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Sydneynorthsider

Gap in CV due to moving to Australia - how to tackle this?

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Hi everyone!

 

I need some advice on how to tackle the gap in my CV that's getting bigger and bigger due to the fact that I am still looking for work.

 

I moved here in January. Last month I started doing some freelance work in a related field to my normal career (in which I have 15 years experience) which I have added to the CV. But that still leaves a 7 month gap I need to account for.

 

I certainly haven't been sitting on my bum all that time! I came here on a prospective marriage visa and planned a wedding for over 80 guests in just three months whilst also finding somewhere to live and moving in. (Wouldn't recommend doing all that together, by the way! It was very stressful.)

 

Plus there was looking after wedding guests from England, preparing the next stage of the visa as well as job hunting.

 

How did you explain your gap in employment - if you had one?

 

Any tips gratefully received! x

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I don't think a gap like that is all that big a deal given that you just moved to the other side of the world.

 

If you need to mention it on your CV then why not just classify it as simply "emigration". It's quite understandable that you had a lot on your plate at that time. And in any case, if you wished to elaborate, then you could do that in a covering letter or interview for any job application.


From Kilmarnock, now in Melbourne :-)

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Thanks for your reply! Just been reading a lot about gaps and how employers don't like them so probably just worrying a bit too much about it and adding it to my general 'must get a job soon' and 'does anyone ever acknowledge job applications in this country' frustration. x

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I gotta say, moving and planning a wedding in three months whilst not working doesn't sound like a big deal to me, I wouldn't make too much of that, might look like you can't do more than one thing at once!

 

But I also agree with the previous poster, that this is no big deal, I probably wouldn't go beyond saying that you were having some "me time" to get married, settle in, explore and enjoy your new surroundings.

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Thanks for your reply! Just been reading a lot about gaps and how employers don't like them so probably just worrying a bit too much about it and adding it to my general 'must get a job soon' and 'does anyone ever acknowledge job applications in this country' frustration. x

 

It's a gap with a very good reason, that's the main thing. :smile:

 

I hear that fewer and fewer employers acknowledge applications these days. They usually cover it with the "only successful applicants will be contacted" caveat. It keeps their costs down.


From Kilmarnock, now in Melbourne :-)

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Agree again with the other poster, it isn't normal for employers to contact every applicant for a job, there are simply too many. This is the case in UK as well. If you don't get a reply, move on, there is nothing heart warming about receiving a stock response telling you that "other candidates better suited the requirements"'or whatever.

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Bungo - Ha ha! WOW. Moving to the other side of the world, living with the in-laws, planning a wedding in three months, looking for somewhere to live and moving in, looking for work and getting my head round how things work here generally all add up to multi-tasking to the max to me, so your comment that it looks like I can't do more than one thing at once is a bit insulting, if I am honest. Actually, your opinion is what I am worried about from employers who might look at the gap and think the same thing. But there you go.

 

Suzukicottie - thanks for the supportive words! Hoping that employers look at it the way you have. x

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Bungo - Ha ha! WOW. Moving to the other side of the world, living with the in-laws, planning a wedding in three months, looking for somewhere to live and moving in, looking for work and getting my head round how things work here generally all add up to multi-tasking to the max to me, so your comment that it looks like I can't do more than one thing at once is a bit insulting, if I am honest. Actually, your opinion is what I am worried about from employers who might look at the gap and think the same thing. But there you go.

 

Suzukicottie - thanks for the supportive words! Hoping that employers look at it the way you have. x

 

Jo I think you have misread my post or missed the point so perhaps read it again more slowly. I thought I made it perfectly clear that I think there is nothing wrong with your break, I think having some time out is good and healthy. Life is to be enjoyed, I think most people and employers would think good on you. My point is to simply admit that you took time for yourself to get married, enjoy yourself and appreciate your surroundings, not over egg how much hard work it was to move and get married.

 

We are all migrants on here, we all know what is involved. I have moved internationally twice. The first time, was four weeks after my own wedding and both move and wedding were organised whilst I was in full time work. The second time I organised my move with three weeks notice, got house ready for rent, moved one container, two adults, three cats, flew in on Thursday and started work on Monday. So you see it is perfectly possible and that is why I just wouldn't recommend you go overboard on how hard it is.

