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UK -v- Australia

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Wife was main applicant who is a chemo nurse so that would explain ,thanks

we have since got our PR and more medical

Edited by Rallyman

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We had to have medicals for our 457 6 yrs ago and chest x rays? the kids did too, so did everyone my hubby knows ( several came from the UK company) who came over and friends we have met over here on 457 or know here, did too?

Although things change, you now have to have private health for 457s which we didnt have to have, so likely changed??

Edited by fairystar32

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It's not strange to me. We have PR (subclass 189). Still living in the UK.

 

Next year, we plan to move over to Australia, with me _possibly_ going first by myself for a month or 2. Our reasons are so I can get a job and/or be sure that it is secure(ish).

 

Everyone has there own reasons for doing things the way they do.

 

I don't think anyone is saying that it is odd for one person to go on ahead. What seems odd is that one partner doesn't know what visa they even have and seems to be still thinking about whether to go over or not. Most families will decide these things upfront.

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Far better than you I'd wager (it's my business) and not a failed migrant. God I hate losers!

 

How do you live with yourself ?


Loving life in Gods Country. Woohoo, look at me. 

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Just to set the record straight, we decided that it would be better for my OH to out first to make sure the job was as described and seemed, as far as he could tell, secure. I did not want to risk pulling my daughter out of school in the UK, whilst studying her GCSEs and then find out my OH did not like the job and we would be coming home again. We also have a house to sell in the UK so it was never going to be a simple as us all jumping on a plane at the same time. As for the 457, no, we did not have to undergo a medical but, as previously stated, we were required to take out full health insurance. I think we may have been slightly mislead over the PR situation and were told that it became permanent after 2 years.

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Just to set the record straight, we decided that it would be better for my OH to out first to make sure the job was as described and seemed, as far as he could tell, secure. I did not want to risk pulling my daughter out of school in the UK, whilst studying her GCSEs and then find out my OH did not like the job and we would be coming home again. We also have a house to sell in the UK so it was never going to be a simple as us all jumping on a plane at the same time. As for the 457, no, we did not have to undergo a medical but, as previously stated, we were required to take out full health insurance. I think we may have been slightly mislead over the PR situation and were told that it became permanent after 2 years.

 

A common misconception unfortunately. If the employer is willing to sponsor you for a permanent visa then it may be something to consider. The 2 year timeframe often mentioned is only a period after which there is no need to undergo a skills assessment when applying for PR employer nominated sponsorship. Nothing automatically converts to PR, you still have to go through a new application process. You can of course apply for a permanent visa at any time if you can pass a skills assessment, without the need to wait any longer.


From Kilmarnock, now in Melbourne :-)

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Just to set the record straight, we decided that it would be better for my OH to out first to make sure the job was as described and seemed, as far as he could tell, secure. I did not want to risk pulling my daughter out of school in the UK, whilst studying her GCSEs and then find out my OH did not like the job and we would be coming home again. We also have a house to sell in the UK so it was never going to be a simple as us all jumping on a plane at the same time. As for the 457, no, we did not have to undergo a medical but, as previously stated, we were required to take out full health insurance. I think we may have been slightly mislead over the PR situation and were told that it became permanent after 2 years.

 

As I have mentioned a couple of times, it is quite common for people to hear or believe that they will get PR "after two years". Lost count of number of times I have read that but it is utterly wrong. A temporary visa is a temporary visa and it always will be. General wisdom is that it is mad to sell a house whilst on a 457 visa too, most would rent it out, unless it is a house they would want to sell anyway.

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Thank you Suzukiscottie and Bungo for your responses. Yes, it would certainly make sense to rent our current house as opposed to selling and that thought had obviously occurred to us but as the rents are so expensive in Sydney whereas purchased property seems a lot more affordable, I thought it would be better to sell up and purchase in Oz. However, in light of the temporary visa not necessarily becoming permanent, it rather sheds new light on that situation. Therefore now seems the best option.

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If you get here and like it and your daughter starts looking for work here then Australian Qualifications are going to mean more than GCSE's.

 

We love it here. Best thing we ever did was move. When we emigrated the description we got from the Australian Embassy was a lot like the Algarve in climate but everyone speaks English, we drive on the left hand side of the road and I've felt more removed from the UK when we used to go to France.

 

We hadn't been before, just decided to come to Perth and thought a reccie trip would just waste money.

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Thanks Paul and I have to agree with everything you say up to a point but we are over 50 and therefore cannot emigrate so PM is our only option. I have since my last post received a response from Oz immigration who have told me that our only route for PM is for my OH to qualify under the Higher earners route which must be to earn a salary of at least $29,300 for a minimum of 4 years. He is about $20,000 shy of that so unless he can get the salary increased, I think we are stuffed. If we are forced to come back to the UK after 4 years, the Aussy qualifications will not mean a great deal for my daughter unless she can sit the IB in Oz and this is why I am not too sure it is going to work for us. Clearly if we could stay in Oz, the the Aussy school certificates would be much more appropriate but I just do not think that is going to be possible hence my indecision.

