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Skin Cancer

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So much in the news about skin cancer these days.

 

When I got my flue shot this year the nurse found a mole on the back of my arm which I cannot see and said it needed checking. Shock horror. So doc sent me to a Dermatologist who I saw this week. Its all aok but she checked me all over. She said if we have ever had blisters from sunburn this can be a factor. Also said that we need to check genital area, scalp and bottoms of our feet. I never thought about it I guess I always thought it was our more exposed areas that were a problem. Also gave me a pamphlet and which gave a diagram of where to check every month or so just like breast cancer checks. So its interesting, I always thought I was up to date with skin cancer probs but obviously always more information to learn and be aware of.


Petals

:ssign15:taking no prisoners :wink:

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I'm discovering more about this, because my husband had a basal cell carcinoma on his cheek last year. It was scary how fast it grew, and he had to have a big chunk of his face cut out to remove it (luckily he had a good plastic surgeon and you'd hardly know now it's healed).

 

He is now absolutely paranoid about going out in the sun, which is why we're thinking of heading back to Oz. I thought he was being ridiculous, but I found out an interesting fact the other day.

 

Most of Australia (as far south as Canberra) has an "extreme" UV index in the summer - most of Europe doesn't get above 10, Oz is 11, 12, 13. The World Health Organisations says when the index is 8/9/10 you should seek shade and wear a hat etc. When it's over 11, you should stay indoors! No wonder the incidence of skin cancer in Australia is the highest in the world.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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I'm discovering more about this, because my husband had a basal cell carcinoma on his cheek last year. It was scary how fast it grew, and he had to have a big chunk of his face cut out to remove it (luckily he had a good plastic surgeon and you'd hardly know now it's healed).

 

He is now absolutely paranoid about going out in the sun, which is why we're thinking of heading back to Oz. I thought he was being ridiculous, but I found out an interesting fact the other day.

 

Most of Australia (as far south as Canberra) has an "extreme" UV index in the summer - most of Europe doesn't get above 10, Oz is 11, 12, 13. The World Health Organisations says when the index is 8/9/10 you should seek shade and wear a hat etc. When it's over 11, you should stay indoors! No wonder the incidence of skin cancer in Australia is the highest in the world.

 

TBH The UK is just as affected, quite often because A -people are ignorant due to the weather and B- when they jet off to europe for a sun fix they bake till they are beetroots..

Some stats for the UK show us -

 

 

Whilst the stats for Aus show us -

In 2011, 2087 people died from skin cancer in Australia. The majority of these deaths were due to melanoma, with 1544 deaths from melanoma that year, compared with 543 deaths from non-melanoma skin cancers ( http://www.cancer.org.au/about-cancer/types-of-cancer/skin-cancer.html )

 

Cal x


If you don't go after what you want, you'll never have it. If you don't ask, the answer is always no. If you don't step forward, you're always in the same place...

If you get a chance,take it, If it changes your life,let it. Nobody said it would be easy they just said it would be worth it...

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TBH The UK is just as affected...

Some stats for the UK show us -

 

  • There were 2,209 deaths from malignant melanoma skin cancer in the UK in 2011.

 

Whilst the stats for Aus show us -

In 2011, 2087 people died from skin cancer in Australia. The majority of these deaths were due to melanoma, with 1544 deaths from melanoma that year, compared with 543 deaths from non-melanoma skin cancers

 

That's about the same number of deaths in Australia as in the UK, but the UK has over three times as many people. So it is a much bigger problem in Oz - and that's only deaths.

 

Statistics show that two out of three Australians will have some kind of skin cancer in their lifetime. Melanoma (the deadly skin cancer) is the most common cancer among Australians aged 15 to 44.

 

I'm sure those numbers would be much worse but for the education programs Australia runs. I can recall seeing the first slip-slop-slap messages (or the equivalent) way back when I first arrived, thirty years ago. So whole generations of Australians have been conscientiously applying sunscreen since then!

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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TBH The UK is just as affected, quite often because A -people are ignorant due to the weather and B- when they jet off to europe for a sun fix they bake till they are beetroots..

