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How has Australia changed your health?

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8 minutes ago, scousers said:

Been here 32 years my parents followed 26 years ago. My mum has chronic heart failure . She was told in high school she would never marry and would not make 20. She married had two kids both times had heart attacks and spent full pregnancies in hospital. When she came to oz 26 years ago the UK doctors gave her two years. Well she us now 85z had three mital valve replacements in her life. I do think aus conditions have helped her enourmously.

me, on the other hand have had depression since the day i arrived. I am 35 kg over weight. In the uk my nick name was skinny lizzie. I was so active in the uk. Never ever watched tv. Put it this way, i have never seen an episode of coronation street. Ive seen the cat walk along the wLl but then i went out doing so many things every night. Here i am in front of the tv 24/7. I have never found anything to interest me here. Aus has been great for mum, disastrous for me.

Hi Scousers. This is so sad to hear and it sounds like your mental health really hasn't been managed effectively. Where are you based if you don't mind me asking?

I am a consultant physician In the last 18 months have had to have periods of time off work for emergency treatment and a fairly lengthy admission for acute management of my major depressive disorder. My treating team here in Brisbane have been fabulous and I think it is fair to use the term "life saving" when it comes to the management I have received. I'm pretty sure I wouldn't have made it through in UK.

The weight gain though, what a nightmare! Some of the drugs used make you just want to eat almost compulsively for the reward mechanism. You can be starting to get pain from eating so much but still think some raisin toast and jam would hit the spot! I find being pretty strict with myself wrt exercise is essential but I've slipped a bit the last fortnight.

I think it is important to be open with problems like this. I don't wanna be anyone's rockstar! But, it does help people to see that you can get through those dark times when you feel nothing positive is ever going to happen to you and moreover that you don't deserve it to.

Do drop me a pm if you want to chat further about anything. I'm not going to go into full story or anything here but if there's anything I can do to help then I'd be happy to try. It really is never to late to make a change.

I've never seen an episode of Corrie either...

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On 15/12/2015 at 21:47, kevsan said:

 

Is that due to hayfever? Have found Melbourne to be oppressive at all. Tend to go out at about 6am or after about 7pm for my runs, except for the the 8am group on a saturday and usually pretty pleasant other than the damm flies.

I've just been for a run in the snow. The cold tugs at your lungs a bit but it's not too bad.

In Perth we would get up at 5 am, out by 6am to train. Cycle up the hills and back. Do over a hundred k and be back by ten before the heat hits.

Then you spend the rest of the day in the pool or at the beach if the surf was up.

It takes a bit of commitment, but it's certainly possible. You have to adapt to your climate.

Edited by newjez
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Nearly there! Don't drop the ball now guys! Vaccines are weeks away. Stay safe!

 

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On 20/12/2015 at 23:30, MelbourneTractor said:

 

That's only true if you have a predisposition to osteoarthritis.

 

If you're a healthy weight and take a sensible approach to exercise (i.e. regular but not excessive) than there's is no evidence to support the idea that running alone can cause knee pain.

I actually have a knee injury from cycling, which running helps deal with. Something about the muscles pulling differently on the knee. I'm a firm believer in doing a variety of activities.

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Nearly there! Don't drop the ball now guys! Vaccines are weeks away. Stay safe!

 

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I have been living in Australia for only 4 years and I can say that my health has hardly changed, the only thing is that I started to eat better here and I think because of this I started to get sick a little less often.

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Haven’t been a sickly weedy little pom like I was in Blighty.  Clean air, far better food, and continuous training made a huge difference.  Problem with CKD five decades later, but that’s more to do with where I went to school in South Australia.

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I got diagnosed with Leukaemia when I lived in Oz 

my white blood levels where undetectable after a year on medication, that’s as good as I’m going to get health wise 

back here ( uk) they never really stabilised and have got to worryingly high levels

a Chinese accupuncturist said leukaemia thrives in damp conditions I live in one of the wettest areas in the uk 

so be interesting to see if anything changes wen I’m back in Oz !