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Thanks Paul and I have to agree with everything you say up to a point but we are over 50 and therefore cannot emigrate so PM is our only option. I have since my last post received a response from Oz immigration who have told me that our only route for PM is for my OH to qualify under the Higher earners route which must be to earn a salary of at least $29,300 for a minimum of 4 years. He is about $20,000 shy of that so unless he can get the salary increased, I think we are stuffed. If we are forced to come back to the UK after 4 years, the Aussy qualifications will not mean a great deal for my daughter unless she can sit the IB in Oz and this is why I am not too sure it is going to work for us. Clearly if we could stay in Oz, the the Aussy school certificates would be much more appropriate but I just do not think that is going to be possible hence my indecision.

 

That is a new twist. And as well as having to earn the high salary for four years, it still needs the willing employer at the end of it as well. You couldn't get the permanent visa on the track record of higher salary, you would still need an employer willing to go through the sponsorship for a new permanent visa. Anything could happen in four years.

 

In your shoes, I would only push on with this plan if I had a nice financial cushion and was fully prepared to see it as an adventure and be happy to return at the end of four years.

 

And re your other post on housing costs, it is very expensive to rent or buy in Sydney.

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Just to set the record straight, we decided that it would be better for my OH to out first to make sure the job was as described and seemed, as far as he could tell, secure. I did not want to risk pulling my daughter out of school in the UK, whilst studying her GCSEs and then find out my OH did not like the job and we would be coming home again. We also have a house to sell in the UK so it was never going to be a simple as us all jumping on a plane at the same time. As for the 457, no, we did not have to undergo a medical but, as previously stated, we were required to take out full health insurance. I think we may have been slightly mislead over the PR situation and were told that it became permanent after 2 years.

 

I think you were very wise, especially as it's turned out you don't have guaranteed permanent residence. It's very common for one partner to go out ahead for exactly the reasons you mention - what confused people was that you didn't seem very well informed about the visa.

 

A 457 visa never "becomes" a permanent visa. You still have to apply for permanent residence (PR), and the same points rules etc apply as if you'd applied now. So if your oh can't qualify now, he won't qualify then either - unless you can qualify under the high earnings rule.

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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As I said earlier, it all happened very quickly and I think excitement may have overtaken practicality. We just went along with what we were told but subsequently have done a lot more research and realise that things are not quite as good as we first thought. However all is not lost as my OH is probably going to have a great time in Sydney and my daughter and I can look forward to some great holidays. If my OH can get the salary increased then we can look at things again.

 

With regard to the cost of purchasing a property, although the properties are expensive, they are far cheaper than renting. I also have enough equity in my English property to just about be able to afford one, so that is why I thought it quite a good option but not if there will be no PM. That would be a nightmare!

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With regard to the cost of purchasing a property, although the properties are expensive, they are far cheaper than renting. I also have enough equity in my English property to just about be able to afford one, so that is why I thought it quite a good option but not if there will be no PM. That would be a nightmare!

 

One obstacle to buying in Australia is the high cost of stamp duty, which can be as much as one or two years' rent! So you need to be sure you're going to be in Oz for a reasonable length of time, otherwise you'd be cheaper renting.

 

http://www.realestate.com.au/blog/stamp-duty-calculator/

 

You need to allow around $2,000 for costs at both ends (buying and selling) too.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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One obstacle to buying in Australia is the high cost of stamp duty, which can be as much as one or two years' rent! So you need to be sure you're going to be in Oz for a reasonable length of time, otherwise you'd be cheaper renting.

 

http://www.realestate.com.au/blog/stamp-duty-calculator/

 

You need to allow around $2,000 for costs at both ends (buying and selling) too.

 

Is the first time buyers grant still available? This covered pretty much all the costs involved back when we bought a house.If i remember correct it was around $15,000 if it was your first home in Australia.

 

Cal x


If you don't go after what you want, you'll never have it. If you don't ask, the answer is always no. If you don't step forward, you're always in the same place...

If you get a chance,take it, If it changes your life,let it. Nobody said it would be easy they just said it would be worth it...

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Is the first time buyers grant still available? This covered pretty much all the costs involved back when we bought a house.If i remember correct it was around $15,000 if it was your first home in Australia.

 

Cal x

 

Not to those on 457 visas I don't believe.


Counting down the days until we emigrate... 28th March 2016, Melbourne here we come...

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