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Water birth

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I've never heard anyone say they've forgotten the pain of labour. I remember mine as if it was yesterday and it was almost 38 years ago! Much the same as I remember the pain of a dislocated knee 5 or 6 times. The labour was a worthwhile pain....:wubclub:

 

I got through all three of my labours with nothing more than gas and air and not one swear word; when I broke my ankle I turned the air blue and needed morphine...

 

 

And yes Lady Rainicorn you're right, a TENS machine is another brilliant gadget.

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I'd recommend a TENS machine.

 

Dont nut plan too much. A friend of mine was set on a home water birth. She ended up getting rushed to hospital as the baby turned back round and was breech. Another went to the loo in the night and out popped the baby, another friend has pretty much just spent 48 hours in labour! It'll happen, it'll hopefully not hurt too much and you have a little baby at the end and everything is forgotten :-)

 

good luck x


Don't have regrets because you were too scared to try something.

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I agree with not planning too much. One thing we did include in my birth plan, was that I didn't want to be rushed in to making any decisions, unless in an emergency situation. I wanted to avoid a caesarian at all costs, and felt that the likelihood of that happening was maybe increased with some labour interventions.

 

With eldest, my waters went three weeks before my due date. I had wanted a water birth, so we went in to the midwife led unit at the hospital (after phoning to see what to do). I wasn't having any contractions at that time, so they sent me home to wait it out. The contractions started a few hours later, and by the time we had phoned the hospital to let them know we were coming, had made the almost hour long drive to the hospital, and been examined, they were coming thick and fast. I knew I didn't want pethidine, and when I tried gas and air it made me feel nauseous and completely out of control, so because the pain was so bad I asked for an epidural, meaning an end to my wishes for a water birth. After that I was quite comfortable, although I could still feel the contractions. When I was ready to push, it took almost three hours to push her out. Hospital policy was that they usually recommend intervention after two hours, but I begged them to let me push for longer. When the midwife examined me, the baby had her head twisted to the side (she could feel her ear), which is why it took so long.

 

With youngest I was induced on my due date for medical reasons. I found the pain far easier to cope with until the end. I asked for an epidural, but they decided to give me a spinal block, as I was so far along. In the event, the anaesthetist gave me the block, and walked around to speak to me, and my waters broke all over his shoes/legs! She was actually born very quickly after that, maybe three or four good pushes, and a slight panic from OH because the midwives had disappeared! I think I preferred the spinal because I didn't have to be catheterised, which I did with the epidural.

 

In any case, enjoy the last weeks of your pregnancy and time with a newborn, because before you know it he or she will be at school and developing in to a real little person!

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Nah, I can also still remember the pain as though it was yesterday. My ex is convinced this is the reason I had such a horrific time with my second child. I was so worked up about it that my body didn't want to do what comes naturally. My first was 5 hours start to finish, my second was 2.5 days and an emergency section.

 

To the OP, go with the flow. Don't plan too much beyond the sort of music you want. I know plenty who have had water births and as long as you aren't far away from medical intervention should the need arise then go for it.

 

Glad it's not just me!! I say be informed and be prepared. The mind is a powerful thing where pain is concerned but drugs can help in the later stages....some women seem to have an easier time....I guess many factors involved but induced birth notoriously painful. Neither of mine wanted to budge...I was so disappointed. I needed full on hormone drip to get it going and progressing. Nearly 2 days for my 2nd from start to finish too...

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I've never heard anyone say they've forgotten the pain of labour. I remember mine as if it was yesterday and it was almost 38 years ago! Much the same as I remember the pain of a dislocated knee 5 or 6 times. The labour was a worthwhile pain....:wubclub:

 

 

I agree 100% A very productive pain and for me easy to manage with breathing and gas and air at the start, almost spiritual...but by the end....almost out of body experience!! Overwhelming.....

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I found TENS pretty useless but some people swear by them...it's one of those things that works for some but not others. Entonox was great though.

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I know I'm only a bloke but water births have no proven benefits and are extremely dangerous and can be deadly so I think it would be reckless to consider one.


I want it all, and I want it now.

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I know I'm only a bloke but water births have no proven benefits and are extremely dangerous and can be deadly so I think it would be reckless to consider one.

 

Parley!!!! Don't be silly. Of course it's safe for most women. Midwives are not in the business of endangering babies:dull: If you are deemed high risk for various reasons it would not be offered in the first place....

