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scott pett

do the locals and British expats bond well?

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I am deeply embarrassed but have to admit-my granddaughter barracks for the pies. Always a black sheep in every family....

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I've never found that anyone cares that i'm a pom. We are hardly a rare breed over here.

 

Don't bang on about how everything is better back home and i'm sure you will get on with them.

 

I don't think folk care much that your a Pom. I just think folk don't care an awful lot about anything outside of their personal interest and family.

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We are thinking tje outskirts of Melbourne but not sure what area yet... any recommendations? Also I hope they are just as fond of the Scottish accent lol

 

everything was looking good for you guys until you mentioned the Scottish accent!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

just kidding.

 

 

 

rules on how to fit it as a Pom.

Don't winge about the price of fruit and the fact that we have no marks and spencers

Its Australia. Its supposed to be Hot. just suck it up and get on with it and stop winging.

become a Collingwood supporter, and your fellow aussie mates will love you because they can bag the crap out of you at every opportunity (im a Collingwood fan BTW)

 

pretty easy really.

 

 

other than that, just be yourself, and it will be pretty easy to make friends. Having kids make it easier as well (schools/playgroup/sleepovers etc)


 

 

:wink:

 

 

 

 

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I never experienced any problems at all. I found if anything it was a talking point, lots of Aussies have British ancestry and are keen to talk about it :)

 

We quite purposefully avoided suburbs with a high a percentage of British migrants and the majority of our friends were Aussie's with South Africans, Danish, Italian & Swedish.

 

We lived in a suburb with a lot of Italians & Croatians and I did find that a lot of the older generation didn't speak English and family came before friends so they tended to keep to their own communities. Massive generalisation for which I apologise but whilst fitting in with Aussies is fine (though they are very different and it's you that has to adapt!) moving to an area with a large number of migrants from another country - especially a non-English speaking country may be harder.

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So you really believe all that Collingwood stuff, I am sorry but you really are not getting the Aussie humour at all. Hating Collingwood is just a laugh, how do I know because I am not really a supporter but if I have to have a club its Collingwood. I even got a job because I supported Collingwood, now that is a laugh, but that is the humour of it all. We all hear about the humour of the Brits and I understand it as I am one and married one, my parents both Brits etc etc but I also understand the Aussie humour because I have been here for such a long long time. Dry dry dry and more dry. People think they are being insulting and believe things that are just not true.

 

Yep people take their footy seriously but not that seriously and its a bit of fun taking a footy team, you don't even have to go to have a team.

 

I think that Brits are very sarcastic in humour these days and its not that nice, The Office never did it for me. However the Aussies take dry to a whole new platform and people just take them the wrong way.

 

On every other point except for Collingwood I agree with you, accept the difference.

 

[facepalm] Yes, of course I get the humour about Collingwood. That's why I said it. It's just that you don't get that I get it.... Still toothless ferals though. Up the Tigers.

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I am deeply embarrassed but have to admit-my granddaughter barracks for the pies. Always a black sheep in every family....

 

Disown her. That sort of shame can break families.

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Guest Suzi Wong

Don't worry about your Scottish accent. Just don't be surprised if everyone asks what part of Ireland you are from! As an East Kilbride girl, I get asked this constantly. My kids are 13 and 16 and we are going out tonight to celebrate our first anniversary in Melbourne. The kids have settled well and have made good friends, no problems at school, etc. I work for a surgeon and every patient seems to be descended from some part of the UK and they love to tell me about it, which is nice. Hubby and me have settled at work and colleagues are all good. You might get the odd dodgy one here and there, but thats life. ;) Hope it all works out for you.

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That has to be some kind of record. Do you ever go out? Must be a lonely life.

 

Well, it is slightly - my wife and I go out occasionally though she works at weekends now so day trips are off. It is rather strange as in the UK I was quite gregarious, mainly with work colleagues, with a wide circle of friends - here I get on well with colleagues but they tend not to socialise together.

 

I have never encountered any anti-UK bias anywhere in Melbourne and now Geelong where we live. I am older than other members of my team which doesn't help, and am not much of a drinker.

