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leahgoldsmith

maybe moving back at the end of year 10

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hey.

my family and i are having thoughts about moving back to the Uk, either at the end of this year, when i finish year 10, or in 2 years time when i finish year 12. I have been told by some of my teachers that its 'now or never' as i will be able to resit year 11 over there and take my gcse's which will then get me into college. I've also been told that if i stay for 2 years and graduate my ATAR's score won't count over in the uk, does anyone have any information on this? Any help will be mutely appreciated :)

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hey.

my family and i are having thoughts about moving back to the Uk, either at the end of this year, when i finish year 10, or in 2 years time when i finish year 12. I have been told by some of my teachers that its 'now or never' as i will be able to resit year 11 over there and take my gcse's which will then get me into college. I've also been told that if i stay for 2 years and graduate my ATAR's score won't count over in the uk, does anyone have any information on this? Any help will be mutely appreciated :)

 

The most important thing to look into is what fees you'll have to pay at college or university in the UK. Just because you were (I assume) born in Britain doesn't mean you'll be treated like a local: you may be classed as an international student and have to pay international fees, which can be horrendous. You have to be resident in the UK for a certain period of time before you're eligible to be treated as a local.

 

I'm not sure of the rules myself but I'm sure someone will be along to confirm them. What course were you thinking of doing and where?


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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My thoughts are the sooner the better, it just makes the whole process so much easier.


Loving life in Gods Country. Woohoo, look at me. 

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A lot will depend on your date of birth, but I'm not sure that coming back to repeat year 11 is a good idea, except for the domestic fees at uni point. All (or almost all) GCSEs are linear courses now, which means they're all full two year courses with all exams taken st the end of those two years.

However, depending on your age, date of birth and educational level, you could go straight to a college and take the full two year courses for GCSE or A levels. If the latter, you could then take a gap year before starting uni which would qualify you for the three years residency requirements for domestic fees and conditions.

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My thoughts are the sooner the better, it just makes the whole process so much easier.

 

That is what we thought too, the sooner the better really. We have kids and the thought is that it would be best to start the new year, (start of high school) the same as when the others kids do. That way there is no standing out and adding to what is already a difficult time and adjustment period. All the people are new to high school and are in the same boat. Also that way you will be able to find out at what level you are and then work towards that.


Family of five now with our one son living in the UK

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hey.

my family and i are having thoughts about moving back to the Uk, either at the end of this year, when i finish year 10, or in 2 years time when i finish year 12. I have been told by some of my teachers that its 'now or never' as i will be able to resit year 11 over there and take my gcse's which will then get me into college. I've also been told that if i stay for 2 years and graduate my ATAR's score won't count over in the uk, does anyone have any information on this? Any help will be mutely appreciated :)

 

The ATAR score absolutely counts in the UK and UK universities love overseas students because of the fees you would pay. You would have no difficulty getting a palce but as others have said you would be classed as an international student if you have not lived in the EU for the previous 3 years.

 

So in that sense it makes more sense to come back sooner - I would consider going to an FE or 6th form college at 16 and do 1 year GCSE courses (this is the norm at colleges) and then 2 year A level courses. This will give you 3 years residency as well. The GCSE courses may well seem very easy to you, and some of your fellow students may be, shall we say not so committed but I taught in a college and had many students start with me with no GCSE's, go on to do A levels and then university.

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Sooner rather than later! Get some GCSEs under your belt then launch into A levels. Remember that the Aussie years don't really equate to UK years.

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A lot will depend on your date of birth, but I'm not sure that coming back to repeat year 11 is a good idea, except for the domestic fees at uni point. All (or almost all) GCSEs are linear courses now, which means they're all full two year courses with all exams taken st the end of those two years.

However, depending on your age, date of birth and educational level, you could go straight to a college and take the full two year courses for GCSE or A levels. If the latter, you could then take a gap year before starting uni which would qualify you for the three years residency requirements for domestic fees and conditions.

 

My eldest already has a GCSE in science after completing year 10.

 

My middle child will get one in science and English when he finishes year 10 this year.

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My eldest already has a GCSE in science after completing year 10.

 

My middle child will get one in science and English when he finishes year 10 this year.

 

That's why I said 'almost all' in brackets. I know there are some which haven't yet changed, but wasn't sure exactly which ones. It was different every time for all our kids and that was before Gove's changes.

 

It would be best for the op to contact the colleges and schools she's considering to find out what they would advise. We moved back from Australia when our eldest had missed the first term of year 10, and moved again (within the UK) when our middle one had just finished year 10, so I know it can be done, but it's not easy and you need a supportive environment for it to work, especially when the curriculum and syllabus is different.

It worked for our girls, but they did have to be very self motivated to adapt and study independently to cover the differences in courses. There were subjects the middle one couldn't take at her new school because the differences were too great to catch up with, despite her being very conscientious and hard working.

Edited by caramac

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That's why I said 'almost all' in brackets. I know there are some which haven't yet changed, but wasn't sure exactly which ones. It was different every time for all our kids and that was before Gove's changes.

 

It would be best for the op to contact the colleges and schools she's considering to find out what they would advise. We moved back from Australia when our eldest had missed the first term of year 10, and moved again (within the UK) when our middle one had just finished year 10, so I know it can be done, but it's not easy and you need a supportive environment for it to work, especially when the curriculum and syllabus is different.

It worked for our girls, but they did have to be very self motivated to adapt and study independently to cover the differences in courses. There were subjects the middle one couldn't take at her new school because the differences were too great to catch up with, despite her being very conscientious and hard working.

 

I was agreeing with you by the way

 

I think in many schools it would be hard to move into year 11.

 

It would be easier to repeat year 10 if it can be done.

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Me too, with you, but I'm on my phone (battery gone on iPad) and my ageing eyesight is so bad I can only see a couple of words at a time and can't keep up with what I'm typing! I don't like this getting old business.. Sorry if it came across badly.

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We will be in this situation. My child has been diagnosed with dyslexia and won't be taking the atar pathway. Her birthday is in June so still only 15. We were aiming to return in January if not sooner (waiting for our house to sell) I was thinking that I could try to get her in to year 10 in the uk if we could. Should we wait until end of this school year in oz to move (if we sell our house within the next month)? Would it be better to go straight to a college? Advice would be appreciated.

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We will be in this situation. My child has been diagnosed with dyslexia and won't be taking the atar pathway. Her birthday is in June so still only 15. We were aiming to return in January if not sooner (waiting for our house to sell) I was thinking that I could try to get her in to year 10 in the uk if we could. Should we wait until end of this school year in oz to move (if we sell our house within the next month)? Would it be better to go straight to a college? Advice would be appreciated.

 

It would definitely be too late to start GCSE courses in school, even without additional learning needs - the school year in England starts September as you probably know so arriving just after her 16th birthday and starting college in the September would probably be the best option.

 

Colleges do a range of academic and vocational courses and there will be something suitable for the capability and interest of your daughter. The only thing is you may need to pay fees - you definitely do for Higher Education and my husband tried to enrol for a Photography course and did not qualify as we had been out of the country for the previous 3 years. You may find there are no fees at a 6th form college (as opposed to FE college) and many do vocation courses too.

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Thanks for replying. We were hoping to be back before she starts year 11 in February so that leaves a few months before the start of college in September - has anyone had any experience of this? Should I start her in college when we get there or repeat half of UK year 10?

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