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carrotcruncher

We moved back 4 years ago

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Sydney is great but not comparable to London - not the same thing (apples vs. pears). I thought you might have noticed that when you lived in London. No?

 

We all know you are a big fan of Australia but lets not bend the truth to suit the argument.

 

 

How can you be bored in Sydney ? It's got amazing nightlife attractions and shows. It's like London with sunshine and beaches. Manly is awesome too. You can escape to the Blue Mountains if you need to get away. What are you after ?

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Even the likes of me who live in the arse end of Australia have heard of Coober Pedy!!!

 

I am hugely ignorant about Australia, despite my many years here. The other day my partner mentioned a possible trip to Sydney. My first question was "is there much there?"

 

She looked aghast, but I've never been there so how would I know?

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I am hugely ignorant about Australia, despite my many years here. The other day my partner mentioned a possible trip to Sydney. My first question was "is there much there?"

 

She looked aghast, but I've never been there so how would I know?

 

Oh deary me.

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Got my wallet stolen twice in London whilst I lived there. Assaulted in Liverpool

and hassled in Crewe....

 

....put upon in Portsmouth, stood up in Stevenage, made to wait in Woking, stuck in traffic in Truro, and looked at in a funny way in Wakefield....

 

I got abused walking along a street in Yorkshire, back in 2010, when a truckie took offence to the rather normal hat I was wearing at the time. His accent somehow nullified the intended abuse and had to laugh.

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I am hugely ignorant about Australia, despite my many years here. The other day my partner mentioned a possible trip to Sydney. My first question was "is there much there?"

 

She looked aghast, but I've never been there so how would I know?

 

A question some may consider perfectly normal under the circumstances.

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Sydney is great but not comparable to London - not the same thing (apples vs. pears). I thought you might have noticed that when you lived in London. No?

 

We all know you are a big fan of Australia but lets not bend the truth to suit the argument.

 

I agree but afraid we will.

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She looked aghast, but I've never been there so how would I know?

 

You mean this forum doesn't tell you EVERYTHING there is not know about Australia??

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Oh deary me.

 

Thats pretty much what she said!

 

As a Brit who's only in Australia because of an Australian partner and child, it's very easy to adopt the attitude of "You head off and enjoy your country and I'll hold your coat." I've made the mistake of presuming that just being here (in my OH's country) would be enough. But for it to work, you've probably got to develop some degree of interest in the place I imagine, or at least learn to fake an interest.

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And the pubs that remain you wouldn't want to go in anyway. They are either rough as hell or awful Brewster type places. Aussie pubs have the upper hand now I think at least you can have a drink without fear of being started at.

 

But you can still find country pubs in Uk that are worth visiting. Reminds me of the film "An American Werewolf in London. Stick to the path.

 

And you haven't been to rough boozers in OZ?

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The boozers here seem to be less so. Even if the clientele is rough the pub at least has nice toilets.

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Half of the locals I went to in Harrogate were absolutely rough as hell. But we did live in the are end of Harrogate called Starbeck. Attempted murder outside our local, garbage everywhere. Gloomy terraced housing. Neighbours looking over your back wall. Did I want to live there ? No.

 

please don't exaggerate to suit your agenda..Harrogate is hardly murder Central!! And pubs as rough as hell?? I must be living near another Harrogate..


Aymie :wub:

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Thats pretty much what she said!

 

As a Brit who's only in Australia because of an Australian partner and child, it's very easy to adopt the attitude of "You head off and enjoy your country and I'll hold your coat." I've made the mistake of presuming that just being here (in my OH's country) would be enough. But for it to work, you've probably got to develop some degree of interest in the place I imagine, or at least learn to fake an interest.

 

That's a rather sad statement. If I suddenly fell in love with a Greek or a Spaniard and moved to his country, I wouldn't go with an attitude of putting up with it - because that would guarantee I'd never fully settle. I'd at least make an attempt to get to know the country.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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That's a rather sad statement. If I suddenly fell in love with a Greek or a Spaniard and moved to his country, I wouldn't go with an attitude of putting up with it - because that would guarantee I'd never fully settle. I'd at least make an attempt to get to know the country.

 

 

With hindsight, you're absolutely right. Initially when we came over I thought it would only be for a year or two, so I regarded the whole thing as kind of like a relationship obligation. Five and a half years later we're still here, but embracing the place has not been something I've been able to do. I really wish that I could, but by now it would just feel wrong, would feel fake somehow.

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With hindsight, you're absolutely right. Initially when we came over I thought it would only be for a year or two, so I regarded the whole thing as kind of like a relationship obligation. Five and a half years later we're still here, but embracing the place has not been something I've been able to do. I really wish that I could, but by now it would just feel wrong, would feel fake somehow.

 

No need to feel fake mate. There is plenty to like about living here, in your heart of hearts you know that.

You don't have to suddenly to barrack for the pies or anything like that. You just have to like what you like and accept that what you don't like won't change.

 

You must have met loads of people along the way who, like you and me, don't buy into the BS that we're living in some kind of uniquely meritocratic utopia, or that everyone is equal here (because of the legendary fair go and mateship).

 

Likewise, plenty of people who think that locking up children in the name of 'stopping the boats' is morally repugnant.

 

And last but not least, quite a few who think that baristas are pretentious ******s who pour coffee for a living.


My Brain Hurts!