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Well, it is slightly - my wife and I go out occasionally though she works at weekends now so day trips are off. It is rather strange as in the UK I was quite gregarious, mainly with work colleagues, with a wide circle of friends - here I get on well with colleagues but they tend not to socialise together.

 

I have never encountered any anti-UK bias anywhere in Melbourne and now Geelong where we live. I am older than other members of my team which doesn't help, and am not much of a drinker.

 

I have never really mixed with people from work, end up talking about work too much, my wife is a nurse and it's invariably what they end up talking about if we go out on her work do's. Prefer to mix with people we know throuogh the surf club, which is our thing. I was talking to another friend at the weekend who loves the surf club and lifestyle as much as we do and he said he knows some other people who's interest is shooting and a gun club in Wanneroo. Whilst it wouldn't be my cup of tea I said that's great as long as people have something in common where they feel relaxed and can mix with people with the same interests, all's well. As long as you find something.

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Nobody cares where you are from, at least not in a negative way! Sometimes, often, in fact, when I hear an accent, I'll ask where they are from, which footie team they go for. I heard a bloke speaking to his kid at Neilsen Park the other day, and I said 'You're English?' (From Manchester, Man Utd), same with a young bloke in the Strawberry Hills hotel recently (Essex, West Ham Utd. - I told him to go to the Royal Exhibition to watch Hammers' games.) The 'locals' are just as likely to be from somewhere else in the World, anyway.

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Hi Scott, just moved to Victoria myself with family and agree that it can be a concern when moving to somewhere unfamiliar, its only natural. The good thing I have found about Victoria is the locals are really friendly and make time to stop and chat, if you engage with them. I was quite self-cons ious at first because of all the Aussie accents around asnd it did feel a little intimidating at first. I am quite reserved person and I guess your immefiate perpective will also depend on your personaluty. I have been in Vic for three month now, I have an 8 year old son who is in school and is noww developing some good friejdships. I think the key is not to worry about how the locals may perceive you and your family as most seem friendly enough. Just be youself and embrace the culteral differences and you will have no problems. Naturally, wherever you go in the world there will be misserable people, but you can't let any negatives overshaddow the positives here. Victoria is a very positive and vibrant place and will lift your spirits, which will in turn make you want to get out and about where you are bound to begin meeting local people.

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Hi Scott, just moved to Victoria myself with family and agree that it can be a concern when moving to somewhere unfamiliar, its only natural. The good thing I have found about Victoria is the locals are really friendly and make time to stop and chat, if you engage with them. I was quite self-cons ious at first because of all the Aussie accents around asnd it did feel a little intimidating at first. I am quite reserved person and I guess your immefiate perpective will also depend on your personaluty. I have been in Vic for three month now, I have an 8 year old son who is in school and is noww developing some good friejdships. I think the key is not to worry about how the locals may perceive you and your family as most seem friendly enough. Just be youself and embrace the culteral differences and you will have no problems. Naturally, wherever you go in the world there will be misserable people, but you can't let any negatives overshaddow the positives here. Victoria is a very positive and vibrant place and will lift your spirits, which will in turn make you want to get out and about where you are bound to begin meeting local people.

 

Thanks for that message..... sounds amazing lol. We are saving every penny af the minute and I am contacting employers to try and get my name out there before go to secure work. Any other advice

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Hi Scott, sorry for the delay in getting back to you following your last thread. In response to you query on other advice. I would find this difficult to answer without knowing what specific advice you require?

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No your wrong we actually do hate collingwood, they have became worse when Eddie took over.

 

Because we can get the people to the matches, we have the big club, we have the money ha ha go Collingwood


Petals

:ssign15:taking no prisoners :wink:

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The thing to remember is everyone here (barring the aboriginals) has emigrated here or is from immigrant stock. You're just the latest in this long line. The average Aussie doesn't have any huge issues with us Poms. They like a bit of leg pulling and banter but I've never had any genuine hostility.