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On 04/03/2021 at 04:32, Sea breeze said:

I got diagnosed with Leukaemia when I lived in Oz 

my white blood levels where undetectable after a year on medication, that’s as good as I’m going to get health wise 

back here ( uk) they never really stabilised and have got to worryingly high levels

a Chinese accupuncturist said leukaemia thrives in damp conditions I live in one of the wettest areas in the uk 

so be interesting to see if anything changes wen I’m back in Oz !

Best of luck on your return and health. 

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16 hours ago, Bulya said:

Best of luck on your return and health. 

Thank u very kind of u 

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On 07/02/2021 at 21:19, scousers said:

Been here 32 years my parents followed 26 years ago. My mum has chronic heart failure . She was told in high school she would never marry and would not make 20. She married had two kids both times had heart attacks and spent full pregnancies in hospital. When she came to oz 26 years ago the UK doctors gave her two years. Well she us now 85z had three mital valve replacements in her life. I do think aus conditions have helped her enourmously.

me, on the other hand have had depression since the day i arrived. I am 35 kg over weight. In the uk my nick name was skinny lizzie. I was so active in the uk. Never ever watched tv. Put it this way, i have never seen an episode of coronation street. Ive seen the cat walk along the wLl but then i went out doing so many things every night. Here i am in front of the tv 24/7. I have never found anything to interest me here. Aus has been great for mum, disastrous for me.

It’s so mixed isn’t it? My son suffers from MH issues and has had excellent support - a lot of luck, but suspect he would have been abandoned in the UK. I am getting older now (nearly 60) and find my anxiety very hard to manage. I am a different person in the UK - I get a lot of strength from being outside, by the beach, walking with friends, popping in to a friendly pub for a half of local bitter. In 14 years I  have not really made any friends close enough to go walking with. I don’t like drinking to excess or eating to excess which is the social life on offer in Brisbane. I do go to excellent gym classes but so fed up with being inside. In my suburb nearly every beautiful piece of green is being concreted over to build expensive houses. I have to drive every day on busy roads and that stresses me. The concrete banality of Brisbane stresses me. Sometimes I struggle to keep it all together when I get a serious panic attack. Anti-depressants make me woozy so my only escape is sleep. Hubby sleeps when home from work, then we eat then bed by 9pm. It’s a pretty diminished life really and I’m not getting any younger but my family love it here and I can’t leave them.

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1 hour ago, Chortlepuss said:

It’s so mixed isn’t it? My son suffers from MH issues and has had excellent support - a lot of luck, but suspect he would have been abandoned in the UK. I am getting older now (nearly 60) and find my anxiety very hard to manage. I am a different person in the UK - I get a lot of strength from being outside, by the beach, walking with friends, popping in to a friendly pub for a half of local bitter. In 14 years I  have not really made any friends close enough to go walking with. I don’t like drinking to excess or eating to excess which is the social life on offer in Brisbane. I do go to excellent gym classes but so fed up with being inside. In my suburb nearly every beautiful piece of green is being concreted over to build expensive houses. I have to drive every day on busy roads and that stresses me. The concrete banality of Brisbane stresses me. Sometimes I struggle to keep it all together when I get a serious panic attack. Anti-depressants make me woozy so my only escape is sleep. Hubby sleeps when home from work, then we eat then bed by 9pm. It’s a pretty diminished life really and I’m not getting any younger but my family love it here and I can’t leave them.

Anxiety and depression are bound to pull you down.  Thankfully I have never suffered from either.  Must be awful.  I would go stir crazy if I couldn't get out in the good fresh air every day.  It would seem that you and some of the other posters here on PIO are so homesick for the UK it's making you ill.  I don't know what to say really as you can't just pack up and go because your family are happy here and you can't leave them.  Just hope things improve for you.

