Jump to content

You're currently viewing the forum as a Guest
register-now-button_orig.png
and join in with discussions   
ask migration questions
message other members

..and much much more!

MelT

Child and Disability Benefits UK - moving back from Astralia

Recommended Posts

It doesn't make a difference, many non-residents pay NI from abroad.

 

Unfortunately there is more than one type of National insurance contributions

 

It is the EMPLOYER'S NI that affects your eligibility for carers allowance & none means tested JSA.

 

EMPLOYEE NI is a separate contribution and is for pensions and other benefits.

I remember at the time 5 years ago finding this get out clause on the government web site.

 

sorry i lost the links when i upgraded my PC.


First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a Socialist.
Then they came for the Trade Unionists, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a Trade Unionist.
Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out—
Because I was not a Jew.
Then they came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me.

Martin Niemöller

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I know of many parents who are granted disability living allowance for their kids with type 1 diabetes ... so my apologies if I confused the two ... carers v disability living allowance, DLA requires the two year residency rule as I posted previously. I am saddened though at the usual comments, Diabetes is a major 'issue' ... children die of this disease. Parents have to change their working life/hours/commitments to take care of their children when other adults refuse to step up and assist. Too many schools are lax in their care of a type 1 child with a general huge misunderstanding of the disease. I speak from bitter experience which I would willingly trade with Sammy who seems uninformed. So, as with most life experiences, if you have no knowledge and only opinions ... then please think before you speak ... you literally have no idea

 

I know a few parents who have kids with type 1 diabetes and they have not had to change their working life/hours/commitments massively. Not enough to warrant a benefit payment anyway. Obviously it is a serious disease for a child to contend with but with all the modern medicine, technology etc then it's certainly a lot more manageable. I worked in a primary school for a number of years and the diabetic kids had no more parental phone calls than the kids that were sent to school with bad colds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You will not be eligible ... currently you have to have lived in the UK for 2 years before claiming benefit. I know this because 10 months after our arrival back in UK our son was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and we were told the 2 year rule at the time we placed an application for carers allowance. We will wait until March and re-apply for the PIP allowance for him.

Sorry to hear about t1 but I never applied for dla till nearly two yrs after diagnosis... Then moved to Oz and been here a year and only just found out about carers allowance.... Hope all going ok x ps have you found all the fb support group,pages?

Edited by lp77

309/100 applied 24/12/14, CO allocated Jan 15, further info supplied Jan.. , police check August 2015, medical 21/09/15......309/100 granted November 2013, landed in Brisbane 7/1/16

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Benefits will be available to you when you arrive, you will need to meet certain criteria of course but it is certainly there. As in Australia they are tightening up on benefits which obviously makes sense. Don't panic or be put off by the political nonsense you often read on here, you will be looked after.

 

As I've said before people want reality not fantasy, these are people having to make momentous decisions, they need to know how it is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
REALLY!!! You can promise them that can you? It's political nonsense what other members have said is it? Again Chris you are talking about something you have no idea on. Although by saying "you need to meet certain criteria" is probably your get out clause. I'm on a disability support group and thousands of people can't claim, not just the U.K but Australia as well. Parents who have a child who can't walk, talk, stand, feed themselves can't claim disability. Another came forward yesterday who is a paraplegic and was denied help.

My doctor wants me to put a claim in not for money but for help around the house, I've told him it's pointless. There was a local case recently where a guy who lost his arm in an accident was denied NDIS. These are just the ones who came forward yesterday, there are thousands more. If you don't believe me pm me and I will give you the support groups details and you can speak to all these poor people and tell them not to panic and the government will change their mind.

 

It's not acceptable for this inaccurate information to be given to people who are facing life changing decisions

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yes that is something you have to take into account, things you pay for now may well be free in the UK.

 

Please just stop making comments about things unless you have real knowledge, these are people facing real life changing decisions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Benefits will be available to you when you arrive, you will need to meet certain criteria of course but it is certainly there. As in Australia they are tightening up on benefits which obviously makes sense. Don't panic or be put off by the political nonsense you often read on here, you will be looked after.

 

Follow todays parliamentary debate on further curtailment of access to "personal independence payments, PIP's, (what used to disability benefits) as the Government try to cut back eligibility after losing appeals by people refused PIP's.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Please just stop making comments about things unless you have real knowledge, these are people facing real life changing decisions.

 

I really don't think you see the irony in that comment.


