Jump to content

You're currently viewing the forum as a Guest
register-now-button_orig.png
and join in with discussions   
ask migration questions
message other members

..and much much more!

xelishaxcx

HELP!! Contributory Parent visa (subclass 143)

Recommended Posts

Hii

I am currently planning on applying for a skilled 189 Visa (Sorry i know this is far fetched but this is the only thing stopping me from emigrating)

I am a nurse and want to move out in Jan2016 with my partner.

The only thing stopping me is my parents. They want me to go but i dont think i can leave them if they cant follow me out there.

They will both be over the age of 50 and both with no skill.

People have told me that i cant sponsor them on my 189 so ive been researching about the subclass 143.

I know this visa would be many years down the line but if they cant get that then i dont think i could pluck up the courage to move.

Has anyone else been in this situation? and has anyone applied for the sublass 143??

Ive been researching cost ... wow!! how are people affording this visa??

my parents have a mortgage which will soon be paid off this year and so will own their house but seriously am i seeing correctly that its around £25k (english) per person for this visa???

Thanks for anyones help in advance!

Just hoping someone gives me the slightest bit of good news as i really want to emigrate!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ball park at the moment is around $100k for a pair so, yes, your sums are right - in coming years it will probably be even more. Add to that the cost of frozen UK pension (when the time comes) means tested Aus age benefits when and if they get to them and various other expenses like medical costs/insurance and a very limited time to set up a decent retirement pot - $100k is just the tip of the financial iceberg.

 

If if you want to emigrate, go for it! You've got your life, your parents have theirs!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, that's correct. It's about $50k AUD per person. It's common for parents to sell their family home to be able to afford to move over under the 143. There's no way my parents would ever be able to afford it, either - they still have a mortgage and it'll be another 20 years before they own their house! (They're 70 already).


Applied for PMV 300: 18 April 2013 (Washington, D.C.) Police Checks: Front-loaded. Medicals: 3 June 2013 Meds Referred: ? Meds Cleared: 8/2013 PMV GRANTED: 03 JAN 2014! Married: March 2014. Applied for 820: 28 April 2014. 820 GRANTED: 07 July 2014!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My parents mortgage finishes this June but they wont be able to move over for approx 3 years once i have been there for 2 years. They will make a bit of money from their mortgage but i just think the price of the visa is a joke!! especially when they have family living a working in the country xx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Australia doesn't encourage elderly migrants, and they've deliberately made it very expensive for those who chose to make the move.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ive been researching cost ... wow!! how are people affording this visa??

my parents have a mortgage which will soon be paid off this year and so will own their house but seriously am i seeing correctly that its around £25k (english) per person for this visa???

 

The answer is, most people can't afford it, so they don't. There is more bad news, too. Firstly, as time goes by it's likely that cost will keep on going up. Secondly, your parents will be able to claim their British government pension BUT whatever rate it's at when they claim, that's the rate it will stay at for the rest of their lives. People living in the UK get regular increases to keep up with the cost of living, plus other benefits too - they won't.

 

They probably have the money in their house, but the problem is - if they sell the house and spend that money, how will they manage to buy a house once they get to Australia? House prices in Australia are very high. Have you looked at the cost of housing where you're planning to go?

 

Australia has good reasons for charging those fees. People get more ailments as they get older. If your parents arrive in their fifties, they will work (and therefore contribute to the Australian tax system) for only ten years or so, but then they'll retire and be a burden on the health system for another thirty years. The fee is a way to redress that balance.

 

I think you need to ask yourself why you're emigrating, and whether that reason is really worth being separated from your parents. Take a look around these forums and you'll see that people who are very close to their family really, really struggle to be happy in Australia: the pain of missing family is just too much. Australia used to be the land of opportunity, but things have changed a lot in recent years and Australia isn't better than the UK now, it's just different, and it has its pro's and con's like any other country.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The logic is if the immigrant (you) wants your parents to come out - then you (the immigrant) pays for the visa instead of buying that first car. There are good reasons to have the cost soo high - they are going to cost the Australian tax payer quite alot of money and not put anything back into the economy. It doesnt play out with you saying you will be contributing to the economy - you are contributing to the economy to counteract what YOU will be costing the economy in aged benefits etc. Its interesting on this board as its the parents from mostly the UK funding the visa but Indian children are funding the visa for their parents to come over (and making the sacrifices themselves to fund it). Really if you feel you cannot come here without your parents, and they still have some working life left, I would say dont come. You cannot force your parents to live the life you want - you have to let them live their own life. You are the one who is wanting to move - and you are the one who will need to make the sacrifices.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My parents mortgage finishes this June but they wont be able to move over for approx 3 years once i have been there for 2 years. They will make a bit of money from their mortgage but i just think the price of the visa is a joke!! especially when they have family living a working in the country xx