Edited by HappyHeart

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Thanks. The second one actually is listing all the reasons it's safe too. Funnily all the negative views seem to be from America where they do FAR more c sections, epidurals and don't encourage women to move about.

One of those their main issue is that most of the water births they see are at home.

 

Mine is going to be in the hospital with a specially trained in water births midwife.

They have gone over the risks with me, as they have done with lots of things.

 

I have looked at the positives and the negatives and the positives, in my, and my midwifes opinion, out weigh the small possibility of the negatives.


Has two beautiful Aussie little girls :-)

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I suppose I would trust a doctor's view more than a midwife, but maybe that is sexist. I don't know.

 

Anyway you should make sure you are across all the risks and can make an informed decision. Not just think it sounds like a nice experience.


I want it all, and I want it now.

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I had a wonderful epidural with my daughter. It really was a beautiful pain free birth. It wore off just at the right time and there were no complications. I could feel every contraction but no pain. Just gas and air with the second two. The gas and air did work well apartfrom when they tried to wrestle it away from me :laugh: Didn't have a choice to have a water birth tbh but a warm bath did help in the early stages.

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I suppose I would trust a doctor's view more than a midwife, but maybe that is sexist. I don't know.

 

Anyway you should make sure you are across all the risks and can make an informed decision. Not just think it sounds like a nice experience.

I've discussed it with my ob too. I've been seeing her every four weeks because of kidney issues and she is all for a water birth too. My kidneys won't affect that at all she assures me. :-D


Has two beautiful Aussie little girls :-)

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I suppose I would trust a doctor's view more than a midwife, but maybe that is sexist. I don't know.

 

Anyway you should make sure you are across all the risks and can make an informed decision. Not just think it sounds like a nice experience.

 

Giving birth, I'd trust my midwife over a doctor any day. In the UK at least, doctors only get involved in the birth of a baby when medical intervention is required. Otherwise midwives are left to help mum deliver their babies. Doctors will generally go medical options and not much else. It's what they are trained to do.

 

Unless there was a medical emergency for a doctor to go near me in labour I point blank didn't want one near me. Why I opted for a home birth and a pool ;)

Edited by Guest

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I suppose I would trust a doctor's view more than a midwife, but maybe that is sexist. I don't know.

 

Anyway you should make sure you are across all the risks and can make an informed decision. Not just think it sounds like a nice experience.

 

Why?


I drink, therefore I dance.....

 

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I suppose I would trust a doctor's view more than a midwife, but maybe that is sexist. I don't know.

 

Anyway you should make sure you are across all the risks and can make an informed decision. Not just think it sounds like a nice experience.

 

When it comes to birthing babies...I'd go with the experienced midwife every single time...birth is a natural process that does not need specialist medical intervention in the majority of cases. We are lucky to have access to specialist care in developed countries and pre-natal screening identifies a lot of 'risks' but fact is for most women obstetrician care is not warranted. Of course Drs need to earn their coin. I was actually offered an elective caesar with my first....I asked the Dr why? What was the rationale? I had a normal pregnancy but was a week overdue. Convenience....I politely declined.

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Trust me if something goes wrong the doctor will take over in a heartbeat.


I want it all, and I want it now.

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I agree with not planning too much. One thing we did include in my birth plan, was that I didn't want to be rushed in to making any decisions, unless in an emergency situation. I wanted to avoid a caesarian at all costs, and felt that the likelihood of that happening was maybe increased with some labour interventions.

 

With eldest, my waters went three weeks before my due date. I had wanted a water birth, so we went in to the midwife led unit at the hospital (after phoning to see what to do). I wasn't having any contractions at that time, so they sent me home to wait it out. The contractions started a few hours later, and by the time we had phoned the hospital to let them know we were coming, had made the almost hour long drive to the hospital, and been examined, they were coming thick and fast. I knew I didn't want pethidine, and when I tried gas and air it made me feel nauseous and completely out of control, so because the pain was so bad I asked for an epidural, meaning an end to my wishes for a water birth. After that I was quite comfortable, although I could still feel the contractions. When I was ready to push, it took almost three hours to push her out. Hospital policy was that they usually recommend intervention after two hours, but I begged them to let me push for longer. When the midwife examined me, the baby had her head twisted to the side (she could feel her ear), which is why it took so long.

