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The McAteers

Emigrating with an asthmatic toddler

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Hi everyone,

 

This is my very first post on here as we have just signed up with our agent to start the emigration process to NSW. Apart from the obvious huge list of questions and concerns I have, one of the biggest things (and reasons for moving) is my 2 year olds health. He has pretty sever asthma and is on 2 inhalers plus a tablet at bedtime. I was looking for advice from those that had emigrated with a child with asthma and how you found the medical care, was the therapy and treatment the same or similar to the UK. Was there a charge for prescirptions and also did you notice an improvement in their health?

I'd very much apprecaite any insights or informaiton anyone can provide.

Many thanks,

Julia

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Hello and welcome :)

 

I've found the asthma care to be fine here. No different from the UK really. Annual asthma review, see a GP when needed, inhalers the same.

 

Only difference is cost. A few inhalers set me back $40 plus a time.

 

As for have people found it improves their asthma here, some seem to find it does, others not from what I read on here. Can depend on the triggers I guess.

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Hi,

I don't have any experiences of children with Asthma, but I do have Asthma myself. I have visited Australia many times over the years and we are moving over in November. My personal experiences of time in Australia with Asthma are limited, but I have noticed over the years that my dependence on my inhalers reduced when in the country, to the point where I didn't need them any more, until I returned to the UK. It's not a definitive answer to your question, as all Asthma sufferers are different, there are different triggers etc.. Mine is often triggered by pollution, dust, perfumed candles and some pollens.. Hopefully your move will have a positive effect on your little one, but I would advise that you make sure you consult an Australian doctor prior to making any decisions regarding reducing Asthma medication, as I am sure you will be aware that this can be quite dangerous if done without proper medical supervision (sorry, don't mean to sound preachy).. Good luck with your future plans.. :chatterbox:


In sunny Townsville... :wink:

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We have 3 asthmatics in the family.Everyone has to pay for prescriptions including children.My family are all very well controlled and take preventives twice a day.We also have Vetolin but rarely need it.

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My son has asthma and the care here in Australia has been just the same as the UK though thankfully now he's older it's nearly disappeared. Our GP practice did regular reviews and so from my experience the care was no different and I didn't see any real improvement in his symptoms though his was triggered by colds and allergies to dust, animal hair etc which you still get over here! There is a charge for prescriptions - no free prescriptions for children here I'm afraid so can be costly.

 

Before we came to Australia though my daughter (aged 3 at the time) didn't have asthma but during the first spring here developed hayfever which resulted in several asthma attacks when she needed to be hospitalized so beware of hayfever! Funnily enough my son had bad hayfever in UK but nothing here.

 

Also I remember when we were applying for our visas - we're talking about 12 years ago now though so sure rules etc. have changed - because he had been in hospital with a severe attack we had to get him to see a pediatrician privately to write a medical report.

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I was under the impression that Ventolin Salbutamol inhalers could be bought over the counter, or at least I thought that to be the case in Perth?? Can anyone clarify this for me?


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I was under the impression that Ventolin Salbutamol inhalers could be bought over the counter, or at least I thought that to be the case in Perth?? Can anyone clarify this for me?

 

Yes, Ventolin inhalers can be purchased over the counter here in Perth, our local chemists vary from $6.40 - $9.60 for one. You do need a prescription for a preventative though, I was $39.30 for my husbands one yesterday.

 

As mentioned above it really does depend on what triggers your sons asthma? My husband hasn't found much difference to his asthma here compared to the other 4 countries we have lived in. But on the other hand, our 21 year old sons asthma is triggered by the cold weather, and he has to use his reliever a lot during winter here even with using his preventative twice a day?

 

Guess what I'm time trying to say is that it might make no difference to him, or it might. Everyone is different...

Edited by ScotsQuine

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Australia is ahead of the UK in terms of asthma management and education. For example, Australian schools carry salbutamol in their first aid kits and a large amount of money is spent on education of school staff around asthma first aid. Asthma Action Plans are encouraged and regularly reviews with the GP. Assessing asthma control is a key focus at the moment.

 

Improvement in health will really depend on the triggers and again whereabouts you move to. There are also seasonal triggers to watch for, bush fire smoke can cause a lot of problems here for people with asthma for instance.

 

Have a look at Asthma Australia's website for more information. There is a Foundation in every state and an Infoline. You can also sign up for Asthma Assist and receive newsletters etc.


It is not economical to go to bed early to save the candles if the result is twins - Chinese proverb

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This is my very first post on here as we have just signed up with our agent to start the emigration process to NSW. Apart from the obvious huge list of questions and concerns I have, one of the biggest things (and reasons for moving) is my 2 year olds health. He has pretty sever asthma and is on 2 inhalers plus a tablet at bedtime. I was looking for advice from those that had emigrated with a child with asthma and how you found the medical care

 

You will not have to worry about your son's medical care, because the treatment of asthma in Australia is the best in the world. In fact, the best clinic in the world is at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney, and the treatment there is covered by Medicare.

 

The downside is the reason for Australia's outstanding asthma care - it has the highest rate of asthma in the world! So you need to consider that. The reason is the very high rate of allergens: the climate in the Eastern states is paradise for dust mites and moulds, which many asthmatics are allergic to. The sub-tropical climate also enables a wide range of exotic plants and grasses, which have irritating pollens. So unless you're sure your son isn't allergic, I'd be scared of coming to Sydney, Brisbane or anywhere else in the East.