You might think it's a joke because you personally want your parents to follow but to put it bluntly us as tax payers don't. We don't want to have to support someone who probably will not be able to get a job due to age or not have enough money to support themselves in their later years without putting a drain on our welfare systems. This is obviously a major deal for you as it has bean for many many others, so please please think long and hard because I reckon missing parents is probably the number one reason for people returning on here. Sorry if this sounds blunt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hii

I am currently planning on applying for a skilled 189 Visa (Sorry i know this is far fetched but this is the only thing stopping me from emigrating)

I am a nurse and want to move out in Jan2016 with my partner.

The only thing stopping me is my parents. They want me to go but i dont think i can leave them if they cant follow me out there.

They will both be over the age of 50 and both with no skill.

People have told me that i cant sponsor them on my 189 so ive been researching about the subclass 143.

I know this visa would be many years down the line but if they cant get that then i dont think i could pluck up the courage to move.

Has anyone else been in this situation? and has anyone applied for the sublass 143??

Ive been researching cost ... wow!! how are people affording this visa??

my parents have a mortgage which will soon be paid off this year and so will own their house but seriously am i seeing correctly that its around £25k (english) per person for this visa???

Thanks for anyones help in advance!

Just hoping someone gives me the slightest bit of good news as i really want to emigrate!!

. Hi,my daughter is a nurse and emigrated on a work visa,of course we didn't want them to go ,my grandaughters were 9 and 10 , but we told her to make her own life she went in 2012 and 4years down the line we have applied to join them,she has her per res ,are we mad I don't know but the visits over to visit are terrible knowing we have to leave and sky doesn't help no cuddles or kisses ,we don't have a lot of money so we sell up and rent and keep going till the money runs out! We are both in our 70,s and know the gov pension will not get. increase,so what i if we live for ten more years we might get Aussie help after all we are hiving them over $100,000!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, the visas are expensive but worth every penny if your parents like it here. I know mine are.

 

Of the $50k paid. $10k is AoS and you will get it back after 10 years (with decent interest). So really it is only $40k.

 

Unlike many western countries Australia at least gives parents a chance to join their children no such luck in many places including the UK, I believe.


Too easy, mate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Contributory places for 2015-16 is about 7175. At $43,600 a pop that is a cool $313 million. If each parent spends about $20k/year for living costs, which adds up to ~$143.5 million/year pumped into the economy or over the 10 year AoS period, a total of $2 billion (inflation and what not) pumped into the economy.

 

If 50% of the original applicants make it past the 10 year AoS period then a cool $2billion cash input to support 3,500 people for the rest of their potentially short lives. Not bad this "contributory" business.

 

Note: I am not condoning the high cost of visas but I am glad there is an option if one needs it bad enough.


Too easy, mate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yes, the visas are expensive but worth every penny if your parents like it here. I know mine are.

 

Of the $50k paid. $10k is AoS and you will get it back after 10 years (with decent interest). So really it is only $40k.

 

Unlike many western countries Australia at least gives parents a chance to join their children no such luck in many places including the UK, I believe.

Hi,we sent our application in on June. 2015 Cost about$3,400 next will be medicals ,police checks. Cost£600 then sponser to pay$14 ,000 (which she gets back after 10years) then the'biggy'$88,000 ,a lot of money,the time it takes(22-24months),for a visa to be processed gives plenty of time to change minds a dozen times,and if decide not to go only loose$3,400, if hadn't sent application off would still be dithering and have still 24months wait,I know we won't starve and we could live with daughter if have to , they ,we need our own space but not miles and miles away !!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Contributory places for 2015-16 is about 7175. At $43,600 a pop that is a cool $313 million. If each parent spends about $20k/year for living costs, which adds up to ~$143.5 million/year pumped into the economy or over the 10 year AoS period, a total of $2 billion (inflation and what not) pumped into the economy.

