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Anyone felt the downturn yet?

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The construction industry is flat out in Sydney with labour shortages across all trades as a major city in the world it's a bit like London ,protected to a degree its own mini economy

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So far today been down to the markets at Eagle Farm racecourse which was busy and to the DFO outlet centre which seems to have doubled in size since my last visit and was packed. Not to mention the amount of building going on round the city. Seems to be booming more than it has since I got here.

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Guest Guest66881

One of our daughters went to the races yesterday, packed out she said lovely day was had and she won $80:wink:

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Honestly Paul if I didn't read about it on here, I wouldn't have any idea that anything had changed. Going about my day to day business nothing has changed .

 

If this forum is the only source of your information, what can I say?

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So all the new builds that are happening now with cranes on the skyline are just mirages then

 

I speak the truth of what I see

 

So many new ones planned that the cranes will be here for a long time

 

But maybe I'm wrong and you and a few others know better

 

I just know from what I see happening and all the new projects just been passed

 

Australia is a big place and its not all doom and gloom

 

Nice like bristolman :wink:

 

No they are what Wooba suggested. Construction lags considerably behind a downturn or worse as orders were drawn up in the height of better/good times. Perth would be judged the same. Building everywhere but things have seldom been worse. Wait until 2017 when many of the projects are completed and then comment on construction.

 

Here in Perth it is being suggested more apartment approvals will not get off the starting blocks as pre sales are not finding buyers.

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I work in the tertiary education sector in South Australia and I have noticed that the number of jobs advertised in this sector is about half the number as compared to two years ago. One University has amalgamated it's schools and research institutes meaning a reduction in staff, another is making staffing cuts and only advertising new jobs as one year contracts. However houses are still selling quickly in my area - usually only being on the market for a week or two.

 

I read the financial news so I am aware of the downturn and that it is particularly bad employment wise in SA but so far the general economy here still seems to be turning over. I do realise it takes a while for the effects to be felt so I am not too optimistic tbh.

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And?

 

The number of cranes in Spain was not indicative of the health of the Spanish economy. Money, often borrowed, was pouring into the country to invest in real estate that everyone thought was going to make them a quick Euro. Investors and builders all went to the wall and big banks were caught with their very large trousers down. It was financial stupidity on a grand scale and everyone didn't see it coming. The fall out still goes on today.

 

And thhe difference between that and the Australian economy is what exactly?

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And?

 

The Gold Coast is on the up it might not last but who knows, how longs a piece of string?

 

It'll at least be upwards until the commonwealth games

 

So much happening

 

Extending the light rail to Helensvale then hopefully to the airport

 

All onwards and upwards at the moment

 

Commonwealth Games will act as a catalyst for Gold Coast. And after? A small area will of course profit from a one of event. Much like Sydney a very low period after the 2000 Olympics. FNQ is anything but onwards and upwards.

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Ok I'm so sorry I even replied

 

I bow to your superior knowledge

 

I feel like its a competetion as for the likes and comments from certain members

 

I was only stating what I see every day and what has been hitting the headlines in the newspaper

 

The planned work is from Chinese investors who will not be going bankrupt

 

I'm only speaking about the Gold Coast not all of Australia as guess what I live here

 

I didn't mean to hurt your feelings but you did put the "why?" at the start of your reply to my comment so I explained what I meant by my original statement.

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Haven't felt it personally but I think Australia is a scary place to loose your job if you are over 50. Very ageist - especially Perth.

 

Probably even 45. Also without the connections harder at any age. Networking for personal gain the name of the game here.

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It's such a subjective thing to measure. I left a secure job and life in England in 1978, and then spent three months in three states fruitlessly looking for jobs in Perth, Adelaide, and Sydney, yet people tell me that it was a wonderful time to have come here.

 

I went back to England in 1983 having read about there being three million unemployed, riots in every English city, long queues of desperate Pommies at Australia House seeking visas to "escape" yet everything was as rosy as when I left England. And I got a job at the first attempt.

 

At some point in the early 90's I remember reading somewhere that Australia was in recession but I don't remember living through one.

 

Forward to 1996 and I return to England again, and get another job almost as easily as in 1983 - took me two weeks this time.

 

Then I return to Sydney to live at Xmas 2008, and ever since it's been hard for me to find a job, although if I was prepared to do bar or cafe work, I'd never be out of work.

 

The Pommie geologist in that article made big money for a few years and he should have been salting away a big hunk of it, as should the others. I imagine some did and others blew it all. If he's a geologist and work has dried up in OZ, well wouldn't that be the case in other resource-rich countries. Alternatively, as Australia went down, they would go up, and he'd move with the work, which is nothing new for many workers.

 

I don't know if things are bad here in Sydney? I just 'live' as I always do, spending too much money going out, it's true, otherwise I'd be "on time and under budget."

 

Don't know if you realised, but that pommie geologist is me!

 

First, yes we had savings. But, we used a big chunk of that to build our first home - the first brick was laid the day I was made redundant. The rest has been used to keep us afloat for nearly 18 months after earning next to nothing.

