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hope73

Moving to NSW in Oct 2016. So many questions.

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I've been on here before as we've been toying with the idea of moving for a while but we now have a deadline and are definitely doing it as having been there last March we are craving the sunshine and those beautiful beaches in Port Stephens are calling our names.

But I have so many questions so any help would be appreciated.

When and how to tell the kids (8 and nearly 5)

When and how to tell the inlaws???!!!! (Have to remember it's OUR life, not theirs).

We want to sell up and rent then apply for jobs in person once over there - is this a good idea? (I have a brother there).

Is there anything we should consider buying up to take with us that's cheaper or better in the UK?

Should we rent or get a holiday home long term before buying?

Any recommendations re which parts of Port Stephens are best?

How difficult is it for children to get into schools there?

Are primary teaching jobs difficult to get?

My husband works in IT in the building industry so we are hoping he could commute to Newcastle.

I am under the impression that winters really aren't cold in NSW - that's correct isn't it?

The beaches in Port Stephens are utterly stunning (and we honeymooned in the Maldives). Please tell me your kids do NOT get tired of a day at the beach.

Most importantly, WILL I COPE WITH THE SPIDERS??????????????????????

 

 

We are not imaging a utopia - same sh!t, shinier shovel. We know we'll have to work and that life is still expensive out there but we are hoping to be more active as a family and to simply spend more time outdoors because when it's cold we're just not great at getting outside.

The UK education system worries me hugely as so many schools are being taken over by academies which in my opinion are too formalised. Could anyone tell me how the Aus education system compares?

Are we naiive to think we'll lead a simpler, healthier lifestyle whilst still having to work hard?

 

Any advice appreciated. Thank you in advance.

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Port Stephens is a lovely spot and a lot of people do commute from there to Newcastle.

 

It's a seasonal destination so if you arrive outside school holidays, you could negotiate a very good rate on a holiday rental for a couple of months. I wouldn't worry too much about trying to sort out which area to live in - you'll get a much better idea once you're there.

 

I have no idea whether kids get tired of the beach, but you've also got bush walks, dolphin watching, boating, sand boarding on the dunes, etc ...

 

Winters are not cold by UK standards but you'll be surprised how fast you acclimatise. I didn't bother with any kind of heating for the first two winters, but by the third I was out buying a heater, and replacing all the jumpers I gave away when I left the UK!


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, is due out August 2022

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Primary teaching jobs are few and far between all over Australia. As I have said on a lot of posts so far.... there is a huge over supply of Australian trained teachers, in addition to migrants. A reflection of this is teaching becoming gradually removed from the lists that qualify for a visa. Be aware also that to teach here you will need to have 4 years of university education, so for the majority of UK trained teachers this means their 3 year bachelors plus at least 1 year of post grad. You will also need to have completed a minimum of 45 days supervised prac when you undertook your training.

 

As for winter in NSW, as soon as you are acclimatised you will find it just as cold as the UK. Make sure you bring all the usual winter attire.

Edited by Tickled Pink

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I am interested in the answer of how to tell the parents/in laws too!!? This is probably my biggest hurdle regarding moving!

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Winters just as cold? How about just as miserable, wet, dreary and long? Surely not? I'm a Kiwi originally and I found the NZ winters really harsh and REALLY cold but they were bright and sunny. I don't find winter in the UK that cold, just super dreary and grey.

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Re the spiders, they're really not that bad, I have had much bigger spider issues here in the UK than I ever did in Oz. I'm sure there are more spiders here than in Oz. You'll probably find the cockroaches worse, especially on the coast, make sure you get some cockroach baits in that first shop ;)

Winters are not as cold but the biggest difference in they are much much much shorter - really just a couple of months of blurgh weather. July (winter) on the Central Coast can be Tshirt weather. It rains though. You get more rainfall in Sydney than London, because when it rains, it really rains, but it may rain solidly for two weeks but could be followed by months of blue sky sunshine. None of this day after day after day of grey sky drissly awfulness! You're not likely to have central heating so I'm sure you'll want to buy a heater.

