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pmf1977

I knew there had to be a downside to this amazing country.

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Guest Guest66881

The constant glare from the warm sun:wink:

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Ours is cable. What you have to do is nag them and pester them at telstra. The capability is there, they just don't like passing it on!

They must have put in cable ducts for cable when they built the new housing estates in Oz, is it just they do not have the will to do cable...seems bizzare


Drinking rum before 11am does not make you an alcoholic, it makes you pirate..

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I found the downside to life in Australia. It's not deadly snakes or killer spiders (which I don't mind anyway as long as I don't get bitten).

It's service, or rather the lack of.

We waited nearly three weeks to get a phone line, broadband and a TV service connected.

 

 

The phone line took two weeks and iiNet sent me a bill even though they had not sent me a phone.

When the equipment came a week later, the router not router (it's the pronunciation not the spelling) was covered in scratches and dents and the phone came with the wrong charger.

 

 

We were just glad to have internet at last so I decided to buy my own router and return the equipment to iiNet for a refund.

20Mbps was the maximum speed I could achieve and there is a usage cap of 100GB (I would sometimes download more than that over a weekend in Blackpool with my Virgin Media 152Mb connection).

 

 

Anyway after receiving two more bills for periods that the service had not even been active, the TV service still was not working.

I had called up every few hours for three days and was told each time to wait a couple of hours and reset the box.

 

 

In the end I came to the conclusion that the technicians at iiNet either had no idea what they were doing or they were too busy throwing shrimps on the BBQ to care.

I called them up to cancel the service, which they did without question or hesitation in about ten minutes.

 

 

To finish I spent two hours in a live chat session to someone at another provider signing up and agreeing to wait another 10-16 days for them to take over the service and pay connection fees for the pleasure of them doing so.

(All connection fees were waived after I bored her with the story of my iiNet experience).

 

Perhaps you were unlucky. I don't recall any issues when we got set up, I think it took a few days, same as here really. Our mbps was many times faster in Sydney than it is here in the UK, 15-20mbps Aus versus 2-4mpbs UK (living i the countryside).

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It's as if they decided in Australia that the internet was never going to take off so there was no point investing in the infrastructure.

 

They did have a plan, the current Govt curtailed it because of costs, or more likely, Rupert Murdoch was worried about his satellite TV service being bankrupted by internet TV.

We've been left with a patchwork...fibre NBN areas right next to oversubscribed ADSL2 and a huge pause in infrastructure works. The only fibre areas being completed are the ones that contracts were signed for before the last election.

You can see the value of NBN...houses with it are quite a bit more expensive where i am, and suburbs are now being described as "non-NBN" if they haven't got it, as a detrimental thing.


"Nationalism is an infantile disease, it is the measles of mankind." Albert Einstein

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I read that hardly anyone is taking up the new NBN plans, so people are not interested in paying more just for it to be slightly quicker.

Could end up being a white elephant.


I want it all, and I want it now.

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flies ...

 

I know, where are all the spiders I was warned about by people in the UK.

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I know, where are all the spiders I was warned about by people in the UK.

 

 

mostly in in my bedroom and bathroom ...

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They did have a plan, the current Govt curtailed it because of costs, or more likely, Rupert Murdoch was worried about his satellite TV service being bankrupted by internet TV.

We've been left with a patchwork...fibre NBN areas right next to oversubscribed ADSL2 and a huge pause in infrastructure works. The only fibre areas being completed are the ones that contracts were signed for before the last election.

You can see the value of NBN...houses with it are quite a bit more expensive where i am, and suburbs are now being described as "non-NBN" if they haven't got it, as a detrimental thing.

 

Makes you wonder how we got by all those years without super fast internet doesn't it.:laugh:

 

We are with iinet, get fast enough speeds to download the odd movie, when we log on to our e-mail (infrequently) there are about 10,000 e-mails, 99% are crap and we just delete them. Might be one that is important enough to read and answer. Fast enough to stream the odd movie too. ADSL2 is what we have at the moment. The problems we have had are because the copper network is still owned and run by Telstra and is old. Iinet have their own DSLAMS in the exchange but can't do anything about the copper to your house. We can't talk directly to Telstra as we aren't a customer. We have to lodge a call with iinet who have to lodge a call with Telstra. Usually takes then a few days to get round to fixing things and every time we've had a problem it's been Telstra's copper network somewhere between our house and the exchange.