 

Yes, work has dried up in minerals internationally. But, in the UK we can work as engineering geologists - a bit like civil engineers - and there are plenty of jobs for that at the moment and it is what a number of my friends are now doing who would normally by out exploring for minerals. But, Australia doesn't recognise us for that sort of work. In the UK there is also a huge demand for geologists in environmental work that simply doesn't exist in Australia.

 

As for other work. I have averaged 200 applications a week. In that time I have managed 1 interview which I didn't get because they felt I was over qualified. The issue geologist and some other professionals have is that companies in other fields assume we will leave as soon as we can get a job again as a geologist. In other cases the are simply now masses of people applying for the same job. We had a branch of Masters open up where I live. They had nearly 10,000 applicants. A shelf stacking job at Woolworths I applied to had over 200 applicants.

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Something of concern is that the mining boom has been partially replaced with a construction boom but that also seems to be slowing down. We have to really find something to replace the mining boom or bring it back.

 

When the dollar falls further we can become a 'cheap' destination for rich developing world tourists. We can become the 'new' Thailand. Once we perfect the smile of course, from the Land of Smiles. Supplementing that we can sell our education as a fast track to migration. (at an inflated price of course)

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When the dollar falls further we can become a 'cheap' destination for rich developing world tourists. We can become the 'new' Thailand. Once we perfect the smile of course, from the Land of Smiles. Supplementing that we can sell our education as a fast track to migration. (at an inflated price of course)

 

Well you always do complain about the price of stuff right flag? So good news then...?

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Well you always do complain about the price of stuff right flag? So good news then...?

 

Good news? How exactly? A lowering of the dollar will make us ever poorer. Not cheaper for us. Benefiting middle class Asian folk as Australia becomes a cheaper 'playground'. Be that in taking holidays, education or buying houses.

 

I have a distinct sense that you really don't get it.

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We squandered our wealth.. it's time for someone else to squander theirs. It was only a matter of time until Australia was no longer the top-dog in the region. We have neither the population, nor command the kind of political supremacy.. and honestly, we probably don't have the stomach for it against heavy-weights like China and Japan.

 

This idea that Asia are a continent of "developing" poor countries that need our guidance in the region is a bit of a misnomer. There is a larger middle class in Shanghai alone than in all of Australia and if you visit these cities... they function on a scale that makes Aussie towns look like the wild west.

 

They have shunned the relics of the past and are very much living in the 21st century.

 

They now just need to sustain that growth domestically... or they could go the way of Japan in the 90's and plunge into decline.


We all live wherever we feel the most smug, I mean, snug.

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Good news? How exactly? A lowering of the dollar will make us ever poorer. Not cheaper for us. Benefiting middle class Asian folk as Australia becomes a cheaper 'playground'. Be that in taking holidays, education or buying houses.

 

I have a distinct sense that you really don't get it.

 

But you were complaining that even the Swiss(I think that was the nation) found Perth was extortionate and it was holding back tourism...

 

Now you seem to have flip flopped on that to stay negative side of the fence now the dollar has changed...

 

Nice attempt to talk down to me though...

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Don't know if you realised, but that pommie geologist is me!

 

First, yes we had savings. But, we used a big chunk of that to build our first home - the first brick was laid the day I was made redundant. The rest has been used to keep us afloat for nearly 18 months after earning next to nothing.

 

Yes, work has dried up in minerals internationally. But, in the UK we can work as engineering geologists - a bit like civil engineers - and there are plenty of jobs for that at the moment and it is what a number of my friends are now doing who would normally by out exploring for minerals. But, Australia doesn't recognise us for that sort of work. In the UK there is also a huge demand for geologists in environmental work that simply doesn't exist in Australia.

 

As for other work. I have averaged 200 applications a week. In that time I have managed 1 interview which I didn't get because they felt I was over qualified. The issue geologist and some other professionals have is that companies in other fields assume we will leave as soon as we can get a job again as a geologist. In other cases the are simply now masses of people applying for the same job. We had a branch of Masters open up where I live. They had nearly 10,000 applicants. A shelf stacking job at Woolworths I applied to had over 200 applicants.

 

 

if you have applied for nearly 200 jobs per week there must be work about,maybe not in your chosen field but work never the less so is it as bad as some are making out ?

I am not having a go here I fully sympathise with anybody looking for work it's one of the worst feelings in the world, having experienced many ups and down times in the uk (I have worked in construction all my working life ) it sounds like it was in the uk with hundreds of people applying for 1 or 2 jobs, , would you consider moving over to the east coast ? , hope you get fixed up soon and good luck

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But you were complaining that even the Swiss(I think that was the nation) found Perth was extortionate and it was holding back tourism...

 

Now you seem to have flip flopped on that to stay negative side of the fence now the dollar has changed...

 

Nice attempt to talk down to me though...

