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Lostlily

I would love to move back to the UK, but it is so hard.

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a slice of what cake? are you saying that if i live and work in australia for 6 months then live in the uk for 6 months I would get taxed twice on the Australian money I earned, I really hope that isn't the case, seems un fair to get taxed twice

 

I've just been doing some research and yes, LostLily is right. If you have a permanent home in two countries and you move between them like clockwork, then yes you are considered "resident" in both countries - because, let's face it, you are - and you will be liable to tax in both countries. It doesn't mean you'll pay more tax, because you'll be taxed at resident rates and there's a double taxation agreement. It just means two tax returns.

 

In LostLily's case it would actually be a lot better than if she moved to the UK permanently (because then she'd be charged Aussie tax at harsh, non-resident rates).

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Why can't you go back for 1 month a year ? What's stopping you ?

 

because i only see my husband all up, 4 months a year. I want to stay longer as I'm lonely.

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Please don't rush into going back to Uk. If it makes the people around you miserable that will affect you also. Get treatment for you anxiety here you have a lovely family around you there's no need to go anywhere. Family comes first.

 

 

OMG Jasepom how can you say this?? You left your wife and children in the UK for a lifestyle in Aus but now you are telling Lostlily that she should stay in Aus because "family is everything"?! What about your family?

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OMG Jasepom how can you say this?? You left your wife and children in the UK for a lifestyle in Aus but now you are telling Lostlily that she should stay in Aus because "family is everything"?! What about your family?

 

As I see it she is thinking of her family, that's why she is so torn.

 

You should shack up with my husband, you'd do very well together!

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That shacking up comment wasn't directed at me was it Tillyd?

 

Ignore me, I see now that it wasn't! :-)

Edited by Aunt Agatha

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OMG Jasepom how can you say this?? You left your wife and children in the UK for a lifestyle in Aus

 

I don't know your situation at all but I'd rather live in a 3rd world country with my wife and kids than be without them.

 

thats just me though.

 

Dan

Edited by wattsy1982

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I don't know your situation at all but I'd rather live in a 3rd world country with my wife and kids than be without them.

 

thats just me though.

 

Dan

 

A lot to be said for developing world countries. Hardly third world at lest in the ability to live life due to factors like a quarter of the price in countries like Australia. No wonder more are taking the plunge and moving to Thailand, Malaysia etc. Especially for retirement or pre retirement.

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I have been thinking and I must apologise if my comments came across as a personal attack Jasepom, that wasn't my intention. I was genuinely shocked by your advice to the OP and, given your own choices, felt they were disingenuous. My maternal instincts probably got the better of me but I shouldn't have mentioned your family.

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As I see it she is thinking of her family, that's why she is so torn.

 

You should shack up with my husband, you'd do very well together!

LOL !!!!

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I have been thinking and I must apologise if my comments came across as a personal attack Jasepom, that wasn't my intention. I was genuinely shocked by your advice to the OP and, given your own choices, felt they were disingenuous. My maternal instincts probably got the better of me but I shouldn't have mentioned your family.

 

I don't usually say this, but I don't see why you're apologising. He's spouting 'family is everything' yet dumped his because he loves Oz more. 'Double standards/hypocritical/take your own advise' all spring to mind.

 

Op, I think you should research other areas of Oz to see if anything takes your fancy. It's surprising how you feel you don't like something but it turns out it was the little thing you didn't like.

Me personal example, I used to hate driving. For 8 years I would build myself up just getting in the car.

Moved to Cornwall and, although I wouldn't say I like it, I don't mind driving round down here. So instead of me disliking driving, I disliked driving round Surrey. Big problem not such a big problem after all.


Trying to get to Aus since 2008. Finally the end is in sight and we are starting to really plan.

Hubby, Paramedic.

Me, Adult Nursing student starting Sept 2018. 

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I've just been doing some research and yes, LostLily is right. If you have a permanent home in two countries and you move between them like clockwork, then yes you are considered "resident" in both countries - because, let's face it, you are - and you will be liable to tax in both countries. It doesn't mean you'll pay more tax, because you'll be taxed at resident rates and there's a double taxation agreement. It just means two tax returns.

 

In LostLily's case it would actually be a lot better than if she moved to the UK permanently (because then she'd be charged Aussie tax at harsh, non-resident rates).

 

 

You have nailed exactly what I have been trying to explain!

At the moment, we can live on what we are earning and still afford a holiday back to the UK every year, although sometimes it is a bit of a struggle.

BUT as we discovered last year, the 6 months here and 6 months there would alert both the ATO and Inland Revenue and we would be in a far worse situation financially (well this is what we have been advised) then because of that, we wouldn't have enough to live on, neither my own health or my husbands is good enough to go get a job. But we still have a small (not very profitable business here) which if we could sell it might make things easier.

We spent months in the UK last year trying to figure out a solution, but unfortunately money does come into the decision and we basically had to abort our plans. But hey ho my chin is up a bit more today. I am going back over in a few weeks and really looking forward to it.

