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Medical concern

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Hi Everyone,

We have finally found an employer who is wishing to sponsor me on a 457 but we are now worried our dream maybe over before it has even started.

Earlier this year my wife was diagnosed with a rare form of ovarian cancer. After successful surgery, we thank god she is cancer free, but will this effect her medical regarding our 457 application? I have spoken to several MA regarding this but no one seems to know.

Any information will be greatly appreciated.

 

Ben

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Firstly, it's great to hear your wife is cancer free!

 

Is your sponsored occupation one that requires a medical? Unless things have changed (as they frequently do), non-medical or teaching occupations didn't require a medical when we applied, we just needed a medical for PR.

 

I have a history of thyroid cancer, although it was successfully treated years ago. Oddly, that wasn't the sticking point in my medical - the panel doctor didn't bat an eyelid. I had a fibrosis on one lung that he suspected was TB! Further scrutiny from a specialist cleared me.

 

Hopefully the recency of your wife's diagnosis won't be an issue. Cancer generally isn't. That is, if you do need medicals!


She'll be right!

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Firstly fantastic news on the all clear. Secondly I don't think it will stop a 457 as this is a tempory visa however if you want or are indeed able to apply for a permanent visa in the future, then it could cause problems. You need to speak to a Migration Agent such as Geaorge Lombard who specialises in these sorts of cases.

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You might also want to check how it might or might not affect any required medical insurance as a pre-existing condition.

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Thanks for kind words everyone.

I am a qualified painter and decorator and we are looking to go over with my skilled trade.

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Thanks for kind words everyone.

I am a qualified painter and decorator and we are looking to go over with my skilled trade.

 

Agree with above, shouldn't be an issue for the 457 as you are not entitled to full Medicare anyway. I would anticipate a problem with a future permanent visa whilst it was so recent, people that have been in remission for longer periods Do sometimes get visas however. I would also investigate the private health insurance before making a decision.

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Thanks guys, really appreciate everyone's time!

 

I read somewhere on here once that you needed five years in remission before they would grant a visa but that could be wrong / have changed. I have seen an agent called George Lombard recommended on here as someone who specialises in tricky medical histories.

 

We recently obtained a parents visa (sponsored by our adult child) and took along the treatment summary for my husband's lymphoma treatment in 1981. The panel doctor said it was a historical document!

 

I want to wish you the very best of luck with your visa and your future life together - may your visa come through and your life in Australia be everything you hope for.


103 visa application lodged February 2013. 143 visa application submitted January 2016. Police checks and form 80 submitted February 29th 2016. Visa granted April 4th 2016.

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If you treat the job as temporary you will not have a problem. However if you are looking at long term you may find that this is a problem. I am pleased your is in remission. My good friend had ovarian cancer and this was 10 years ago, however she has a lot of ongoing medical expenses. For example she now has 7 tumors in her lungs which appeared years after her first bout and in on expensive drugs to suppress them and they are successful. So its the cost of the treatment not what is wrong with people that they look into.

 

My daughter has brain cancer and will never be in remission despite it being 12 years ago. She would have like to go to Canada but she knows she cannot due to her diagnosis. Just to add every time she has to arrange insurance to travel anywhere its very costly for her.

 

Another thing is to find out what your wife's ongoing treatment will be and will it be available here and if she is on special drugs how much they will cost. We pay for our prescriptions here and if drugs are non on the list then they are very expensive. Some conditions can have some drugs some cannot. For example with diabetics type 1 can have drugs on the pbs but type 2 have to pay for them.

Edited by Petals

Petals

:ssign15:taking no prisoners :wink:

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Thanks Fisher1, will look George Lombard up.

Petals, my wife is not on medication, if any rumours are to accur then surgery is the only option to remove them. We have been informed chemo will only be used if a tumour grows on an organ which cannot be removed.

We are looking long term in Australia, but obviously now is a very very difficult desicion if we can't find any answers.

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Thanks Fisher1, will look George Lombard up.

Petals, my wife is not on medication, if any rumours are to accur then surgery is the only option to remove them. We have been informed chemo will only be used if a tumour grows on an organ which cannot be removed.

We are looking long term in Australia, but obviously now is a very very difficult desicion if we can't find any answers.

George Lombard or Peter Bollard are the two usually mentioned with respect to medical conditions but I agree with the others - short term and temporary should not be that much of an issue - however you could find yourself in a bit of a pickle with regards to private insurance and pre-existing conditions in the first instance. In the longer term, she would need to be in remission for over 5 years before you could think of PR and even then they would look at the prospects for that type of cancer and potential costs for treatment. You wouldn't know for sure what the outcome would be until you did it.

 

It'd be wise to check out also, just how far the Medicare reciprocal agreement stretches - it is possible that you could be expected to go home for treatment if things flare up again and then you could find yourself in trouble with the NHS as non residents!

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