Edited by Toots
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3 hours ago, Chortlepuss said:

It’s so mixed isn’t it? My son suffers from MH issues and has had excellent support - a lot of luck, but suspect he would have been abandoned in the UK. I am getting older now (nearly 60) and find my anxiety very hard to manage. I am a different person in the UK - I get a lot of strength from being outside, by the beach, walking with friends, popping in to a friendly pub for a half of local bitter. In 14 years I  have not really made any friends close enough to go walking with. I don’t like drinking to excess or eating to excess which is the social life on offer in Brisbane. I do go to excellent gym classes but so fed up with being inside. In my suburb nearly every beautiful piece of green is being concreted over to build expensive houses. I have to drive every day on busy roads and that stresses me. The concrete banality of Brisbane stresses me. Sometimes I struggle to keep it all together when I get a serious panic attack. Anti-depressants make me woozy so my only escape is sleep. Hubby sleeps when home from work, then we eat then bed by 9pm. It’s a pretty diminished life really and I’m not getting any younger but my family love it here and I can’t leave them.

You should be in the Southern highlands then.  Bowral, Exeter, Bundanoon, Robertson, Moss Vale, Berrima, Mittagong, Fitzroy Falls, Colo Vale, Hilltop, Sutton Forrest, Penrose, Burrawang, Wingello, and Canyonleigh.  Any of those would be better than Brisbane, or anywhere in Qld imho. 

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On 19/03/2021 at 09:25, Chortlepuss said:

It’s so mixed isn’t it? My son suffers from MH issues and has had excellent support - a lot of luck, but suspect he would have been abandoned in the UK. I am getting older now (nearly 60) and find my anxiety very hard to manage. I am a different person in the UK - I get a lot of strength from being outside, by the beach, walking with friends, popping in to a friendly pub for a half of local bitter. In 14 years I  have not really made any friends close enough to go walking with. I don’t like drinking to excess or eating to excess which is the social life on offer in Brisbane. I do go to excellent gym classes but so fed up with being inside. In my suburb nearly every beautiful piece of green is being concreted over to build expensive houses. I have to drive every day on busy roads and that stresses me. The concrete banality of Brisbane stresses me. Sometimes I struggle to keep it all together when I get a serious panic attack. Anti-depressants make me woozy so my only escape is sleep. Hubby sleeps when home from work, then we eat then bed by 9pm. It’s a pretty diminished life really and I’m not getting any younger but my family love it here and I can’t leave them.

Sounds like you should move to a nicer suburb if you can afford to? Maybe Kedron, Gordon Park, Wavell Heights kind of area where you can easily walk in the greenery, seek out bits of conservation areas etc. I don't find that drinking/eating to excess is the social life on offer in Brisbane: quite the opposite. There are stacks of outdoors activities and days you would want to be outside are far more numerous than in UK. 

Might be that some different medication or management strategies might help you. The mental health care here is excellent. do ping me a message if you'd like to discuss.

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On 19/03/2021 at 10:25, Chortlepuss said:

. I am getting older now (nearly 60) .... In 14 years I  have not really made any friends close enough to go walking with. 

Try signing up for the U3a.   I can't guarantee what it's like in Brisbane, but you've got nothing to lose (except the $40 joining fee).  The one in Melbourne City is full of people in their 50s and 60s and offers lots of activities - walking, a movie club, language classes, exercise classes etc.   Whereas I've seen other U3a's which are all people in their 70s and 80s and concentrate more on sedentary stuff. 

Note that due to Covid, this year's timetable isn't a true indication of what it's usually like, so do give it the benefit of the doubt.

https://www.u3abrisbane.org.au/

There's also a seniors organisation called Chirpy (yes, I know, what a patronising choice of name).  In spite of the name, it looks as thought it might be worth a try.

I'm told Probus is good too, but I've always thought of it as more of a businessmen's thing.

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, is due out August 2022

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On 13/12/2015 at 17:52, spangley said:

 

 

  • Has the climate cut on seasonal illnesses?
  • Has the outdoor lifestyle helped to improve your general fitness?
  • Does the different food and diet have an impact?
  • Does the extra sunshine lift your mood and sense of wellbeing?

 

 

😀

I know this is an old post from 2015, but I see it is still active in 2021.

Not read every answer yet though

And it is an interesting question I think, not one you normally see on such forums

The answer is a resounding YES to every question 

So I will wade in too and say my pennies worth:

1). From childhood, I have suffered with respiratory issues, and I seemed permanently sick for weeks on end, with one malady or another in the UK winters.