 

Believe it or not the TV does not have to be connected to the internet to get decent stations. There is a far superior method that's been used for years for TV transmission where you don't need miles and miles of very expensive fibre cable, connected to your house. There is a transmitter and an antenna on your roof, fraction of the cost of the NBN rollout.

 

 

Give yourselves a day off folks, switch your mobile off, don't look at your ipad and watch whatever's on free to air TV. The world won't come to an end.:laugh:

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mostly in in my bedroom and bathroom ...

 

cobwebs.jpg

 

Cobwebs.

cobwebs.jpg


I want it all, and I want it now.

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I read that hardly anyone is taking up the new NBN plans, so people are not interested in paying more just for it to be slightly quicker.

Could end up being a white elephant.

 

You're correct in that the Liberal's current copper plan is not well received and the technological advance might not be worth the money for some subscribers, who only need email and a web browser. However these are not the people who will shape the future, and investment is about the future.

Nobody sane would build anything to a minimum specification these days, with the pace of change and innovation faster than anything we've seen in history.

I just think some of these politicians are too long in the tooth and haven't got the brains or the capacity to understand. You've seen with the pitiful attempts to explain data retention technology that they haven't got the foggiest idea what they're talking about.


"Nationalism is an infantile disease, it is the measles of mankind." Albert Einstein

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We are with iinet, get fast enough speeds to download the odd movie, when we log on to our e-mail (infrequently) there are about 10,000 e-mails, 99% are crap and we just delete them. Might be one that is important enough to read and answer. Fast enough to stream the odd movie too. ADSL2 is what we have at the moment. The problems we have had are because the copper network is still owned and run by Telstra and is old. Iinet have their own DSLAMS in the exchange but can't do anything about the copper to your house. We can't talk directly to Telstra as we aren't a customer. We have to lodge a call with iinet who have to lodge a call with Telstra. Usually takes then a few days to get round to fixing things and every time we've had a problem it's been Telstra's copper network somewhere between our house and the exchange.

 

 

You explain the reason for a modern fibre network under single management. ADSL2 over here is a dreadful mess for the most part.

In the newest areas fibre is compulsory, copper has been switched off altogether.

Everything is over fibre : VoIP telephone, video conferencing, alarms, internet, EFTPOS.

You can get FTA or Foxtel if you like, nothings stopping Freeview and simple TV with adverts. But you're stuck with what you're given and that isn't what the younger generation want for work nor pleasure. Is it fair for the old luddites to hold the country back, because they don't understand it?


"Nationalism is an infantile disease, it is the measles of mankind." Albert Einstein

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We're in Darwin and where we live we couldn't get anything but NBN when we moved in as they are supposed to be switching it all over (last December and still not happened). We have a contract with iiNet and apart from having to wait about 3 weeks for it to be installed we've had good service and don't exceed our allowance with heaps of streaming, downloading and online uni seminars/lectures


Arrived in Australia on a working holiday visa 10/08/13 (to live with my partner), applied for De Facto Partner Visa 820/801 and granted bridging visa 09/07/14, last documents uploaded 22/12/14, contacted 09/07/15 by immigration and asked to have my medical done, medical completed 20/07/15, uploaded 27/07/15 and temporary partner visa (820) issued 27/07/15 :smile:

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You explain the reason for a modern fibre network under single management. ADSL2 over here is a dreadful mess for the most part.

In the newest areas fibre is compulsory, copper has been switched off altogether.

Everything is over fibre : VoIP telephone, video conferencing, alarms, internet, EFTPOS.

You can get FTA or Foxtel if you like, nothings stopping Freeview and simple TV with adverts. But you're stuck with what you're given and that isn't what the younger generation want for work nor pleasure. Is it fair for the old luddites to hold the country back, because they don't understand it?