In my experience, some things are cheaper, some more expensive, and it really just depends on what you value and how you like to spend your time and money. You definitely won't find castles, art galleries and museums or M&S ready meals but you should be able to find a really nice quality of life that isn't so easily found over here. But, it all depends on what you personally value, which is different for everyone. I would say there are more opportunities here but your quality of life is better there.

You are right to say that you will have to work, I think many people think you can just sell up your average home in the UK, buy a mansion at Bondi Beach and never work again, but you should just find everything just a bit easier :)

Cars are more expensive, petrol is a lot cheaper. Food probably compares but there's more free stuff to do because the weather is better. Property is expensive but I think you get more for your money. BB and telephone will be cheaper and better here in the UK along with TV, but with any luck you won't need 500 Sky TV channels as you'll be outside BBQing with your new friends instead :)

Have you thought about renting your property here rather than selling? Easier to come back if it's not your thing.

Will your kids get bored of the beach? - again, depends on what they like to do but I grew up in Sydney and had a fabulous childhood with only fond memories and was never bored. Can't comment on the schools as it was some time back that I went to school and any experience wouldn't be relevant now.

Good luck

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Re the spiders, they're really not that bad, I have had much bigger spider issues here in the UK than I ever did in Oz. I'm sure there are more spiders here than in Oz. You'll probably find the cockroaches worse, especially on the coast, make sure you get some cockroach baits in that first shop ;)

Winters are not as cold but the biggest difference in they are much much much shorter - really just a couple of months of blurgh weather. July (winter) on the Central Coast can be Tshirt weather. It rains though. You get more rainfall in Sydney than London, because when it rains, it really rains, but it may rain solidly for two weeks but could be followed by months of blue sky sunshine. None of this day after day after day of grey sky drissly awfulness! You're not likely to have central heating so I'm sure you'll want to buy a heater.

In my experience, some things are cheaper, some more expensive, and it really just depends on what you value and how you like to spend your time and money. You definitely won't find castles, art galleries and museums or M&S ready meals but you should be able to find a really nice quality of life that isn't so easily found over here. But, it all depends on what you personally value, which is different for everyone. I would say there are more opportunities here but your quality of life is better there.

You are right to say that you will have to work, I think many people think you can just sell up your average home in the UK, buy a mansion at Bondi Beach and never work again, but you should just find everything just a bit easier :)

Cars are more expensive, petrol is a lot cheaper. Food probably compares but there's more free stuff to do because the weather is better. Property is expensive but I think you get more for your money. BB and telephone will be cheaper and better here in the UK along with TV, but with any luck you won't need 500 Sky TV channels as you'll be outside BBQing with your new friends instead :)

Have you thought about renting your property here rather than selling? Easier to come back if it's not your thing.

Will your kids get bored of the beach? - again, depends on what they like to do but I grew up in Sydney and had a fabulous childhood with only fond memories and was never bored. Can't comment on the schools as it was some time back that I went to school and any experience wouldn't be relevant now.

Good luck

 

Thank you for your helpful reply. Much appreciated.

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We're on track to move in Nov/Dec!

There's still so much to do but at least hubby is properly on board now!

 

I am concerned about finding a rental property with a cat in tow - plus they are SO expensive!

Our cat will be in quarantine for ten days so we'll need to find a rental as soon as possible as we'll be staying with my brother initially and I don't think it's a good idea to try to settle her into his house and then a rental.

 

What's very annoying is I have seen the perfect house online (at a good price) that I would buy tomorrow if I could!

How do people manage the move with pets?

 

Weirdly as well our kids will probably go straight into the Aus 6 week summer hols, which will actually be a nice way to settle them in after the stress of the move. At least they can spend days on the beach rather than going straight into a classroom and I won't have to rush to put them into schools.