I guess people just don't really think ahead, on the other hand "all we have is today"

Yesterday is history

Tomorrow is a mystery

Today is a gift

That's why its called "The Present"

 

I feel for others in our situation and I am normally pretty good at figuring out solutions, rather than just moaning, but I have tried, believe me I have tried.

 

I see their are a lot of kind compassionate people on this forum and I thank you and maybe have given some others "food for thought" or an insight into the complications of returning home for half a year.

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I don't usually say this, but I don't see why you're apologising. He's spouting 'family is everything' yet dumped his because he loves Oz more. 'Double standards/hypocritical/take your own advise' all spring to mind.

 

Op, I think you should research other areas of Oz to see if anything takes your fancy. It's surprising how you feel you don't like something but it turns out it was the little thing you didn't like.

Me personal example, I used to hate driving. For 8 years I would build myself up just getting in the car.

Moved to Cornwall and, although I wouldn't say I like it, I don't mind driving round down here. So instead of me disliking driving, I disliked driving round Surrey. Big problem not such a big problem after all.

 

How strange, we were going to move to Cornwall, but instead came here. I still adore Cornwall.

I didn't drive at all for two years before we came here but now I can manage about 5 mins as there is less traffic. Yeah Surrey is very busy and I couldn't possibly drive their either.

Your idea of moving to another area would be too traumatic for us at the moment. We are near our daughter and grandchildren and I wouldn't like to be far from her as well.

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Well, my husband would be extremely unhappy and refused to go back. I tried to reach a compromise of going back for a few months a year, maybe buying a small flat. It's fallen on deaf ears so now I am going back alone. We only have the one property here.

 

i totally understand about the kids, I haven't seem both my kids in the same place for 5 years.

 

i hate the though of my marriage ending but at some point if a compromise cannot be reached what else is there to do? I can only think of one outcome and that is someone will remain unhappy forever unless they just accept their lot.

 

Oh My Goodness, you poor thing, how absolutely awful for you. This is another example of heartbreak isn't it :(

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You have nailed exactly what I have been trying to explain!

At the moment, we can live on what we are earning and still afford a holiday back to the UK every year, although sometimes it is a bit of a struggle.

BUT as we discovered last year, the 6 months here and 6 months there would alert both the ATO and Inland Revenue and we would be in a far worse situation financially (well this is what we have been advised) then because of that, we wouldn't have enough to live on, neither my own health or my husbands is good enough to go get a job. But we still have a small (not very profitable business here) which if we could sell it might make things easier.

We spent months in the UK last year trying to figure out a solution, but unfortunately money does come into the decision and we basically had to abort our plans. But hey ho my chin is up a bit more today. I am going back over in a few weeks and really looking forward to it.

I guess people just don't really think ahead, on the other hand "all we have is today"

Yesterday is history

Tomorrow is a mystery

Today is a gift

That's why its called "The Present"

 

I feel for others in our situation and I am normally pretty good at figuring out solutions, rather than just moaning, but I have tried, believe me I have tried.

 

I see their are a lot of kind compassionate people on this forum and I thank you and maybe have given some others "food for thought" or an insight into the complications of returning home for half a year.

 

The idea of 6 months in each seems ideal on the face of it offering the best of both worlds but I feel that you have to be seriously well off to contemplate it as a viable option in retirement and neither you or I are in that category it seems. I also wonder how desirable it might really be in reality. You might never quite have the opportunity of fitting in at either place.

 

I wonder if there is anyone on this forum who actually does it.


Timeline: 309/100 Sent 7/8/13, Money Taken 9/8/13, CO appointed 3/9/13. Med 3/12/13. Police check 4/12/13. VISA GRANTED 8/4/14, Subclass100. Recce August 2014. Arrived 30 July 2015.

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I can see why the ATO and Inland Revenue might object to that arrangement. You could potentially pay very little tax. I've not heard of anyone doing it just the celebs like Ben Elton who follows the Sun.

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The idea of 6 months in each seems ideal on the face of it offering the best of both worlds but I feel that you have to be seriously well off to contemplate it as a viable option in retirement and neither you or I are in that category it seems. I also wonder how desirable it might really be in reality. You might never quite have the opportunity of fitting in at either place.

 

I wonder if there is anyone on this forum who actually does it.

 

I haven't done it between Oz and UK, but did live between Brunei and UK for 9 years when we lived there, mainly because our youngest was only 13 when we moved, and went to boarding school, so we kept our UK home and I flitted between the 2.

Our original thought when we retired was to spend 6 months in UK and Oz.

however, when it came to decision time, I realized I needed to make somewhere home, rather than continue with never quite belonging somewhere. It wasn't that I wasn't made welcome in both countries, for me it was unsettling and a feeling of never quite belonging, and just as I was settling back, moving away again.

so we moved here, we do go back most years for 2/3 months, but only have 1 home if that makes sense.

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A lot to be said for developing world countries. Hardly third world at lest in the ability to live life due to factors like a quarter of the price in countries like Australia. No wonder more are taking the plunge and moving to Thailand, Malaysia etc. Especially for retirement or pre retirement.