 

However, there are plenty of pompous idiots in the UK that see themselves as somehow superior to the rest of the world. As long as you're not trying to create a corner of a foreign field that is forever England you will have no issues. Just keep quiet about the cricket for the next four years.

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Tell people you're a Melbourne supporter and they will feel pity and sorrow for you and be kind and gentle to you.

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However, there are plenty of pompous idiots in the UK that see themselves as somehow superior to the rest of the world. As long as you're not trying to create a corner of a foreign field that is forever England you will have no issues. Just keep quiet about the cricket for the next four years.

 

Some of them are quite brainwashed, deluded and in need of serious help; the type that love to spoil it for the rest of us.

Edited by gee13

"Once you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth." :biggrin:

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I've Never had an issue. The boys at work call me Pom Pom and that's about it, but then I am a female in the building industry and a Pom to boot, which freaks the boys out sometimes

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I found that Aussies in WA are the most friendliest and welcoming towards me, followed by Victoria, southern Queensland, Adelaide, and Sydney as the least. I've not spent any time up north so I can't comment on the people.

 

One of my best encounters was when I was a little low due to feeling a somewhat isolated in NSW and wandered over to Melbourne for a while. The Aussies I met, upon learning that I was feeling a little dejected and disheartened, not only welcomed me with open arms, they positively hugged me and got me involved in everything. I found them super friendly and welcoming. I think the bar culture is a little more convivial in Melbourne so it helps with settling and meeting people.

 

Overall I have no complaints with any Aussies. Generally speaking I've found you reap what you sow. There have been exceptions, but then I don't get on with everyone I meet in the UK!


T-Bone

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poms are not a rarity so you won't exactly stand out. if you are in vic you will need to be into AFL though as there is not much else talked about during the season!

 

i suppose it will depend on circumstance how well you bond with folk and whether you develop mates local or otherwise. aussies are friendly enough. having said that, i've been here nearly 18 months. i have still got no one locally whatsoever who i would call a friend or even, to say meet for a drink socially, other than my partner, who's away half each week with work.

 

as i write this i wonder where all the time has gone and am amazed that i have had no social interaction with anyone here, locals or expat, outside of work since we arrived here in November 2012.

 

At first this wasnt much of an issue but i am feeling more isolated as time goes by. It was something i never thought of when we moved, i imagined friendship networks would just kind of happen over time. but they havent so far.

 

Do not underestimate starting from scratch here with all your lifelong mates on the other side of the world. it will be probably be hard if you are not used to making new friends, or have little time outside of work in which to do it.

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poms are not a rarity so you won't exactly stand out. if you are in vic you will need to be into AFL though as there is not much else talked about during the season!

 

i suppose it will depend on circumstance how well you bond with folk and whether you develop mates local or otherwise. aussies are friendly enough. having said that, i've been here nearly 18 months. i have still got no one locally whatsoever who i would call a friend or even, to say meet for a drink socially, other than my partner, who's away half each week with work.

 

as i write this i wonder where all the time has gone and am amazed that i have had no social interaction with anyone here, locals or expat, outside of work since we arrived here in November 2012.

 

At first this wasnt much of an issue but i am feeling more isolated as time goes by. It was something i never thought of when we moved, i imagined friendship networks would just kind of happen over time. but they havent so far.

 

Do not underestimate starting from scratch here with all your lifelong mates on the other side of the world. it will be probably be hard if you are not used to making new friends, or have little time outside of work in which to do it.

 

I know exactly what you mean. I know lots of people but they are all acquaintances or else friends/family of my husband (who is an Aussie). I have one English friend but she works shifts and moved away from this area so I hardly ever see her. If I want a good chat then it's my husband/children or else I ring my family back in England - sad really....

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Find a pub, or a cafe, or a restaurant, and go there regularly. Talk to the staff, introduce yourself. Talk to other customers. Smile if someone catches your eye. After two months, I finally introduced myself to one of the barstaff at a new club I joined at Xmas, apoligising that is was my English reserve, making me wait so long. Tonight, I introduced myself to a new bouncer at one of my local pubs, shook his hand, asked him his name. Tomorrow night he will know me better.