 

Online information about Nelsn Bays is quite sparse. I'm glad I have been there before and have family there (although they're not THAT helpful!).

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We're on track to move in Nov/Dec!

There's still so much to do but at least hubby is properly on board now!

 

I am concerned about finding a rental property with a cat in tow - plus they are SO expensive!

Our cat will be in quarantine for ten days so we'll need to find a rental as soon as possible as we'll be staying with my brother initially and I don't think it's a good idea to try to settle her into his house and then a rental.

 

What's very annoying is I have seen the perfect house online (at a good price) that I would buy tomorrow if I could!

How do people manage the move with pets?

 

Weirdly as well our kids will probably go straight into the Aus 6 week summer hols, which will actually be a nice way to settle them in after the stress of the move. At least they can spend days on the beach rather than going straight into a classroom and I won't have to rush to put them into schools.

 

Online information about Nelsn Bays is quite sparse. I'm glad I have been there before and have family there (although they're not THAT helpful!).

 

I don think you are going to have any trouble finding a rental to take a cat. People will not typically advertise being pet friendly, so don't look for that, although obviously don't bother with the ones that specifically say no pets either. But feel free to ask about a cat anywhere that doesn't say anything.

 

Renting with a cat was our biggest worry before we moved too, but it was no trouble at all. Quarantine was longer when we moved, 30 days I think so there was less pressure on timings. I would not assume you willbe able to find somwhere and move in within ten days though, so I would look into kennels for the cat just in case.

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Thank you for your reply. Juggling the move with a cat in tow is really worrying me!

I think the quarantine is about 3 hours drive away from where we'll be as well. How often did you visit your cat?

Did you find your cat settled in ok?

I can't even imagine how cats cope with the flight! But leaving her behind and rehoming her also breaks my heart as well. Difficult to know which is the least selfish option for her. I would be gutted to have to leave her behind as she is completely adorable.

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I can't even imagine how cats cope with the flight! But leaving her behind and rehoming her also breaks my heart as well. Difficult to know which is the least selfish option for her. I would be gutted to have to leave her behind as she is completely adorable.

 

I think you know, deep down, that rehoming her is the least selfish option. Cats are far more independent than dogs and are able to bond to a new family much more easily. You're the one who will grieve when you part, not her. Whereas coming to Australia, you'll have to put her through a lot of stress and then once she's in Australia, you'll have to restrict her movements more than in the UK (unless she's already an indoor cat). So it's your decision just don't pretend you're doing it for her! :)

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, is due out August 2022

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I think you know, deep down, that rehoming her is the least selfish option. Cats are far more independent than dogs and are able to bond to a new family much more easily. You're the one who will grieve when you part, not her. Whereas coming to Australia, you'll have to put her through a lot of stress and then once she's in Australia, you'll have to restrict her movements more than in the UK (unless she's already an indoor cat). So it's your decision just don't pretend you're doing it for her! :)

 

She's not an indoor cat at all and to be honest it would be easier all round if we didn't take her but she is the most adorable cat I've ever had and she has so much personality so leaving her is very, very difficult. Rehoming seems very selfish but so does putting her through all that stress. I wouldn't even consider taking her if she wasn't a young cat (only just turned 3). Husband says rehome her.

Anyway, we're still waiting for his Visa to come through (via me being a Kiwi) so I guess we've got a lng road ahead yet.

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She's not an indoor cat at all and to be honest it would be easier all round if we didn't take her but she is the most adorable cat I've ever had and she has so much personality so leaving her is very, very difficult. Rehoming seems very selfish but so does putting her through all that stress. I wouldn't even consider taking her if she wasn't a young cat (only just turned 3). Husband says rehome her.

Anyway, we're still waiting for his Visa to come through (via me being a Kiwi) so I guess we've got a lng road ahead yet.

 

Hi Hope,

 

My friends moved from Sydney to Adelaide with their cats and then relocated back to London, bringing the cats with them. Similar to yourself did not want to let them go. They were indoor cats and now roam outside in the back yard in London.