 

In the UK, I grew out of my asthma when I was 17 - but it came back again with a vengeance as soon as I set foot in Sydney. One of my British friends has just moved to Sydney after years of living in Spain - and is almost wiped out by severe hayfever and eczema.

 

If you are going to an area with a dry summer, it's a different story (except for the Northern Territory, where the extremely wet winters cause a huge mould problem). My grandfather had severe asthma all his life, but felt better in Perth than he ever had in Scotland. I was fine in the desert North of Victoria, though I'm not sure how I would have reacted to the coast there. Adelaide also has a dry heat.

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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I was under the impression that Ventolin Salbutamol inhalers could be bought over the counter, or at least I thought that to be the case in Perth?? Can anyone clarify this for me?

 

Yes they can, though if you're using it daily, you should be on preventers not Ventolin. Especially if it's children taking it, because every time you hear a wheeze, it's damaging the airways permanently. So these days, the approach is to stop the wheeze before it happens - which makes it more likely they'll grow out of it permanently.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Yes they can, though if you're using it daily, you should be on preventers not Ventolin. Especially if it's children taking it, because every time you hear a wheeze, it's damaging the airways permanently. So these days, the approach is to stop the wheeze before it happens - which makes it more likely they'll grow out of it permanently.

 

This is the best way to manage asthma.

My family very rarely need to use their Ventolin .

They are all on different preventers.Ranging in cost from $25 to $39 and doses from 2 puffs twice a day to 1 puff twice a day

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I think its different for people. My son suffered/ suffers with Asthma. He still does, normally the winter month's. The problem you have it can be so warm during the day and cold at night. I haven't found a good Dr at all since living here in Sydney. My son used to see a specialist every 3 months in the UK, he's not seen one since moving here 6 years ago. You need to go to a specialist to say that your child has got Asthma and normal Dr cannot do that. And I don't understand that at all. I expect its a money thing. Top up on inhalers in the UK..

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I think its different for people. My son suffered/ suffers with Asthma....I haven't found a good Dr at all since living here in Sydney. My son used to see a specialist every 3 months in the UK, he's not seen one since moving here 6 years ago. You need to go to a specialist to say that your child has got Asthma and normal Dr cannot do that. And I don't understand that at all. I expect its a money thing. .

 

Your son needs to see a specialist because asthma is a potentially very serious condition and it needs to be properly assessed by an expert. As you're in Sydney, you're in luck: tell your doctor you want your son referred to the Clinic at Royal Prince Alfred - it's the best in the world, and it's bulk-billed.

 

Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology Service (Allergy and Asthma Consultants)

Clinic location: Ground floor, Alfred Hospital, "Private Consulting Suites"

Ph: 9076 2934

 

http://www.sswahs.nsw.gov.au/rpa/allergy/introduction.html


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Your son needs to see a specialist because asthma is a potentially very serious condition and it needs to be properly assessed by an expert. As you're in Sydney, you're in luck: tell your doctor you want your son referred to the Clinic at Royal Prince Alfred - it's the best in the world, and it's bulk-billed.

 

Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology Service (Allergy and Asthma Consultants)

Clinic location: Ground floor, Alfred Hospital, "Private Consulting Suites"

Ph: 9076 2934

 

http://www.sswahs.nsw.gov.au/rpa/allergy/introduction.html

 

Thank you for giving me this info. My son is now 19 and after seeing the best specialist in the UK from the age of 6 months old. He and I both know how to control his Asthma. I find the Drs know nothing. and I find that very sad. My Dr controlled my son asthma all the time, not a hospital. Drs don't seem to care in Australia. JMO

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Thank you for giving me this info. My son is now 19 and after seeing the best specialist in the UK from the age of 6 months old. He and I both know how to control his Asthma. I find the Drs know nothing. and I find that very sad. My Dr controlled my son asthma all the time, not a hospital. Drs don't seem to care in Australia. JMO

 

Maybe it depends where you were. I found the knowledge of doctors here much better than doctors in Scotland. And I wouldn't suggest he needed to visit the clinic more than once - they give you an asthma plan and all the information you need to manage your asthma from then on. Once you have that plan, you don't need your doctor to "control" your asthma - it's controlled, and all the doc has to do is write the prescriptions.

 

And the clinic is at the hospital, like many specialist clinics here, you don't have to be admitted to hospital to use it.

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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My daughter has asthma, type 1 diabetes and brain cancer and I know where she gets the best treatment here in Melbourne. She is looked after a - z by the hospitals, she is now in her thirties and has been diabetic since she was 11, asthmatic since a baby and brain cancer at 24. I would worry if she returned to the UK and had to wait to see this one and that one. I always worry when she travels overseas.

 

I got diagnosed with Asthma myself 2 years ago and have no problems with my treatment either, referred to the hospital chest clinic, see a lung specialist privately and looked after very well.

 

If people jump around clinics from this one to that they can fall through the cracks but if you find a good doc you like and stick with him/her you get very good treatment.


Petals

:ssign15:taking no prisoners :wink:

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