 

With youngest I was induced on my due date for medical reasons. I found the pain far easier to cope with until the end. I asked for an epidural, but they decided to give me a spinal block, as I was so far along. In the event, the anaesthetist gave me the block, and walked around to speak to me, and my waters broke all over his shoes/legs! She was actually born very quickly after that, maybe three or four good pushes, and a slight panic from OH because the midwives had disappeared! I think I preferred the spinal because I didn't have to be catheterised, which I did with the epidural.

 

In any case, enjoy the last weeks of your pregnancy and time with a newborn, because before you know it he or she will be at school and developing in to a real little person!

 

Took me 3 hours to push out my eldest too! Luckily second was much easier at less than half an hour

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Fwiw also, I saw a consultant or two over the course of my pregnancy. None of them made me feel comfortable about giving birth.

 

Most women with a normal pregnancy won't see a doctor at all during it and only in labour if there is a problem with mum or baby. Otherwise it's midwives all that way.

 

I personally loved that my midwife saw me every few weeks through my pregnancy and knew me, how I had gone and so on. And was then there to help me bring my baby into the world. Not some doctor who argued the toss with me weeks before or who I had never met before. Sure if my baby or I had needed medical intervention, fair enough, I was ready that it might have to happen but I honestly believed I was capable of giving birth naturally and was fine with it all. I wanted a chance to let things happen naturally, not turned into a medicalise birth because it didn't go to a timeframe or some such.

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A recent Cochrane review found no evidence of risk associated with water birth...as mentioned the risk is more to do with home birth and access to help in an emergency...As Snifter rightly points out America do thinks a lot differently and fear of medico legal negligence cases win the day over letting women make informed decisions. Midwifery is not as common there. I think the general consensus is that for 'low risk' birth you are arguably safer at home with a skilled midwife; with less risk of infection and unnecessary intervention. Each to their own

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Hi,

 

My wife planned on having a Water Birth. She actually used it and had it in her birth plan. She found it very relaxing but our son decided he was way too relaxed and didn't want to come out. As her waters broker at 3am the day before it was too risky to long out the process. So it was either she have an epidural which she was against or have a c-sec which she said was a NO-NO unless there was complications. Had an epidural and our son was born healthy.

 

Whatever you decide is down to an individual. Birth plans will and can change and this will be out of your hands. Just be open about it. As my wife had an epidural she used a heat mat after our son was born so that in future she wouldn't have problems with her back. So far so good. Just need to take care.

 

All the best and its the best feeling once the baby arrives. Be open and think of the final outcome


 

 

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Trust me if something goes wrong the doctor will take over in a heartbeat.

And as I said, mine is all for the water birth with the midwife. She did say 'we are just down the corridor if you need us'.


Has two beautiful Aussie little girls :-)

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Giving birth, I'd trust my midwife over a doctor any day. In the UK at least, doctors only get involved in the birth of a baby when medical intervention is required. Otherwise midwives are left to help mum deliver their babies. Doctors will generally go medical options and not much else. It's what they are trained to do.

 

 

 

I was just going to write the same. :-)


Trying to get to Aus since 2008. Finally the end is in sight and we are starting to really plan.

Hubby, Paramedic.

Me, Adult Nursing student started Sept 2018. 

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I had docs involved in my second birth due to complications. Both the docs AND the midwives saved my life that day and I'm forever grateful to them all.

It was a joint effort. (2 docs, one prob a reg, one sho, 4 or 5 midwives present all at the same time).

I don't think they 'took over', but instead were in charge as nurses can't prescribe certain meds so the doc did that, a nurse wrote it down, another got the meds, another gave it to me, one of the docs tried to find the issue.

Without nurses/midwives, docs wouldn't be able to do their job. Nurses do far far more in quantity then docs imo.

Guess it depends on your background, having worked in hosp and a+e specifically I've seen nurses pick up on mistakes docs have made (including prescribing a child 10x the amount of medicine it was allowed which would have killed the child).

I had consultant led care for baby 3 and actually disagreed with some of the things they wanted me to do/take.

I explained to midwives who supported me but all agreed if anything serious happened then they could go ahead and give any meds necessary.

I'd take midwife care over docs any day. But nice to have them as back up.

 

(I'm sorry for being cryptic, but I don't think Blossom needs to hear about my issue but wanted to make clear that midwives are amazing and I'm more then happy and safe in their care.)

Edited by Tappers2oz

Trying to get to Aus since 2008. Finally the end is in sight and we are starting to really plan.

Hubby, Paramedic.

Me, Adult Nursing student started Sept 2018. 

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