Jump to content
Marisawright

That sense of belonging - sums it up, really

Recommended Posts

I think we're all familiar with "I Love a Sunburnt Country", but I had never seen the verse that comes before the famous one. Pretty much sums up the feelings of some PIO'ers one way or the other:

 

The love of field and coppice,

Of green and shaded lanes.

Of ordered woods and gardens

Is running in your veins,

Strong love of grey-blue distance

Brown streams and soft dim skies

I know but cannot share it,

My love is otherwise.

 

I love a sunburnt country,

A land of sweeping plains,

Of ragged mountain ranges,

Of droughts and flooding rains.

I love her far horizons,

I love her jewel-sea,

Her beauty and her terror –

The wide brown land for me!

 

Dorothea McKellar


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes the first verse does it for me. Quite honestly a sunburnt country hold very little appeal for me.


Loving life in Gods Country. Woohoo, look at me. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Probably why I feel I 'belong' where I am now ....................... I'm talking about the first verse. Coincidently, I was out walking in the mizzle and drizzle this afternoon listening to the waves crashing on the rocks and everywhere smelt fresh and clean and (I know it sounds corny) I just felt a surge of happiness being where I 'belong'.


Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take but by the moments that take our breath away :smile:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As far as i remember (couldnt be bothered googling)

 

She left australia as a youngster and lived in england the rest of her life,

 

She wrote this near the end of her life.

 

Its strange that different ages learnt different verses at school.

 

My mum learnt 2,3,5,6, i learnt 2,3,4,6.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As far as i remember (couldnt be bothered googling)

 

She left australia as a youngster and lived in england the rest of her life,

 

She wrote this near the end of her life.

 

 

 

Not quite!

 

She wrote it when she was 19 and on a visit to England with her family.

She travelled a lot with her father but always lived in Australia. She built her famous house on Pittwater in 1925 and died in Paddington, Sydney in 1968. :yes:

 

You might be thinking of PL Travers who did leave Australia when young and never returned.

Edited by NickyNook

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The first time I read that poem was when we had been here about 6 months. It brought me to tears. Says it all for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Its strange that different ages learnt different verses at school.

 

My mum learnt 2,3,5,6, i learnt 2,3,4,6.

 

I didn't learn it at school but I had never seen that first verse quoted anywhere. Strange that everyone seems to have decided to dump it, when in fact it's the whole point of the poem - comparing the fact that some love the soft scenery of England whereas she loves the harshness of the Australian landscape.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My version (don't take seriously)

 

I dislike a sunburnt country,

a land of nothing but sand

lots of jerry built houses

in suburbs that were bland

I hated her far apart boozers,

and shark infested sea

you've entered early retirement

when you're only 33 !!

 

johngdownuder

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I didn't learn it at school but I had never seen that first verse quoted anywhere. Strange that everyone seems to have decided to dump it, when in fact it's the whole point of the poem - comparing the fact that some love the soft scenery of England whereas she loves the harshness of the Australian landscape.

 

I guess alot of Aussies felt it wasnt necessary. And i tend to agree.

 

Most residents of Australia were born either here or somewhere else in the world other than England,

 

So the first verse wouldn't make much sense to the majority, as it would not be an image they could relate to.

 

Until i had lived there, i wouldnt have understood it either.

 

Thus, focussing on the main part of the poem, rather than the intro, it sums up australia pretty well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Not quite!

 

She wrote it when she was 19 and on a visit to England with her family.

She travelled a lot with her father but always lived in Australia. She built her famous house on Pittwater in 1925 and died in Paddington, Sydney in 1968. :yes:

 

You might be thinking of PL Travers who did leave Australia when young and never returned.

 

I stand corrected. Should have googled.

 

100% wrong on every statement :laugh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I was brought up on Marmite but I'm learning to like Vegemite. Still prefer Marmite though if I'm honest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×