 

A bit of a dumb reply I'm afraid to say in the nicest of ways, naturally as not to offend your sensitivities in talking down to you further. But really, whether a Swiss finds Perth cheaper or not is of no consequence to me. What an amazing thing to think it would be otherwise. I don't flip flop. Try and keep up. Others found Perth exceedingly expensive. I tend to agree. The falling dollar will make it cheaper for them. Not me. It will mean poorer if anything with declining interest rates. Things remain for now at any rate expensive but so does overseas.

 

I wonder if you savvy now?

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if you have applied for nearly 200 jobs per week there must be work about,maybe not in your chosen field but work never the less so is it as bad as some are making out ?

I am not having a go here I fully sympathise with anybody looking for work it's one of the worst feelings in the world, having experienced many ups and down times in the uk (I have worked in construction all my working life ) it sounds like it was in the uk with hundreds of people applying for 1 or 2 jobs, , would you consider moving over to the east coast ? , hope you get fixed up soon and good luck

 

Why should it be suggestive of anything? He may be cold calling? Usually when job hunting the searcher reaches out of spec to as many possible outcomes as possible. No matter how remote. No indication of the job market but of hope and wishful thinking.

 

Actually a return somewhat to more normal Perth conditions, when securing a job was not easy.

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A bit of a dumb reply I'm afraid to say in the nicest of ways, naturally as not to offend your sensitivities in talking down to you further. But really, whether a Swiss finds Perth cheaper or not is of no consequence to me. What an amazing thing to think it would be otherwise. I don't flip flop. Try and keep up. Others found Perth exceedingly expensive. I tend to agree. The falling dollar will make it cheaper for them. Not me. It will mean poorer if anything with declining interest rates. Things remain for now at any rate expensive but so does overseas.

 

I wonder if you savvy now?

 

I'll keep pointing out your contradictions thanks, like when you lied about visiting Brisbane which contradicted your previous posts. You get very touchy when I do though...

 

So maybe you should try and be balanced rather than just being on the negative side for the sake of it.

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Why should it be suggestive of anything? He may be cold calling? Usually when job hunting the searcher reaches out of spec to as many possible outcomes as possible. No matter how remote. No indication of the job market but of hope and wishful thinking.

 

Actually a return somewhat to more normal Perth conditions, when securing a job was not easy.

 

when somebody says they are applying for up to 200 jobs per week that to me implies that it's not all doom a gloom there are jobs out there as I said may be not in your chosen field but work never the less, if it's as bad as some are saying then surly there would be no work what so ever, if you lived back in the uk during the early 80's you would be lucky to see half a page of job adverts ( outside of London) I could count on one hand in nearly 20 years of actually seeing an apprenticeship advertised . As I said I wish the OP good luck in getting fixed up.

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when somebody says they are applying for up to 200 jobs per week that to me implies that it's not all doom a gloom there are jobs out there as I said may be not in your chosen field but work never the less, if it's as bad as some are saying then surly there would be no work what so ever, if you lived back in the uk during the early 80's you would be lucky to see half a page of job adverts ( outside of London) I could count on one hand in nearly 20 years of actually seeing an apprenticeship advertised . As I said I wish the OP good luck in getting fixed up.

 

To me it implies the opposite. Of course there are jobs out there but in declining number compared to demand. The WA economy is shrinking. No secret about that. Migration a third what it was to eighteen months ago. Rental properties at early 90's levels.

 

Is that not indicative to you that things are far from rosy on several fronts. I did happen to live in London in early eighties and had a mixed experience with jobs, But housing was still affordable. I'm not sure I see a similarity with 2015 Australia.

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I'll keep pointing out your contradictions thanks, like when you lied about visiting Brisbane which contradicted your previous posts. You get very touchy when I do though...

 

So maybe you should try and be balanced rather than just being on the negative side for the sake of it.

 

Another clown obviously. Never lied about Brisbane. Better try and attempting to catch me out an subject matter. Maybe you should just put some substance to your post and attempting to be smart and obviously falling front on your face. Not a great look.

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To me it implies the opposite. Of course there are jobs out there but in declining number compared to demand. The WA economy is shrinking. No secret about that. Migration a third what it was to eighteen months ago. Rental properties at early 90's levels.

 

Is that not indicative to you that things are far from rosy on several fronts. I did happen to live in London in early eighties and had a mixed experience with jobs, But housing was still affordable. I'm not sure I see a similarity with 2015 Australia.

 

Not sure what you don't understand , if someone says he is applying for 200 jobs per week there is work out there it it can't be total doom and gloom , .I have never been over to Perth so don't know the situation as it is, So besides mining what other major industries are over there ? How many are employed at the navel base looking after the sub fleet ? , it was inevitable that the mining would take a down turn nothing last for ever.

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And thhe difference between that and the Australian economy is what exactly?

 

I was just saying that crane activity is not necessarily a sign that all is rosy in the garden. There will be an over supply of apartments throughout most of the Australian cities by 2018, no one knows what the effect will be. Spain is in a league of it's own with 3.4 million empty homes, a third of Europe's total vacant properties.

Looking at what could go wrong even on a much smaller scale and for perhaps slightly different reasons is still a lesson to be learnt.

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