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It's only a few months, nobody will care.

 

Can Just say you fancied a 6 month career break to enjoy the new country before starting work again.

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"I gotta say, moving and planning a wedding in three months whilst not working doesn't sound like a big deal to me"

 

Read it again slowly and, yep, I came to the same conclusion.

 

Never been out of work before and it's a bit soul destroying, to be honest. I don't think I am going overboard - just worrying that someone won't be able to understand the gap. That's all.

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"I gotta say, moving and planning a wedding in three months whilst not working doesn't sound like a big deal to me"

 

Read it again slowly and, yep, I came to the same conclusion.

 

Never been out of work before and it's a bit soul destroying, to be honest. I don't think I am going overboard - just worrying that someone won't be able to understand the gap. That's all.

 

You really are determined to read things the wrong way aren't you?

 

Let me try again. If i were interviewing someone and they told me that they had a seven month gap because they moved country and planned a wedding and did not feel they could hold down a full time job at the same time, I would be worried about them. Because no it isn't a big deal, people do that all the time.

 

If I were interviewing someone and they told me that they fancied some time off to enjoy their wedding and new surroundings, I would think nothing of it at all. I would take my hat off to them in fact and wish I could have done the same.

 

The only thing I have suggested to you on this thread, that you seem to have taken great offence to, is that you follow the second strategy not the first.

 

Anyway, I will leave you to it. You keep on making a big deal over it, like you are the only person in the world that ever got married or migrated, perhaps your propensity to take offence at someone giving up their time to try to help you is also putting people off you..

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Just be honest. When we came over we had a 4 month break staying with relies and having a holiday travelling around oz. I never had a problem getting a job and no one ever asked me about it

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Hi everyone!

 

I need some advice on how to tackle the gap in my CV that's getting bigger and bigger due to the fact that I am still looking for work.

 

 

 

I'd just acknowledge it. Call it a sabbatical.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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When we emigrated we both deliberately took a year off to move, get a house, sort out schools etc. Plus we deserved a break after 25 years work! I got the first job I applied for with no questions asked about the gap on my CV. Chill out and enjoy the break, you won't get another opportunity for a long time! Good luck with the job hunt.

Edited by Addy

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When I look at a CV I don't care if there's a break as long as there's a reason (that can be "travelling", or "had children" or whatever, it actually gives us something to break the ice with at interview). The things we don't like to see is someone who has jumped between companies regularly; if you have a history of up and leaving every two years we probably wouldn't take the chance with you.

 

Don't worry about it.

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When I look at a CV I don't care if there's a break as long as there's a reason (that can be "travelling", or "had children" or whatever, it actually gives us something to break the ice with at interview). The things we don't like to see is someone who has jumped between companies regularly; if you have a history of up and leaving every two years we probably wouldn't take the chance with you.

 

Don't worry about it.

It can be a case that it was not your choice to "up and leave". In the early part of my sales career I was made redundant several times and also had reason to leave because job conditions changed. Each time I looked at the positives and added these to my skill set. Moving jobs can be a positive because it allows you to gain experience of different companies and work conditions.

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Maybe it is, maybe it isn't. When I review a CV I look for primarily the experience and qualification - bear in mind I'm in a technical field, things that are red markers to me are: lots of different jobs in a short time period (indicates little loyalty); over qualification for role (are we a filler job until something else comes along); anyone who mentions that they want to move into a role peripheral to what we do (you'll probably leave); applying for a role where you have lots of experience in an associated field, but none in what we are after (we'd employ you as a graduate equivalent, not as a senior).

 

Regardless of the circumstances, any of those are going to work against you on first view. It's why we have cover letters - to explain that sort of stuff, and you can spin them into positives by saying things like "opportunities to further my knowledge in another company came up"; it's perfectly acceptable for graduates or juniors, but if you got to senior or principal level and were still jumping around we'd wonder why.

 

It's perfectly fine to say you were made redundant, what we don't want to see is you jumped ship for another 50c per hour or something.

Edited by Eera

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