay Inslee for how he is handling the coronavirus in his state. Trump called Inslee a "snake." This feels like a good place to end.

 

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Mike Pence seems very impressive to me.

I hope he takes over in 4 years time

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I want it all, and I want it now.

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17 hours ago, Parley said:

Mike Pence seems very impressive to me.

I hope he takes over in 4 years time

When Covid  hits the fan in the US be prepared for all the deficiencies in Trump'x administration and society to be on display in all its hideousness, the lack of anything approximating to some form of socialised medical care is going to be plain to see and it is going to be devastating for them. Trump does not have a clue as to how vulnerable his country is and his ignorance is going to be on display for all to see..

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When Covid  hits the fan in the US be prepared for all the deficiencies in Trump'x administration and society to be on display in all its hideousness, the lack of anything approximating to some form of socialised medical care is going to be plain to see and it is going to be devastating for them. Trump does not have a clue as to how vulnerable his country is and his ignorance is going to be on display for all to see..



Sadly true. They will have to pass lots of emergency measures, quickly to even think about mobilising in time

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President Donald Trump Jr?

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23 hours ago, BacktoDemocracy said:

When Covid  hits the fan in the US be prepared for all the deficiencies in Trump'x administration and society to be on display in all its hideousness, the lack of anything approximating to some form of socialised medical care is going to be plain to see and it is going to be devastating for them. Trump does not have a clue as to how vulnerable his country is and his ignorance is going to be on display for all to see..

This is a world wide thing. Europe is in far worse shape than the US currently.

How is UK doing ?


I want it all, and I want it now.

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.........except from Britain and Eire. A blatant political move, I suppose he reckons American business people can't carry it back on their return 

So when the epidemic hits the US he ain't goin' to be able to blame all those pesky furriners. A real smart move Chumpy, keep up the good work with those mass election rallies, lol's

On a serious note anyone affected by this virus yet, apart from seeing their pension pot shrink by 20%.

He certainly seems to be losing the plot in the last couple of weeks, I mean what better way to put Boeing, remember the grounding of their defective plane, and the airlines out of business and leave Airbus as the dominant force in in plane production.

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On 11/02/2020 at 02:47, Gbye grey sky said:

My post was actually about Bernie Sanders because I was responding to a poster who thought Bernie’s policy of providing medical care to all Americans was brainless so how did you make this quantum leap?

Trump has done nothing that personally affects me so far as I am aware.  Indeed I actively try to avoid listening to him these days (not easy) as, to put it bluntly, when I do hear him speak or see one of his tweets I find him almost unintelligible as I only speak English, not gibberish.

I would have been unable to vote for him or for Hillary if I was American in 2016.  I would perhaps have been a Jill Stein voter in that scenario or would have sided with the majority of Americans who stayed away and effectively said ‘none of the above’.

Just hope that there is a better option for the American people in 2020.

There wont be , because it looks like the democrats are going to put forward , joe Biden- dear me .

Back to big business and wars in the middle east , if Biden gets in .

Hes from the lineage of bush snr and jr ,the Clinton's and obama - more of the same issues that have plagued us for nearly 30 yrs , since the 1st gulf war .

God help us .


BUT I DONT FEEL AFRAID

AS LONG AS I GAZE AT

WATERLOO SUNSET

IAM IN PARADISE

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Just now, bunbury61 said:

There wont be , because it looks like the democrats are going to put forward , joe Biden- dear me .

Back to big business and wars in the middle east , if Biden gets in .

Hes from the lineage of bush snr and jr ,the Clinton's and obama - more of the same issues that have plagued us for nearly 30 yrs , since the 1st gulf war .

God help us .

And before someone states that the bushs were republicans and the Clinton's and obama were democrats ,- I know .

Different parties - same shit 

 

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BUT I DONT FEEL AFRAID

AS LONG AS I GAZE AT

WATERLOO SUNSET

IAM IN PARADISE

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2 minutes ago, bunbury61 said:

There wont be , because it looks like the democrats are going to put forward , joe Biden- dear me .

Back to big business and wars in the middle east , if Biden gets in .

Hes from the lineage of bush snr and jr ,the Clinton's and obama - more of the same issues that have plagued us for nearly 30 yrs , since the 1st gulf war .

God help us .

I watched a Bernie Sanders speech the other day .

My wife turned to me and said " that speech could have been written for Donald Trump " .

Anti war , and anti Washington 


BUT I DONT FEEL AFRAID

AS LONG AS I GAZE AT

WATERLOO SUNSET

IAM IN PARADISE

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6 hours ago, bunbury61 said:

There wont be , because it looks like the democrats are going to put forward , joe Biden- dear me .

Back to big business and wars in the middle east , if Biden gets in .

Hes from the lineage of bush snr and jr ,the Clinton's and obama - more of the same issues that have plagued us for nearly 30 yrs , since the 1st gulf war .

God help us .

You are seriously deluded if you think that it hasn’t all been about backing billionaires and big business under the current administration too.

Yes, Biden is an awful choice for the reasons you statemistakenly supported strongly by older black voters simply because Obama picked him as his running mate - ironically to calm white voters.

The choice of Biden probably strengthens Trumps hand.  Don’t know if Biden will prove to be electoral poison as Hillary was but he is very vulnerable.  The Ukrainian question will resurface often and there are serious doubts about Biden’s mental state as his gaffes become more and more bizarre.

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Timeline: 309/100 Sent 7/8/13, Money Taken 9/8/13, CO appointed 3/9/13. Med 3/12/13. Police check 4/12/13. VISA GRANTED 8/4/14, Subclass100. Recce August 2014. Arrived 30 July 2015.

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55 minutes ago, Gbye grey sky said:

You are seriously deluded if you think that it hasn’t all been about backing billionaires and big business under the current administration too.

Yes, Biden is an awful choice for the reasons you statemistakenly supported strongly by older black voters simply because Obama picked him as his running mate - ironically to calm white voters.

The choice of Biden probably strengthens Trumps hand.  Don’t know if Biden will prove to be electoral poison as Hillary was but he is very vulnerable.  The Ukrainian question will resurface often and there are serious doubts about Biden’s mental state as his gaffes become more and more bizarre.

It's really quite sad that the only choice the Americans have is Trump or Biden.  Almost as bad as the choice we had between Shorten and Morrison. 😬

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Posted (edited)
On 10/03/2020 at 12:00, unzippy said:

He's not handling the outbreak very well.
Late Friday, on the way to Mar-a-Lago, President Donald Trump stopped by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta to tour the facility and talk about his administration's approach to handling the coronavirus pandemic.

It was, even by Trump's standards, a shocking performance. The President bragged about his performance, his foresight and his smarts while attacking his political enemies and the media for allegedly blowing the threat of the virus out of proportion.

 

 

Irrespective, Trump will be there for four more years.  I watched Biden on the hustings recently and thought that he seemed to be struggling with his speech and presentation as well as muddling certain issues. There has been media speculation that he is in the early stages of dementia.  Hopefully not. It may only be speculation from Fox News or similar, but he did seem to struggle. 

Edited by Dusty Plains
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