 

I've not mentioned their nationalities because it is meaningless. They could be Aussies, they could be Pommies, Irish, or from anywhere else in the world. That barman in the club I joined is from Sweden. I think the bouncer is a Kiwi.

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poms are not a rarity so you won't exactly stand out. if you are in vic you will need to be into AFL though as there is not much else talked about during the season!

 

i suppose it will depend on circumstance how well you bond with folk and whether you develop mates local or otherwise. aussies are friendly enough. having said that, i've been here nearly 18 months. i have still got no one locally whatsoever who i would call a friend or even, to say meet for a drink socially, other than my partner, who's away half each week with work.

 

as i write this i wonder where all the time has gone and am amazed that i have had no social interaction with anyone here, locals or expat, outside of work since we arrived here in November 2012.

 

At first this wasnt much of an issue but i am feeling more isolated as time goes by. It was something i never thought of when we moved, i imagined friendship networks would just kind of happen over time. but they havent so far.

 

Do not underestimate starting from scratch here with all your lifelong mates on the other side of the world. it will be probably be hard if you are not used to making new friends, or have little time outside of work in which to do it.

 

Having done this a few times in the UK in my life, home to Uni in Yorkshire, then to Manchester, then out to Wigan, I've always met new friends/mates/social acquaintances etc., so this doesn't hold fear for me. As a sportsman, a hockey player, when I move I join the local hockey club, and if it's a nice bunch of people, you just do make friends easily that way. The Aussies are a sociable bunch from my experience and reports, so Werriibee hockey club look out when I finally get my visa.

 

Specific to this debate though, I guess what I'm saying is that if you get involved in activities locally with other people, then I think you will make friends. The couple of years when I first moved to Manchester when I didn't play hockey were the toughest for me, as I only knew people through work, had no money to go out anyway, so was largely a hermit. Joined Sale hockey club, instant group of mates, some of which I keep in touch with regularly to this day. So, I'd say to get involved with something, anything, that interests you locally and just do it. Nothing comes to you in this world, in Aus or anywhere else. Go get it, or you'll never have it.


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Having done this a few times in the UK in my life, home to Uni in Yorkshire, then to Manchester, then out to Wigan, I've always met new friends/mates/social acquaintances etc., so this doesn't hold fear for me. As a sportsman, a hockey player, when I move I join the local hockey club, and if it's a nice bunch of people, you just do make friends easily that way. The Aussies are a sociable bunch from my experience and reports, so Werriibee hockey club look out when I finally get my visa.

 

Specific to this debate though, I guess what I'm saying is that if you get involved in activities locally with other people, then I think you will make friends. The couple of years when I first moved to Manchester when I didn't play hockey were the toughest for me, as I only knew people through work, had no money to go out anyway, so was largely a hermit. Joined Sale hockey club, instant group of mates, some of which I keep in touch with regularly to this day. So, I'd say to get involved with something, anything, that interests you locally and just do it. Nothing comes to you in this world, in Aus or anywhere else. Go get it, or you'll never have it.

 

Spot on mate. That's the key to friendships. I can't understand people not getting out and joining something if they are struggling to make friends. I know it's a bit harder for women as they might find it difficult to go and sit in a pub and strike up conversations but judging by how many are in coffee shops up and down the coast road every day, that would be another option.

 

It's certainly easier if you are into some sort of sport. I played squash so joined the local squash club, the kids wanted to join the surf club, so we've been members of that for years. My wife has got into that too as there are so many ladies down there that run training groups just for ladies. Even if it's just getting out and doing pilates, yoga, swimming. There is absolutely heaps of opportunity. No-one is going to come round the house and have a chat, unless it's Jehovas witnesses or something, you have to get out there.

 

I've never been one to socialise with many people I work with, you end up talking about work. There are a couple of guys who I've been to see bands with and we have something in common, apart from that most of the people at work would be the last people I would want to socialise with.

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