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LukeM

Get dad's mum to Aus?

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Just wondered how we go about doing this now, and how easy it is to do?

 

We are citizens and wondering whether it's possible to bring my dad's mum over. She's living on her own currently. Finding it increasingly hard to travel. She's just turned 70 and we felt it might be something to look into for her benefit if we were able to sell her house in the UK (we own it anyway) and bring her over here.

 

i think it would be better for us all in the long run. I've not really followed the forums since I got here and became a citizen so I've come crawling back for advice hehe :P


"Is that Luke... as in Luke Skywalker?" | Brisbane, Australia since August 2010 :cool:

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At 70 does your grandmother actually want to leave all she knows and loves and travel to a foreign country on the other side of the world? Most people want to spend their declining years in their own familiar place. Might be easier for you to trek her over but might not be what she wants. I'm approaching that age and would be very miffed if my family started arranging my life to suit themselves! If she decides she wants to move (frozen pensions and all that) then she can get a Contributory Parent Visa quite easily - costs around $50k

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Mmmm while I understand your point of view, unfortunately she's not got anyone there. She lives alone and doesn't socialise with anyone - even immediate family including her brother and sister. She would rather be with us - whether that means her being here or us being there. She has a lot of mental and physical health issues and as I said we all know she would rather be here with us. It certainly wouldn't be easier on us but it would be easier on her.

 

$50k is a lot. I don't think we would be able to afford that. I was just curious about options.


"Is that Luke... as in Luke Skywalker?" | Brisbane, Australia since August 2010 :cool:

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I don't know a lot about this visa, but I think you still have to pass the balance of family test - does your dad have siblings?

 

You mention that your gran has a lot of mental and physical issues - there is a medical to undertake and like other medicals it is assessed on if the person will need any care/community services and what cost. It may be worth seeking the advice of a registered migration agent who deals with applications where health concerns may be an issue. George Lombard is mentioned regularly as specialising in this particular area.


I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

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With mental and physical issues you definitely need to seek an opinion from one of the agents who specialize - George Lombard or Peter Bollard are the two usually mentioned but she may well fail the medical if she is likely to cost the Aus tax payer a lot of money.

 

Maybe a better option would be to talk to her about moving into sheltered accommodation if you're not prepared to go and support her. If your dad is an only child that really sucks (wearing the t shirt!) and there is no cheap, magic answer!

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At 70 does your grandmother actually want to leave all she knows and loves and travel to a foreign country on the other side of the world? Most people want to spend their declining years in their own familiar place. Might be easier for you to trek her over but might not be what she wants. I'm approaching that age and would be very miffed if my family started arranging my life to suit themselves! If she decides she wants to move (frozen pensions and all that) then she can get a Contributory Parent Visa quite easily - costs around $50k

 

Most people may want to but it's not always possible, after my mam died I did rather railroad my dad into moving to Scotland - why? My mam was his carer and it was a case of me taking over that role or a care home. My dad had not been out the house for 18 months and day to day he saw no-one other than my mam. My life would have been a lot easier if he had gone to a care home but despite the upheaval for him I do not believe it would have been better for him. As you're fond of saying it is sometimes the 'least worst' choice and for my dad that was to move close to me.

 

I have to say I'm glad I wasn't in Australia when all this happened. I have a friend back in the UK at the moment with a terminally ill parent, it is really the worst of times. For those of us too young to retire and children to consider it is not always possible to move to where the elderly parent is.

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Is your gramma financially dependent on you or your Dad?

 

I am not sure if the 838 visa will get a bridging visa but could be an option. Current processing times are like 30 years or something but if she gets a bridging visa then that won't really matter.

 

https://www.border.gov.au/Trav/Visa-1/838-

 

Make sure you or your dad are financially secure before this big move. "We can work it out" is a good attitude in life but without a big picture and prior financial commitments this can be a very costly (financially and emotionally) exercise.


Too easy, mate.

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Is your gramma financially dependent on you or your Dad?

 

I am not sure if the 838 visa will get a bridging visa but could be an option. Current processing times are like 30 years or something but if she gets a bridging visa then that won't really matter.

 

https://www.border.gov.au/Trav/Visa-1/838-

 

Make sure you or your dad are financially secure before this big move. "We can work it out" is a good attitude in life but without a big picture and prior financial commitments this can be a very costly (financially and emotionally) exercise.

 

If the Grandmother is a UK resident the 838 would be almost impossible due to the existence of the welfare state. On e can't prove dependence when there are pensions and benefits available.

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If the Grandmother is a UK resident the 838 would be almost impossible due to the existence of the welfare state. On e can't prove dependence when there are pensions and benefits available.

 

You are probably right. The dependence can also be partial and depends on how much she gets from the state and if the OP or his dad have been contributing to her financial needs on a regular and significant basis.


Too easy, mate.

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Is your gramma financially dependent on you or your Dad?

 

I am not sure if the 838 visa will get a bridging visa but could be an option. Current processing times are like 30 years or something but if she gets a bridging visa then that won't really matter.

 

https://www.border.gov.au/Trav/Visa-1/838-

 

Make sure you or your dad are financially secure before this big move. "We can work it out" is a good attitude in life but without a big picture and prior financial commitments this can be a very costly (financially and emotionally) exercise.

 

Is there still medical requirements to be met on this visa? The OP has said grandma has lots of medical and mental health issues


I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

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Is there still medical requirements to be met on this visa? The OP has said grandma has lots of medical and mental health issues

 

Yes, medicals still needed but the processing time on these visas is so long(current estimate 30 years), gramma will be a centurion before the application ever hits a CO.

 

AFAIK, medicals are not needed for a bridging visa.


Too easy, mate.

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There are strategies avail able to deal with the issues raised. I suggest that the OP should consult a registered migration agent.


Westly Russell Registered Migration Agent 0316072 www.pinoyau.com

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Hmmm was only really an idea, thought I'd look into it for them. We don't really have the kinds of money to deal with it and she certainly doesn't have 30 years left in her... I'd bet 4 or 5 tops, so that 838's out of the question.

 

She does have a pension, yes. She's not dependent on anyone financially (that I'm aware of). Oh and someone asked before if my dad has siblings - no, he doesn't. Both my parents are their parents' one and only child.


"Is that Luke... as in Luke Skywalker?" | Brisbane, Australia since August 2010 :cool:

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Hmmm was only really an idea, thought I'd look into it for them. We don't really have the kinds of money to deal with it and she certainly doesn't have 30 years left in her... I'd bet 4 or 5 tops, so that 838's out of the question.

 

She does have a pension, yes. She's not dependent on anyone financially (that I'm aware of). Oh and someone asked before if my dad has siblings - no, he doesn't. Both my parents are their parents' one and only child.

 

As wrussell is a migration agent and suggests there are strategies then getting some professional help sounds like a good idea before you rule it out.

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