Loving life in Gods Country. Woohoo, look at me. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As I've said before people want reality not fantasy, these are people having to make momentous decisions, they need to know how it is.

 

Again, no doubt the irony is completely lost on you.


Loving life in Gods Country. Woohoo, look at me. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Again, no doubt the irony is completely lost on you.

 

I'll ask again are you following the outcome of this afternoons debate on PIP's, that is the real issue, do you ever consider that actually for a significant section of British society this Govt is not interested in them, they are seen as wasters, a drag on the economy, people who do not contribute and therefore the country has no responsibility for them, they should have to rely on charity.

That is the view of many in this country now , that is a view expressed by George Freeman, one of Mays advisers in regards to PIP'S.

Wake up, you live in a world lurching back to 1930's at an unprecedented rate of knots, whenever the country faces recession whether it be in this century, the 20th or the 19th century it's the little people who get screwed and the only difference is that now the little people includes the salaried middle class.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Mel

 

Hope this helps

 

Enquiry Regarding UK State Pension

With the compliments of British Age Pensioner AllianceIf you have made only a few years contributions, or you have a long time to go before retirement date, then you should first consult our guidelines pension-guidelines.htm Voluntary contributions can improve your eligibility or increase the amount of pension, but remember that it is not a savings scheme. You do not get a refund if you die before pension age.

The good news is that you do not have to be a British citizen. If you worked in UK for a few years it may be worth your while enquiring about your rights.

Click on this link, enquiry-form.pdf, to bring up a form supplied by BAPA to assist you in enquiring about your eligibility for a British pension. Print it, fill it, and post it. Include it with a covering letter asking them to send you the appropriate application form.

Fill out the form to the best of your ability, add any additional information on the reverse and post it to:

International Pension Centre,

Tyneview Park,

Whitley Road,

Benton

Newcastle upon Tyne,NE98 1BA,UK

It would be better not to start the process with an email, because they do not get the same attention as a letter. But you may wish to use email as a follow up measure.

E-mail address: tvp.ipccsst@thepensionservice.gsi.gov.uk

Note: The e-mail address appears to change frequently.

You can download the official application form from the Pension Service website at http://www.thepensionservice.gov.uk/pdf/br1/br1apr09.pdf,

but it would be better to use our form to ask them about your rights.

With the compliments of British Age Pensioner Alliance

Back to Home Page

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Follow todays parliamentary debate on further curtailment of access to "personal independence payments, PIP's, (what used to disability benefits) as the Government try to cut back eligibility after losing appeals by people refused PIP's.

Thank you - i have been listening in as listen to Radio 4/World Service 24/7 :)

 

Sent from my SM-G920I using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'll ask again are you following the outcome of this afternoons debate on PIP's, that is the real issue, do you ever consider that actually for a significant section of British society this Govt is not interested in them, they are seen as wasters, a drag on the economy, people who do not contribute and therefore the country has no responsibility for them, they should have to rely on charity.

That is the view of many in this country now , that is a view expressed by George Freeman, one of Mays advisers in regards to PIP'S.

Wake up, you live in a world lurching back to 1930's at an unprecedented rate of knots, whenever the country faces recession whether it be in this century, the 20th or the 19th century it's the little people who get screwed and the only difference is that now the little people includes the salaried middle class.

Yes very sad.... If only the people in power and control truly understood what it is like to live or have family to support who have a disability. Australia struggles with simular issues also..

 

Sent from my SM-G920I using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MelT, just wondering if you have moved yet and how you have gotten on? I’m in the same situation. I’ve been in Melbourne for 14 years and really way to move back to the UK. My partner (Aussie) is very willing and keen but I just worry about schools as my son has a genetic condition and will likely need some additional help. It’s a very tough call but I desperately want to be back in the UK, close to my family. TIA x

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Zarzar said:

MelT, just wondering if you have moved yet and how you have gotten on? I’m in the same situation. I’ve been in Melbourne for 14 years and really way to move back to the UK. My partner (Aussie) is very willing and keen but I just worry about schools as my son has a genetic condition and will likely need some additional help. It’s a very tough call but I desperately want to be back in the UK, close to my family. TIA x

Have you looked into if your partner meets the visa requirements for the UK?  Does he have an EU passport/UK citizenship??  I know the rules have changed and it's not as easy to move back with a non EU partner as it once was.