 

It's all about cost though isn't it Slean. If I had the option on NBN, FTTP or ADSL2 at half the cost I would be going with ADSL2 for now. The government has the same call to make, can the country afford it? At the moment the answer is no.

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But if it's sticking $20,000 on a property value like it is here, the money has already been produced and going back into the economy?

 

I don't know about Perth costs but round here the cheapest NBN is $59.90 for 12 down /1 upload with a netphone and all local/national calls.

That's cheaper than i'm paying for ADSL2 when the line rental is $23 per month before the ISP costs get added, and like you it can be flakey, and no good for skyping on a Sunday night.

 

For 74.90 you can get 25/5 and 250Gb quota, which is quick enough for anything current and i doubt any ADSL2 can beat that anywhere, especially on the upload?


"Nationalism is an infantile disease, it is the measles of mankind." Albert Einstein

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But if it's sticking $20,000 on a property value like it is here, the money has already been produced and going back into the economy?

 

I don't know about Perth costs but round here the cheapest NBN is $59.90 for 12 down /1 upload with a netphone and all local/national calls.

That's cheaper than i'm paying for ADSL2 when the line rental is $23 per month before the ISP costs get added, and like you it can be flakey, and no good for skyping on a Sunday night.

 

For 74.90 you can get 25/5 and 250Gb quota, which is quick enough for anything current and i doubt any ADSL2 can beat that anywhere, especially on the upload?

 

Those prices are pretty good and would be on par with a lot of ADSL2. I'd be interested to see if that is paying the cost of getting the fibre in though and that it's not an offer to get people on it at a loss to the provider. Wouldn't be surprised at those prices. Which in the end means the tax payer is subsidising the NBN. It's the government who have to make the call as to whether the huge costs can be justified.

 

I know we have fibre in the ground round our suburb. Optus contractors put it there a few years ago. I know because they had to dig under our drive and I asked the guys what they were doing. As far as I know that fibre has never been used by anyone and I wouldn't be surprised if they have forgotten it's there. They made a real mess burrowing under our drive and putting the manholes in. I rang Optus and complained how they had put the gravel back and our drive was subsiding. Got the usual answer "they were contractors".:mad:

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The fibre is already provided and that is the only option, Telstra has been switched off so analogue services have been decommissioned. It's basically a box in your garage or house with the fibre running to it, then you just get it activated and a router stuck on the end. You can BYO, or buy one from NBN, depending on how good you need it to be.

 

You'd think that might lead to a closed market, but there are 80 ISP's competing to "provide" you the service having leased the right from NBN...and you don't have to sign a 12 or 24 month contract, so finally renters can get in on the action.

I guess a few ISP's will fall by the wayside on competition grounds.


"Nationalism is an infantile disease, it is the measles of mankind." Albert Einstein

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The fibre is already provided and that is the only option, Telstra has been switched off so analogue services have been decommissioned. It's basically a box in your garage or house with the fibre running to it, then you just get it activated and a router stuck on the end. You can BYO, or buy one from NBN, depending on how good you need it to be.

 

You'd think that might lead to a closed market, but there are 80 ISP's competing to "provide" you the service having leased the right from NBN...and you don't have to sign a 12 or 24 month contract, so finally renters can get in on the action.

I guess a few ISP's will fall by the wayside on competition grounds.

 

You're talking about Fibre to the premises though, I'm guessing new build places? The current government have gone with fibre to the node, a bit like foxtel where you end up with fibre to a "box" in your neighbourhood and then coax to your premises. A lot cheaper than FTTP but slower too. Still faster than ADSL2 but fast enough for just about anyone. Most schools and businesses that wanted fibre to the premises have been able to get it for years from Telstra, it cost them a bit though. Not in the schools case I guess as the local government would have paid.

 

There is a lot of Aus, including suburbs in the major cities that won't have access to fibre yet and it costs a lot to put in. Let alone the costs of country areas where the costs are astronomical, for a few users.

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