Some stats for the UK show us -

 

 

Whilst the stats for Aus show us -

In 2011, 2087 people died from skin cancer in Australia. The majority of these deaths were due to melanoma, with 1544 deaths from melanoma that year, compared with 543 deaths from non-melanoma skin cancers ( http://www.cancer.org.au/about-cancer/types-of-cancer/skin-cancer.html )

 

Cal x

 

At the risk of being pedantic, it's not "just as affected" then, since proportionately (to population) melanoma fatalities are about 75-80% higher in Australia

 

Not that I am blind to the risk in the UK; my sister in law is a very lucky woman, she had melanoma in her early twenties with two reorrcurrences whilst living in the UK, then after 12 years clear developed a secondary brain tumour which manifested itself whilst she was living in Oz. She was very, very lucky to survive that, the Op, and the miraculous fact that she never developed any other secondaries

 

Melanoma tends to be a very very fast moving and aggressive cancer. I think people get a false sense of security because if it's on the skin, they'll spot it, but you have to catch MM very early to have a good prognosis

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At the risk of being pedantic, it's not "just as affected" then, since proportionately (to population) melanoma fatalities are about 75-80% higher in Australia

 

Not that I am blind to the risk in the UK; my sister in law is a very lucky woman, she had melanoma in her early twenties with two reorrcurrences whilst living in the UK, then after 12 years clear developed a secondary brain tumour which manifested itself whilst she was living in Oz. She was very, very lucky to survive that, the Op, and the miraculous fact that she never developed any other secondaries

 

Melanoma tends to be a very very fast moving and aggressive cancer. I think people get a false sense of security because if it's on the skin, they'll spot it, but you have to catch MM very early to have a good prognosis

 

Maybe 'your affected just as much' would have been better wording,lol, it just makes me cringe when people seem to think you will be ok in the UK but not in Aus, ive seen it written on here lots of times and its not the case,like you i too have personal experience,my mother died at a very young age to cancer, i was 12 wks old when she passed and growing up with no mum isnt always easy, no matter how old you get.

 

I agree the slip, slop slap and skin check ctrs in Aus are great and again it just makes me wonder why its not more publicised in the UK and more centers aren't out there for people to access easily to get checks done,especially when its something taking peoples lives and so many people seem oblivious to the risks because they are not living in a 'hot country'.

 

Cal x


If you don't go after what you want, you'll never have it. If you don't ask, the answer is always no. If you don't step forward, you're always in the same place...

If you get a chance,take it, If it changes your life,let it. Nobody said it would be easy they just said it would be worth it...

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they will cut anything off here! had a lump on my face which looked dodgy- NHS gave me some 'cream' and sent me away, got back here, it was cut off within a week! same thing happened when i had a lump on my leg- they just don't take chances here. But i do like how if you mention a mole to a doctor here, it's always treated seriously and looked at, but not in the uk. however, no one seems to care that aussies are dowsing their kids in chemicals all summer- you can't let the poor things burn, or really let them outside unprotected for most of the year, and you have to slather them in chemicals for which we do not really know has detrimental effects either- it's just the only option to sunburn. personally drives me nuts worrying about my child in the sun here......sure, they can enjoy the beach as long as they wear a Victorian style 'sun safe' suit, and not really go out in it in peak hours. i personally had better childhood freedoms on margate beach in a pair of knickers and a bit of factor 4 if really needed :)

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I get a mole check every yr here at the mole clinic as does all the kids. I know 3 people personally who have all had melenoma cut out and 2 were from the UK, had them cut out within the first 5 yrs of living here.

I dont use sunscreen if I can help it as I believe the chemicals also put you at risk, as does lack of vitamin D, so we cover up, try not to get too much exposure, enough to top up our Vit D and only use as chemical free as we can find sunscreen if we are out for the day in the sun, such as at theme parks or the beach.

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At the risk of being pedantic, it's not "just as affected" then, since proportionately (to population) melanoma fatalities are about 75-80% higher in Australia

 

Not that I am blind to the risk in the UK; my sister in law is a very lucky woman, she had melanoma in her early twenties with two reorrcurrences whilst living in the UK, then after 12 years clear developed a secondary brain tumour which manifested itself whilst she was living in Oz. She was very, very lucky to survive that, the Op, and the miraculous fact that she never developed any other secondaries

 

Melanoma tends to be a very very fast moving and aggressive cancer. I think people get a false sense of security because if it's on the skin, they'll spot it, but you have to catch MM very early to have a good prognosis

 

I am crap with google but I am sure I have read that whilst Australia have more cases of skin cancer than the UK more people actually die from it in the UK.

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Definitely more people respect the danger of skin cancer in Oz. The UK is making attempts in this area at awareness and all weather forecasts refer to UV on sunny days from March to September but I suspect that most people are oblivious unless they know of someone who has suffered from skin cancer.

 

Even now it is more associated here with those who sunbathe when at the Med or use tanning beds throughout the year.