 

If 50% of the original applicants make it past the 10 year AoS period then a cool $2billion cash input to support 3,500 people for the rest of their potentially short lives. Not bad this "contributory" business.

 

Note: I am not condoning the high cost of visas but I am glad there is an option if one needs it bad enough.

 

 

 

yes- I think we should maybe recognise the fact that far from being a 'burden on the taxpayer' we parents contribute a lot of $$$ to the Australian economy- and are still working and paying taxes long after the extortionate visa costs ( btw much closer to $50k than the $40k someone quoted earlier - plus $10-14k also held for that long ten-year stretch).

 

I might not even consider it extortionate if there wasn't also a 2 year wait attached to it- they make us sweat for those visas!

In my case I'll also be working for probably the next 15 years (from the age of some people I've seen working they don't expect you to exit the workforce too early here) The only burden I can imagine ever needing is healthcare- and I certainly be won't be feeling any guilt on that score- we more than pay our way.

Edited by Freesia

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Xelishaxcx

 

We are prospective migrant parents and I sympathise with your wish to have your parents join you (eventually) but there are a few things you should know.

 

1) You need to be settled in the country for (I think) two years minimum before you can sponsor your parents to come over.

 

2) They need to pass the 'balance of family' test - i.e. they should have more of their children living in Australia than elsewhere. Have they? Our daughter is an only child, so there's no argument, but if you have siblings in the UK you wont be able to sponsor them.

 

3) There is a cheaper visa, the 103. This costs about 7000$ but - and its a big but - there is a waiting list of between 8 and 20 years, depending on who you listen to. This visa was withdrawn last year, then reinstated some months later, so it is not certain whether it will still be available in two years time.

 

4) You can do the contributory visa in two parts, paying half the 100000$ for a two year visa and then the other half to make it permenant two years later. This has the advantage of offering longer to get the money together and if they didn't like it, they could return to the UK with half the money saved.

 

5) If they jump through all the hoops and get to the top of whatever visa list they have joined, they have to pass a medical.

 

If they manage all this they can join you! I think its important to be realistic about the whole thing though - we keep saying that if only we'd applied for a 103 in 2007 when our daughter got PR we'd be at the top of the queue by now - but it takes time to consider such a massive move and we were very unsure about the possibility nine years ago!

 

When considering the expense, consider also the cost of visits. We are about to make our sixth visit and have spent about 30,000 pounds on Australia visits during the past ten years. We are now getting older and find travel insurance a) harder to obtain and b) MUCH more expensive.

 

While no country would actively encourage older immigrants - for the reasons already mentioned - I resent the (incorrect) assumption that older migrants contribute nothing. I'm quite sure we'll be expected to pay income tax, in addition to contributing to the economy by consuming the necessities of life! Furthermore, we 'oldies' have contributed a fully grown, educated and skilled adult to the Australian economy, the costs of their upbringing and education being born by ourselves and by governments elsewhere. So while I would accept the observation that we will contribute less to the Australian economy, so say that we will contribute nothing is wildly inaccurate.

 

Its a big decision for you to make, an even bigger one for your parents - but you shouldn't let anything put you off if you really want to give it a try. You may enjoy the life but decide to come back after a couple of years - its allowed :-) I say go for it, and good luck.


103 visa application lodged February 2013. 143 visa application submitted January 2016. Police checks and form 80 submitted February 29th 2016. Visa granted April 4th 2016.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In my case I'll also be working for probably the next 15 years (from the age of some people I've seen working they don't expect you to exit the workforce too early here) The only burden I can imagine ever needing is healthcare- and I certainly be won't be feeling any guilt on that score- we more than pay our way.

 

To keep it in perspective, though, I think you're underestimating the cost of your healthcare and aged care in your old age. By the time the average Australian needs major healthcare/aged care, they've been paying tax for at least 50 years - and I'm sure you wouldn't claim the government is making a profit from those people? In your old age, you'll be entitled to the same care as those Australians, yet you'll have paid tax for only 15 years. That's a big shortfall, which is what the visa costs seek to offset.

 

I do agree, though, that the waiting times are disgustingly long.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
We'll be paying taxes of one kind or another until the day we die.

 

... while contributing nothing, of course :wink:


103 visa application lodged February 2013. 143 visa application submitted January 2016. Police checks and form 80 submitted February 29th 2016. Visa granted April 4th 2016.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×