 

I can't comment about your facts about how many are moving to Thailand and Malaysia. However having lived in Brunei, prior to retiring we do have quite a few friends who retired to Kota Kinabalu, Bangkok and Phuket to name a few places. Yes it's cheap but

none of them have stayed, the main reason being that although used to working overseas, your needs are different in retirement.

there was a lack friends in their age group, in fact quite lonely, and concerns about medical plus other facilities as they got older, let alone lack of family.

All these things have to be taken into consideration before you retire.

Things to consider if moving to another country to retire:

Climate. Politically stable, Do you want to learn a new language!!!!

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Our original thought when we retired was to spend 6 months in UK and Oz.

however, when it came to decision time, I realized I needed to make somewhere home, rather than continue with never quite belonging somewhere. It wasn't that I wasn't made welcome in both countries, for me it was unsettling and a feeling of never quite belonging, and just as I was settling back, moving away again.

so we moved here, we do go back most years for 2/3 months, but only have 1 home if that makes sense.

 

My thoughts exactly and as you get older the need for a firm base becomes even more important.


Timeline: 309/100 Sent 7/8/13, Money Taken 9/8/13, CO appointed 3/9/13. Med 3/12/13. Police check 4/12/13. VISA GRANTED 8/4/14, Subclass100. Recce August 2014. Arrived 30 July 2015.

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I can see why the ATO and Inland Revenue might object to that arrangement. You could potentially pay very little tax.

 

Actually the funny thing is, you pay more tax, not less. I think most people imagine that if you're a "non-resident" of a country, then you don't have to pay tax. But the fact is if you're a non-resident, and you've got investments in that country, you're taxed at a much higher rate than residents are.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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I haven't done it between Oz and UK, but did live between Brunei and UK for 9 years when we lived there...

Our original thought when we retired was to spend 6 months in UK and Oz.

however, when it came to decision time, I realized I needed to make somewhere home, rather than continue with never quite belonging somewhere. It wasn't that I wasn't made welcome in both countries, for me it was unsettling and a feeling of never quite belonging, and just as I was settling back, moving away again.

 

 

That would concern me, too. We're looking at returning to the UK but the fact is, what my OH would really like is to be a grey nomad, travelling around Europe and the UK. I think at my age, I need somewhere to call home.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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So if you live hypothetically for 6 months in both, are you considered a resident of both, a resident of neither, or do you have to choose which one you want to be considered a resident of.


I want it all, and I want it now.

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So if you live hypothetically for 6 months in both, are you considered a resident of both, a resident of neither, or do you have to choose which one you want to be considered a resident of.
]

 

You don't get to choose, the country decides for you according to their rules. In the UK, if you live there for more than 182 days every year, you're considered resident and have to pay British tax.

 

In Australia it's less clear-cut, but if you have a home and spend some time there every year, it's likely you'll be considered resident.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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You don't get to choose, the country decides for you according to their rules. In the UK, if you live there for more than 182 days every year, you're considered resident and have to pay British tax.

 

In Australia it's less clear-cut, but if you have a home and spend some time there every year, it's likely you'll be considered resident.

Hi Marisa,

You have like us, obviously tried to retire back to the UK and found it is not as easy as may first appear. I would love to hear your experience of this?

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I can't comment about your facts about how many are moving to Thailand and Malaysia. However having lived in Brunei, prior to retiring we do have quite a few friends who retired to Kota Kinabalu, Bangkok and Phuket to name a few places. Yes it's cheap but

none of them have stayed, the main reason being that although used to working overseas, your needs are different in retirement.

there was a lack friends in their age group, in fact quite lonely, and concerns about medical plus other facilities as they got older, let alone lack of family.

All these things have to be taken into consideration before you retire.

Things to consider if moving to another country to retire:

Climate. Politically stable, Do you want to learn a new language!!!!

 

One of the attractive things about moving to South East Asia is that it is not really necessary to learn with any degree of fluency the local language. Always preferable of course but most I know that have moved there do not speak the language.

 

Yes there is and ebb and flow of folk returning but plenty more take their place. There are quite strong resident ex pat and retirement communities in places like Penang, where they participate, or at least those that wish in quite an active social life. I know Penang rather well and the social interaction would entice me there more than the actual island itself, which in my view has declined over the years. Good and cheap medical services on hand though.

 

Odd of the retirees you knew there none remained. I'd say more than 60% remain, though some in different locations from initial settlement as well. I don't know all personally though most only through a related internet forum.( But have spent a lot of time in Asia, especially Malaysia.) Some use it as a winter escape and only spend x number of months there a year.

 

Obviously the nature of the place the reality is that single men out number couples by many times, but all the same some pleasant gated communities can be found as well as well placed condo's. Life can be very good for those of such a disposition that will enable them to live in a different culture and in a tropical climate.

Quite an adventure for those that decide on that route for retirement.

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]

 

You don't get to choose, the country decides for you according to their rules. In the UK, if you live there for more than 182 days every year, you're considered resident and have to pay British tax.

 

In Australia it's less clear-cut, but if you have a home and spend some time there every year, it's likely you'll be considered resident.

 

I knew with UK it was judged in days. Good of you to point out the exact number.

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