I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Ali, I have looked into it. He’s not EU or UK but we do meet the financial criteria (we have the savings required to support him until visa is granted). It’s rubbish that is comes down to ££ but that’s the way if the world. X

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Zarzar said:

Thanks Ali, I have looked into it. He’s not EU or UK but we do meet the financial criteria (we have the savings required to support him until visa is granted). It’s rubbish that is comes down to ££ but that’s the way if the world. X

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MelT, just wondering if you have moved yet and how you have gotten on? I’m in the same situation. I’ve been in Melbourne for 14 years and really way to move back to the UK. My partner (Aussie) is very willing and keen but I just worry about schools as my son has a genetic condition and will likely need some additional help. It’s a very tough call but I desperately want to be back in the UK, close to my family. TIA x

Hi,

 

We are in the final stages, I hope.. of moving back. It has been hard as my parents, after all their talk about how much they wanted to go back have decided to stay here. Whereas, we are still going back home. My parents have now disowned us and have not spoken to us for 6 months.....Our house is on the market; we fly back n August as our son starts school in September.

 

Even our 14 year old son who has spent most of his life in Australia (although, has an English accent) feels a sense of belonging and more accepted in the UK. He had taster days at his new school in January and loved it so much, I have never seen him so content. It is a small private school that support children with dyslexia/learning difficulties and ADHD.

 

It certainly isn't going to be easy making this move, we still have to find jobs etc.. It will be worth it in the end. Australia has been good to us in some ways, but it just isn't home.

 

We decided we had to make the move now or never as the longer we left it the harder it will be to get jobs as we get older. Also We could not leave it any later otherwise our son would not be able to complete his GCSE's... then that makes things more tricky.. So hence why I say now or never.

 

My husbands family are all in the Uk as are all my family accept for my parents. So my husband is really looking forward to going home. Plus we have close friends we have kept in touch with and have seen on trips home so it will be great to have meaningful friendships again.. Although I am aware things may not be the same as before we left 13 years ago...

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, MelT said:

Hi,

 

We are in the final stages, I hope.. of moving back. It has been hard as my parents, after all their talk about how much they wanted to go back have decided to stay here. Whereas, we are still going back home. My parents have now disowned us and have not spoken to us for 6 months.....Our house is on the market; we fly back n August as our son starts school in September.

 

Even our 14 year old son who has spent most of his life in Australia (although, has an English accent) feels a sense of belonging and more accepted in the UK. He had taster days at his new school in January and loved it so much, I have never seen him so content. It is a small private school that support children with dyslexia/learning difficulties and ADHD.

 

It certainly isn't going to be easy making this move, we still have to find jobs etc.. It will be worth it in the end. Australia has been good to us in some ways, but it just isn't home.

 

We decided we had to make the move now or never as the longer we left it the harder it will be to get jobs as we get older. Also We could not leave it any later otherwise our son would not be able to complete his GCSE's... then that makes things more tricky.. So hence why I say now or never.

 

My husbands family are all in the Uk as are all my family accept for my parents. So my husband is really looking forward to going home. Plus we have close friends we have kept in touch with and have seen on trips home so it will be great to have meaningful friendships again.. Although I am aware things may not be the same as before we left 13 years ago...

 

Hi Mel, 

 

I'm so sorry to hear things are tough between you and your parents. That makes it really tough for you, despite wanting to leave.

That said, congrats on the up and coming move! It must feel relieving that your son feels happy and excited to start his new school. This makes me feel very positive about the prospect of moving back ?. The only thing that worries me is if the support will be there for my boy. 

My son is only 2.5 and it’s not 100% clear on what help he’ll need. Currently he has delayed speech and sees an OT too. Hes a very brigh, happy and interested kid. He’s been having intervention since he was 6m (as we got a very early dx) This is all done privately here as we get carers allowance to pay for it (NDIS due in October). I know the NHS would provide support but it tough to know what and how frequently. 

We feel a bit the same as you. If we don’t make the move at the end of next year it would be too disruptive to him starting school. I don’t think I could wait another 6/7years until secondary school.

All of my family are in the UK. Though my partners family are here and supportive it’s just not the same as being around the corner from my sister etc. 

Thanks so much for sharing. I hope everything goes really well for you! X

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are a couple of members here who are thinking of returning to the UK with disabled family members. I'm currently in the UK but will be returning to Australia because of the lack of support and services available. I'd rather not post personal details here but if I can help, please PM me.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×