They have recently moved to a new home and the cats still wander around outside.

 

If you decide to take the cat, maybe look to get another one when she turns up to give a her a play pal and initially keep her indoors for a bit till they both settle.

Edited by evets
typo

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Hi Hope,

 

My friends moved from Sydney to Adelaide with their cats and then relocated back to London, bringing the cats with them. Similar to yourself did not want to let them go. They were indoor cats and now roam outside in the back yard in London.

They have recently moved to a new home and the cats still wander around outside.

 

If you decide to take the cat, maybe look to get another one when she turns up to give a her a play pal and initially keep her indoors for a bit till they both settle.

Keep them indoors anyway. Cats do so much harm to the native wildlife, and its generally accepted that they are far more indoor animals than in the UK.

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My husband works in IT in the building industry so we are hoping he could commute to Newcastle.

 

 

Another thing for you guys to consider, is the IT job market in Newcastle. It it pretty tough outside of Sydney and Melbourne, and even then still tough in those cities.

Have you done any research to see the jobs available and what he could potentially apply for?

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She's not an indoor cat at all ...Rehoming seems very selfish

 

Why does rehoming her seem selfish? Like I said, it's the least selfish thing you can do, if she's used to being an outdoor cat. By bringing her to Australia you're putting her through the stress of being confined during the flight and quarantine, and then when she gets to her Australian home she still won't have her freedom - cats cause so much damage to Australian wildlife if they're allowed to roam. She'll have to be locked indoors from before dusk to after dawn every night, and restricted to your garden all day.

 

I suspect you will end up bringing her anyway, as I know how tough it is to part with a beloved pet. Just don't pretend you are doing it for her - the truth is that she won't miss you as much as you miss her, and rehoming will give her a better lifestyle than moving to Australia.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, is due out August 2022

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Appreciate your direct response re our cat. I now definitely think she'd be happier if we rehomed her. She catches loads of creatures on this side of the globe so best to leave her here! Everyone she meets falls in love with her so rehoming her shouldn't be too difficult.

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Another thing for you guys to consider, is the IT job market in Newcastle. It it pretty tough outside of Sydney and Melbourne, and even then still tough in those cities.

Have you done any research to see the jobs available and what he could potentially apply for?

 

He's open to a new challenge as am I. I'm a primary teacher and i don't hold high hopes for getting a job in that sector.

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Appreciate your direct response re our cat. I now definitely think she'd be happier if we rehomed her. She catches loads of creatures on this side of the globe so best to leave her here! Everyone she meets falls in love with her so rehoming her shouldn't be too difficult.

 

I know it will break your heart to say goodbye to her, but it is really for the best. Well done you! In Australia there is so much endangered wildlife and if you're an animal lover, you'll appreciate the need to protect them.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, is due out August 2022

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She's not an indoor cat at all and to be honest it would be easier all round if we didn't take her but she is the most adorable cat I've ever had and she has so much personality so leaving her is very, very difficult. Rehoming seems very selfish but so does putting her through all that stress. I wouldn't even consider taking her if she wasn't a young cat (only just turned 3). Husband says rehome her.

Anyway, we're still waiting for his Visa to come through (via me being a Kiwi) so I guess we've got a lng road ahead yet.

 

Take her! She will be absolutely fine on the flight like every other cat she will be asleep for most of the trip and ten days in quarantine is nothing, cats stay that long in catteries when people go on holidays all the time. It can be hard to rehome a cat and she could be sat in RSPCA kennels for months like thousands of other cats that people dump because they are moving. Even if you do find her a home yourself, cats do not like change, she might not settle and could end up there anyway.

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He's open to a new challenge as am I. I'm a primary teacher and i don't hold high hopes for getting a job in that sector.

 

I hope so... And sorry to hear that, but at least you are not believing it is going to be easy. Good luck with your move and I do hope everything works out for you both.

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