Timeline: 309/100 Sent 7/8/13, Money Taken 9/8/13, CO appointed 3/9/13. Med 3/12/13. Police check 4/12/13. VISA GRANTED 8/4/14, Subclass100. Recce August 2014. Arrived 30 July 2015.

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You just need to take precautions with the sun in Australia as you would in any hot country. It's important to wear a hat here as the sun can burn you just by walking around which is not something Uk people thing about.

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however, no one seems to care that aussies are dowsing their kids in chemicals all summer- you can't let the poor things burn, or really let them outside unprotected for most of the year, and you have to slather them in chemicals for which we do not really know has detrimental effects either

 

I agree - the safety message has been taken too far. In fact, some kids are actually getting Vitamin D deficiency because their parents have gone so overboard protecting them from the sun! There's a balance to be struck, but it is difficult to keep a balanced view when you're being bombarded with ads about skin cancer.

 

I always feel sorry for the babies. In the summer, every stroller I see is shrouded in a thick blanket. The poor kid must be baking to death under there!


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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My OH had a malignant melanoma removed from his leg a couple of years ago. Luckily it was at stage 0 but thank goodness he spotted it early (it was the year of the random October heatwave and he had his shorts on and so noticed it). He's never been a sun worshipper but usually the damage is done in childhood and he remembers burning his legs as a kid.

For the reason I will have to be very careful with my children as they'll be more at risk because their Dad has had it and they are very fair skinned, like us.

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I agree - the safety message has been taken too far. In fact, some kids are actually getting Vitamin D deficiency because their parents have gone so overboard protecting them from the sun! There's a balance to be struck, but it is difficult to keep a balanced view when you're being bombarded with ads about skin cancer.

 

I always feel sorry for the babies. In the summer, every stroller I see is shrouded in a thick blanket. The poor kid must be baking to death under there!

 

Better to be safe with children. And besides we are advised here to give a multivitamin with Vit D to our children

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Its not just 'any hot country' though is it? Risk factors for skin cancer include pale skin, sudden intense exposure (all those package holidays to Spain?) mid -day exposure etc etc. So people in UK are often at risk because they jet off and then lie in it. Less these days though I think.

 

I had a BCC cut off my nose two years ago (UK resident) which was so tiny I thought I was wasting their time ... I only went because I had seen all the adverts about checking out suspicious lumps and bumps during a holiday in oz. I couldnt believe it when the doc told me that they only just avoided a skin graft! Thats 36 years of playground dury for you. I am now fanatical about sun screen and will add soles of feet etc to my check list. Thanks for the info petals, I had no idea.


103 visa application lodged February 2013. 143 visa application submitted January 2016. Police checks and form 80 submitted February 29th 2016. Visa granted April 4th 2016.

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Its not just 'any hot country' though is it? Risk factors for skin cancer include pale skin, sudden intense exposure (all those package holidays to Spain?) mid -day exposure etc etc. So people in UK are often at risk because they jet off and then lie in it. Less these days though I think.

 

I had a BCC cut off my nose two years ago (UK resident) which was so tiny I thought I was wasting their time ... I only went because I had seen all the adverts about checking out suspicious lumps and bumps during a holiday in oz. I couldnt believe it when the doc told me that they only just avoided a skin graft! Thats 36 years of playground dury for you. I am now fanatical about sun screen and will add soles of feet etc to my check list. Thanks for the info petals, I had no idea.

 

"When I got my flu shot"..God that sounds so American...Good on you petals for getting your flu shot like a good little citizen...or sheep..

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"When I got my flu shot"..God that sounds so American...Good on you petals for getting your flu shot like a good little citizen...or sheep..

 

A person who has never had real flu could only write this. Hope you never have the experience.


Petals

:ssign15:taking no prisoners :wink:

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Australians are pretty clued up about skin cancer. If you get it here it cause you've been unfortunate rather than a reckless cause people don't take risks with the sun anymore. Walking about with the sun in your face can give you sunburn if you're not careful.

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I'm discovering more about this, because my husband had a basal cell carcinoma on his cheek last year. It was scary how fast it grew, and he had to have a big chunk of his face cut out to remove it (luckily he had a good plastic surgeon and you'd hardly know now it's healed).

 

He is now absolutely paranoid about going out in the sun, which is why we're thinking of heading back to Oz. I thought he was being ridiculous, but I found out an interesting fact the other day.