 

 

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With hindsight, you're absolutely right. Initially when we came over I thought it would only be for a year or two, so I regarded the whole thing as kind of like a relationship obligation. Five and a half years later we're still here, but embracing the place has not been something I've been able to do. I really wish that I could, but by now it would just feel wrong, would feel fake somehow.

 

How can you decide whether to embrace it or not, if you know nothing about it? You don't have to make that decision - just make a decision to get involved with it, and to learn about it, then see what you think.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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How can you decide whether to embrace it or not, if you know nothing about it? You don't have to make that decision - just make a decision to get involved with it, and to learn about it, then see what you think.

 

I came over on holidays a couple of times. Liked the places I visited - GC, Brisbane, Sunshine Coast etc but didn't experience any kind of 'wow' factor. I think that's pretty telling, i.e., that there wasn't even going to be honeymoon period here for me. Whilst a holiday won't give you anything like the whole picture of a place, if it's a really great holiday then you'll often be keen to return. After the second holiday here I was completely over the place. No disrespect to it, it just doesn't float my boat, and never will.

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No disrespect to it, it just doesn't float my boat, and never will.

 

I can identify with that - had a great 3 weeks holiday on the East Coast and then a couple of years later moved to WA to live. It took about 6 months to lose the 'rose tinted spectacles view' and change from 'this is just like I thought it would be after the holiday' mode to 'actually living here is a great deal different from what I expected' - don't get me wrong, I had a great time and a fabulous experience for a couple of years, but now I'm back in the UK, I certainly appreciate it a lot more.

 

I can't see me ever visiting Oz again - if I have enough money for a return to Oz, there are other places I'd rather visit.

Edited by TerryDXB

Secure in their internet anonymity, the bored middle aged old women (of both sexes) fought their mighty keyboard battles on a daily basis, in a never ending struggle to prove the superiority of their own worthless points of view over those of similarly challenged keyboard warriors....in the meantime, the world kept turning

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No disrespect to it, it just doesn't float my boat, and never will.

 

I can identify with that - had a great 3 weeks holiday on the East Coast and then a couple of years later moved to WA to live. It took about 6 months to lose the 'rose tinted spectacles view' and change from 'this is just like I thought it would be after the holiday' mode to 'actually living here is much different from what I expected' - don't get me wrong, I had a great time and a fabulous experience for a couple of years, but now I'm back in the UK, I certainly appreciate it a lot more.

This is one of the great things about returning to the UK for many people, you do look at it in a different light, you do appreciate the seasons and the beauty of the place that you just took fro granted and the biggest factor for me was being back amongst my own kind, I do like meeting people from other countries but when you want a chat and a pint in a nice pub I dont think you can beat a fellow Brit.


Drinking rum before 11am does not make you an alcoholic, it makes you pirate..

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No disrespect to it, it just doesn't float my boat, and never will.

 

I can identify with that - had a great 3 weeks holiday on the East Coast and then a couple of years later moved to WA to live. It took about 6 months to lose the 'rose tinted spectacles view' and change from 'this is just like I thought it would be after the holiday' mode to 'actually living here is a great deal different from what I expected' - don't get me wrong, I had a great time and a fabulous experience for a couple of years, but now I'm back in the UK, I certainly appreciate it a lot more.

 

I can't see me ever visiting Oz again - if I have enough money for a return to Oz, there are other places I'd rather visit.

 

At least you tried it and you won't have the what if's ? Life is too short to stay somewhere that doesn't do it for you.

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I came over on holidays a couple of times. Liked the places I visited - GC, Brisbane, Sunshine Coast etc but didn't experience any kind of 'wow' factor. I think that's pretty telling, i.e., that there wasn't even going to be honeymoon period here for me. Whilst a holiday won't give you anything like the whole picture of a place, if it's a really great holiday then you'll often be keen to return. After the second holiday here I was completely over the place. No disrespect to it, it just doesn't float my boat, and never will.

 

Surely you're missing the middle ground? No one's asking you to fall in love with the place. There are two ways to make friends - sometimes you hit it off straight away, and sometimes the friendship grows gradually. Right now, you're turning your back, folding your arms and refusing to play, so there's no chance of a friendship ever developing. You will never feel at home in Oz, but you might, if you give it a chance, feel comfortable with it.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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No disrespect to it, it just doesn't float my boat, and never will.

 

I can identify with that - had a great 3 weeks holiday on the East Coast and then a couple of years later moved to WA to live. It took about 6 months to lose the 'rose tinted spectacles view' and change from 'this is just like I thought it would be after the holiday' mode to 'actually living here is a great deal different from what I expected'

 

As someone from the East Coast, my observation is that life in the West is very different. My niece stayed with me for a year, loved it and was keen to move here. She got the offer of a job in Perth, came to have a look, hated it and turned down the job. She has subsequently done a contract in Perth which only reinforced her view.

 

I'm not saying Perth is a bad place to live - I know several people who moved from Sydney and loved it. But it does seem to be a city that people either love or hate! It's one mistake immigrants often make - assuming that because we all sound pretty much the same, that all Australians are the same and the only difference between the states is the climate.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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That's right there are so many differences between the cities. Melbourne is so different to Perth I'm not saying it's better just different. Pace of life varies between states I wouldn't feel at home in Sydney or Adelaide but find Melbourne is just right for me.

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