Whilst I still occasionally get bronchitis and pneumonia here, the bouts are greatly reduced from when I got sick in the UK. In the UK, I got them every year and several times a year without fail. Here I get them every five years or so. Here I get flu only once a year normally around November (seems odd to have in summer I know, but naturopath said quite common due to change of seasons) and it is pretty mild.

2). Yes. I do a lot more outdoor activities now (that I never did in the UK). Swimming in waves (better workout than swimming in a pool), paddle boarding, jogging, walking, yoga, pilates, snorkelling, etc...  

3). In the UK, I had a very bad diet. Lots of processed foods and takeaways. Lots of fry ups. Lots of cola. Lots of suet style puddings. Lots of sitting round drinking endless cups of tea and eating hobnobs. Here (especially during the warmer weather) I eat lots of salads, eat lots of fruit, have fresh fish steamed (rather than deep fried), freshly cooked prawns (rather than prawn cocktails), lots of fresh vegetable juices and water. I totally avoid what I use to have in the UK. Australian wines are brilliant too, and much nicer than the horrible Blue Nun and weird Italian fizzy stuff that I use to drink in the UK. 

4). Yes. Warm and hot weather always lifts my mood. I use to love the summers in the UK, but they were too short. I hate the snow to live in on a practical level - frozen pipes, having to spend 20 minutes defrosting your car, slipping over on black ice (looks lovely on Xmas cards though) and I suffer greatly in the cold, so not sure how I survived 1969 - 1995 winters in the UK. 

It is quite interesting to me, some of the Aussies I work with, hate warm weather and love the cold. Whereas I hate the cold and love warm weather. 

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I definitely do more outdoor excercise, just earlier in the day in summer.  Many migrants seem to come for the weather then moan about it being too hot! One even said to me recently they never went to Spain in the summer as they didn’t  like the heat! They seem to be trapped indoors in aircon when it gets into the high 20s just as I am off to the beach. It isn’t usually humid in Adelaide either so not as oppressive as the UK.

My husbands mood used to be affected during the long dark winter in the UK so he is much happier here with more blue skies.

 

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So many wineries ......so little time :yes:

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Australia is often said to be very bad for asthma, eczema and hayfever. Sadly i am a sufferer.

Some people may find it worse here than in the UK depending on where exactly you end up living.

Edited by Parley

Buy a man eat fish. The Day, Teach Man, to lifetime.      - Joe Biden.

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17 minutes ago, Parley said:

Australia is often said to be very bad for asthma, eczema and hayfever. Sadly i am a sufferer.

Some people may find it worse here than in the UK depending on where exactly you end up living.

You're right. 

On the East coast, the weather is warm and in summer, it's always slightly humid (and sometimes a lot humid!).   Heaven for a dust mite is humidity with a temperature of 20 degrees or above, and then they multiply like crazy (and there are no cold winters to kill them off).   Also, warm humid weather encourages mould.  Elsewhere in Australia abounds in grass and tree pollens from native species. 

If you're not allergic to dust mites, pollen or mould, then you're not going to have any problems.  Unfortunately, many asthmatics are allergic to exactly those things. As a result, Australia is often labelled as "the asthma capital of the world".

I spent my first year in Australia in country Victoria.  I'd suffered from asthma since I was three, but I had grown out of it in my 20s, and I had no trouble with it in Victoria.  I was able to get health insurance and income protection insurance with no waiver.  Then I moved to Sydney and all hell let loose.  

I eventually got my asthma under control, but only by being on constant medication.  I agonised over what to do, but I was reluctant to give up the great life I had in Sydney, so I stuck it out - for over 30 years.  I did think about moving every now and then, but by that time I'd got used to living with my daily preventer routine and I valued my lifestyle too much to give it up. 


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, is due out August 2022

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19 hours ago, Marisawright said:

You're right. 

On the East coast, the weather is warm and in summer, it's always slightly humid (and sometimes a lot humid!).   Heaven for a dust mite is humidity with a temperature of 20 degrees or above, and then they multiply like crazy (and there are no cold winters to kill them off).   Also, warm humid weather encourages mould.  Elsewhere in Australia abounds in grass and tree pollens from native species. 