 

Most of Australia (as far south as Canberra) has an "extreme" UV index in the summer - most of Europe doesn't get above 10, Oz is 11, 12, 13. The World Health Organisations says when the index is 8/9/10 you should seek shade and wear a hat etc. When it's over 11, you should stay indoors! No wonder the incidence of skin cancer in Australia is the highest in the world.

 

My mother developed a Basel cell carcinoma after just visiting us in oz! We only just found out I was really shocked it was just this tiny sore. I had no idea that could be a sign of cancer . I hope your husbands treatment went well. Still waiting to hear what they are going to do for my mum.

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My UK gp said mine was just veins close to the surface. I demanded a second opinion. The dermatologist said you can't tell by looking, you need to biopsy to be sure. It was a bcc.

they will cut anything off here! had a lump on my face which looked dodgy- NHS gave me some 'cream' and sent me away, got back here, it was cut off within a week! same thing happened when i had a lump on my leg- they just don't take chances here. But i do like how if you mention a mole to a doctor here, it's always treated seriously and looked at, but not in the uk. however, no one seems to care that aussies are dowsing their kids in chemicals all summer- you can't let the poor things burn, or really let them outside unprotected for most of the year, and you have to slather them in chemicals for which we do not really know has detrimental effects either- it's just the only option to sunburn. personally drives me nuts worrying about my child in the sun here......sure, they can enjoy the beach as long as they wear a Victorian style 'sun safe' suit, and not really go out in it in peak hours. i personally had better childhood freedoms on margate beach in a pair of knickers and a bit of factor 4 if really needed :)

Nearly there! Don't drop the ball now guys! Vaccines are weeks away. Stay safe!

 

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Its not just in Aus, high incidence of melanoma in UK now as people take their holidays in the tropics and want to get a tan in a short time span. This is when the damage is done. I have never laid on the beach all day or been a fan of getting a tan. I just get a tan from moving around normally and doing normal stuff. However or planet is changing and the ozone level is depleting so we need to be a lot more careful than in times gone by. Any sun exposure can give us cancer wherever we live. Personally I do not use a lot of sun screen but I try to remember to wear a hat and I do cover up with a long sleeved shirt in summer at times.

 

For the children the suits are wonderful as no-one wants a child with sunburn. Schools here in Aus make the children wear hats now, they did not do that until last couple of decades and shade sails are over the playground equipment.

 

Skin cancer goes with getting a tan, so just depends what people are prepared to forego, a tan or take the risk just like all other substances that have cancer causing agents.


Petals

:ssign15:taking no prisoners :wink:

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Its funny that in the UK having a tan is desirable cause it gives off the impression that you've had exotic holidays so it's a sign of wealth. In Asia and also to some extent Australia having a tan has the opposite effect. It gives off the impression that you're a manual labourer so you spend a lot of time outdoors. In Melbourne you see this a lot with Asians when they carry umbrellas when it's not raining just to shield them from the sun. To them having white skin is a sign of wealth as they have a better class of job which keeps them indoors.

Edited by jasepom

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TBH The UK is just as affected, quite often because A -people are ignorant due to the weather and B- when they jet off to europe for a sun fix they bake till they are beetroots..

Some stats for the UK show us -

 

 

Whilst the stats for Aus show us -

In 2011, 2087 people died from skin cancer in Australia. The majority of these deaths were due to melanoma, with 1544 deaths from melanoma that year, compared with 543 deaths from non-melanoma skin cancers ( http://www.cancer.org.au/about-cancer/types-of-cancer/skin-cancer.html )

 

Cal x

 

The Oz figure is more scary due to the population being so small here compared to the UK. I now dont want to go to the beach etc myself

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Not only do you get skin cancers but the sun ages the skin and makes it look leathery as you age. Always wear a hat.I have had 3 basal cell carcinomas cut off my face, the one on my forehead needed 11 stitches, it has left a dent, i call it my lobotomy. So do be careful with your children and yourselves.

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I went to the docs to ask if he could treat my verruca. He ignored my verruca and asked how long had I had the mole on the sole of my foot. I said I didn't even know I had a mole there. Doc then made me an appointment straight away to have it looked at by the hospital. He said all moles on the bottom of your feet should be regarded as suspicious. :elvis:

 

Anyway, mine was measured and photographed and I had to go back after a few weeks to have it re-measured to see if it was getting any bigger. That was about 8 yrs ago, I still have the mole but I keep an eye on it just in case it turns nasty.

 

Before this, I had no idea that you could get skin cancer on the sole of your feet.


Flights booked for Sydney 29/09/2015 :cool:

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