If you're not allergic to dust mites, pollen or mould, then you're not going to have any problems.  Unfortunately, many asthmatics are allergic to exactly those things. As a result, Australia is often labelled as "the asthma capital of the world".

I spent my first year in Australia in country Victoria.  I'd suffered from asthma since I was three, but I had grown out of it in my 20s, and I had no trouble with it in Victoria.  I was able to get health insurance and income protection insurance with no waiver.  Then I moved to Sydney and all hell let loose.  

I eventually got my asthma under control, but only by being on constant medication.  I agonised over what to do, but I was reluctant to give up the great life I had in Sydney, so I stuck it out - for over 30 years.  I did think about moving every now and then, but by that time I'd got used to living with my daily preventer routine and I valued my lifestyle too much to give it up. 

I may be allergic to dust and/or dust mites as I had an allergy test last year and dust was the only thing that came up. I thought I might be allergic to my cat (presently sitting on my lap.)

I hesitate to blame Australia on problems like anxiety because they might have appeared anyway. Leaving the family home to travel 10 000 miles then living in a huge city and a number of stressful jobs - well that might happened if I'd moved to London, something I always fancied doing.

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  • Has the climate cut on seasonal illnesses? - I have developed hayfever in Winter as my system does not get on with Australian natives and this is when they flower.  I have to take steroids to manage this. I have also developed chronic eczema in my ears caused by the Qld humidity. I sometimes wake up with ears full of flaking itchy skin but again steroid cream clears this up.
  • Has the outdoor lifestyle helped to improve your general fitness? Definitely not.  I used to walk ALOT in the UK but the Qld climate means it is often too unpleasant to walk long distances. I was back in the UK for 2 months last year and I got back into walking. If I want to exercise now, I go to classes or use equipment in air-conditioned gyms. The best outdoor exercise I can get here is gardening and I choose my times of day carefully.
  • Does the different food and diet have an impact? Again, I packed on the weight (at least a stone) within a year of moving to Qld but this was probably due to situational depression (self-medicating with wine) and my age (just turned 40 at the time). There is limited low priced diet focussed take away food on offer near workplaces.  Miss Boots and M&S in this regard. I take my own food in now to ensure I am eating well. 
  • Does the extra sunshine lift your mood and sense of wellbeing? Sometimes but I really hate the extreme weather in Qld when it can bucket down for days on end when there is a La Nina event and then we get no rain for months and my garden suffers.  I definitely prefer the definite seasons on offer in the UK/Europe.
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On 23/01/2022 at 11:58, Parley said:

Australia is often said to be very bad for asthma, eczema and hayfever.

Was just chatting about this yesterday

My Aussie husband use to suffer from bad eczema and hayfever.

He had it from birth until he was 40. When he was 40 he cleared the eczema, and the hayfever went away.

That was over 10 years ago, and not had it since.

 

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I have asthma and it's much better here than in the cold and damp of Manchester. I notice it a bit more on cold winter mornings if I'm going out for a ski paddle or a winter swim.

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On 24/01/2022 at 14:25, Loopylu said:
  • Has the climate cut on seasonal illnesses? - I have developed hayfever in Winter as my system does not get on with Australian natives and this is when they flower.  I have to take steroids to manage this. I have also developed chronic eczema in my ears caused by the Qld humidity. I sometimes wake up with ears full of flaking itchy skin but again steroid cream clears this up.
  • Has the outdoor lifestyle helped to improve your general fitness? Definitely not.  I used to walk ALOT in the UK but the Qld climate means it is often too unpleasant to walk long distances. I was back in the UK for 2 months last year and I got back into walking. If I want to exercise now, I go to classes or use equipment in air-conditioned gyms. The best outdoor exercise I can get here is gardening and I choose my times of day carefully.
  • Does the different food and diet have an impact? Again, I packed on the weight (at least a stone) within a year of moving to Qld but this was probably due to situational depression (self-medicating with wine) and my age (just turned 40 at the time). There is limited low priced diet focussed take away food on offer near workplaces.  Miss Boots and M&S in this regard. I take my own food in now to ensure I am eating well. 
  • Does the extra sunshine lift your mood and sense of wellbeing? Sometimes but I really hate the extreme weather in Qld when it can bucket down for days on end when there is a La Nina event and then we get no rain for months and my garden suffers.  I definitely prefer the definite seasons on offer in the UK/Europe.

So why live in QLD and not somewhere temperate in Australia?  

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On 24/01/2022 at 14:25, Loopylu said:
  • Has the climate cut on seasonal illnesses? - I have developed hayfever in Winter as my system does not get on with Australian natives and this is when they flower.  I have to take steroids to manage this. I have also developed chronic eczema in my ears caused by the Qld humidity. I sometimes wake up with ears full of flaking itchy skin but again steroid cream clears this up.
  • Has the outdoor lifestyle helped to improve your general fitness? Definitely not.  I used to walk ALOT in the UK but the Qld climate means it is often too unpleasant to walk long distances. I was back in the UK for 2 months last year and I got back into walking. If I want to exercise now, I go to classes or use equipment in air-conditioned gyms. The best outdoor exercise I can get here is gardening and I choose my times of day carefully.
  • Does the different food and diet have an impact? Again, I packed on the weight (at least a stone) within a year of moving to Qld but this was probably due to situational depression (self-medicating with wine) and my age (just turned 40 at the time). There is limited low priced diet focussed take away food on offer near workplaces.  Miss Boots and M&S in this regard. I take my own food in now to ensure I am eating well. 
  • Does the extra sunshine lift your mood and sense of wellbeing? Sometimes but I really hate the extreme weather in Qld when it can bucket down for days on end when there is a La Nina event and then we get no rain for months and my garden suffers.  I definitely prefer the definite seasons on offer in the UK/Europe.

As Bulya says, that's one part of Australia and probably only a place i'd like for some winter warmth, or for a 2 week beach holiday in the dry season.  South East coast or just inland has lower humidity, four seasons,  probably more sunshine and clearer days/nights than in the North East.  Spring and Autumn are glorious, Winter is great for cold walks and slow cookers but i avoid the snow and ski bunch, Summer probably my least favourite which i never thought I'd say.   In fact, the humidity inland can be so low in summer you need to spray saline up your nose to stop getting nosebleeds from dryness.  It makes a 40+ degree day feel a lot cooler than it would further north, though we've not had one for a few years.   

Yes, in summer people are out at 6am exercising before work, but in late afternoon with a common temperature drop of 15-20 degrees at night, it's fresh enough to go out again and walk without bucketing sweat...I like the vibe.  

The food i agree about, they've never really taken on fast processed food in supermarkets, though there are more things like pre-made sandwiches on sale now although it's limited and they do not sell crisps or Mars Bars alongside them!  Pret A Manger took a look here a few years ago and decided against opening up, they reckoned there was no market and they might have "done a Starbucks".  Much more attention is focussed on fresh ingredients, home cooking and bringing in your own leftovers for lunch unless you're restauranting.

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On 25/01/2022 at 12:37, BeachBabe2022 said:

My Aussie husband use to suffer from bad eczema and hayfever.

He had it from birth until he was 40. When he was 40 he cleared the eczema, and the hayfever went away.

I used to get hayfever in England every few years, but luckily have avoided it here and don't know why...different pollen?   The amount of pollen that comes down here is astronomical, we virtually have to hose it away and then wash all the garden furniture a few times in season.

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Posted (edited)
17 hours ago, beketamun said:

I used to get hayfever in England every few years, but luckily have avoided it here and don't know why...different pollen?   

Definitely different pollen.  People with hayfever and asthma are usually allergic to specific pollens, not all pollens.  

I remember when I worked at Stirling University, a few staff members had been forced to leave because their hayfever was so bad on campus - whereas they never had hayfever anywhere else.  The problem was caused because they had landscaped the grounds with a variety of exotic grasses, so they could be studied by the Biology Department.

So people who have hayfever or asthma in the UK may not experience it in Australia, and vice versa.  Or of course it may be worse, or better.

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband granted UK spouse visa March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

My new novel, A Dance With Danger, is due out August 2022

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