Jump to content
jac2011

Dyslexia in Australia

Recommended Posts

Hello,

 

My son is currently being assessed for dyslexia by his school here in the UK and from reading information it sounds likely that he will be diagnosed with on the mild side of the spectrum. This had of course, made us stop and think about Australia as I have to put my children first.

 

Can anyone advise me on their views on this and how it is managed from schools? Are any of the states better than others? I of course, want to make sure my son achieves his potential and I want to make sure that our location is the best their is for him. The rest of us would fit in anywhere.

 

Thankyou

Julie


 

IELTS L9.0 R9.0 W8.0 S8.0 AHPRA 13.2.15 ANMAC LOD 31.3.15 Interview QLD Health Job offer & relocation package 30.3.15 189 PR applied 15.4.15 (medicals 7.5.15) CO contact 03.06.15 Visa Grant 06.07.15

Heading to Townsville 16.9.15

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good luck with that but I wouldn't hold your breath you will get much help over here .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hello,

 

My son is currently being assessed for dyslexia by his school here in the UK and from reading information it sounds likely that he will be diagnosed with on the mild side of the spectrum. This had of course, made us stop and think about Australia as I have to put my children first.

 

Can anyone advise me on their views on this and how it is managed from schools? Are any of the states better than others? I of course, want to make sure my son achieves his potential and I want to make sure that our location is the best their is for him. The rest of us would fit in anywhere.

 

Thankyou

Julie

 

To be honest there is not likely to be much extra support available on a one to one basis, such as an EA. The UK does tend to have far more support available.

 

However, there will always be educational plans that are tailored by the classroom teacher that aim to specifically meet the needs of your child.

 

Your other route may be to go privately, but for mild dyslexia it will probably be the same scenario.

Edited by Sammy1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I may be dyslexic, but I had never heard of it until I got to the UK, maybe it wasnt discovered until the year 2000 or something? if it was known about earlier, it certainly wasnt mentioned, looked for in my school (went to school here in Aus)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think I may be dyslexic, but I had never heard of it until I got to the UK, maybe it wasnt discovered until the year 2000 or something? if it was known about earlier, it certainly wasnt mentioned, looked for in my school (went to school here in Aus)

 

Oh WolveAussie, I do wonder about you sometimes....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

seriously , I had never heard of it... so i dont think it was an issue, it might be now people may be more aware

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most people I knew were never diagnosed with it here in the UK either however there is a growing awareness of it here too, many of my university friends are only just being diagnosed and they all agree it was the best thing to happen to them as they now know that the fault wasn't with them.


 

IELTS L9.0 R9.0 W8.0 S8.0 AHPRA 13.2.15 ANMAC LOD 31.3.15 Interview QLD Health Job offer & relocation package 30.3.15 189 PR applied 15.4.15 (medicals 7.5.15) CO contact 03.06.15 Visa Grant 06.07.15

Heading to Townsville 16.9.15

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not going to get any additional support in Aus anywhere. It doesn't meet the eligibility for any of the disability programs. If a kid is young enough and their reading is delayed they might get some Reading Recovery if the school can afford it. If you go the Irlen lenses route the child will be allowed to wear them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do know from talking to a friend the weekend (UK trained teacher) that Brisbane schools do not recognise or cater for it at all. Cant speak with any actual confirmed knowledgable about other places, but I've heard it's the same.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just reading this thread and actually a bit shocked they apparently don't recognise dyslexia or support children in the education system. Crazy! And who said Australia was better for a child's education? Not if you have some form of disability or learning difficulty it would seem!?


Aymie :wub:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TA support is going to get less funding here in th uk VERY soon so they are going to be a bit of a thing of the past soon. A lot if research suggests that 1to1 support in the classroom is not always the best option. If your son has mild dyslexia I am sure other interventions will be more beneficial for him than 1to1 support. Not sure how it is in Australia so can't say what is best but I am not sure the support we get here in the UK is going to be the same for too long.

 

I have mild dyslexia and mine also wasn't diagnosed until I was teacher training following my degree - think it's pretty common for my generation (think they used to think people were just 'thick' not dyslexic). I was lucky mine was mild so I learnt strategies to hide it so I wasn't branded stupid!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Things are starting to change.

The new minister of education Christopher Pyne has two Dyslexic children http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/special-features/the-other-side-of-christopher-pyne/story-fnho52jj-1226650207749

The below brilliant website has a lot of information

http ://www.defydyslexia.com.au/

 

http://www.defydyslexia.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/Defy-Dyslexia-Contact-List-040913.pdf

 

Also there are some good facebook pages.

 

The following schools in Brisbane/ Gold Coast are Dyslexia friendly

 

Robina State School is an ADA accredited dyslexia friendly school. Mudgeeraba Creek State School, Nerang State School, Nerang State High School, Trinity Lutheran and All Saints are very proactive

and in Melbourne area http://www.monterey.vic.edu.au/ is working on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a fascinating thread. I was oblivious to the different approaches internationally. I had my perceptions but I am surprised by the current trends.

 

I will be honest and say that a good teacher can inspire and motivate as well as support a huge range of children through appropriate differentiation. This can sound idealistic and naive but I would stand by it based on the practice of my colleagues. At the same time, lack of understanding or support can be detrimental and disengage a child very early on and make progression a challenge. This varied approach I imagine exists everywhere, even within a single school so be prepared for that wherever you decide to live. You already have the best intentions. That's more than some :-)

 

Good luck.Check out the LEXIA program. I haven't used it but I have met people who rave about it.


Agent Aug 13 IELTS W:8.5 R:9 S:9 L:9 AITSL sent 23rd Oct AITSL +ve 30th Dec EOI 3rd Jan Invite 12th Jan Lodged 15th Jan CO 12th Feb. GRANT 12th Mar '14 Landed Aug '14

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just reading this thread and actually a bit shocked they apparently don't recognise dyslexia or support children in the education system. Crazy! And who said Australia was better for a child's education? Not if you have some form of disability or learning difficulty it would seem!?

 

But who did say that? It has been well known for as long as I have been around the forums (five years), that there is more support in UK for those with learning difficulties.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
But who did say that? It has been well known for as long as I have been around the forums (five years), that there is more support in UK for those with learning difficulties.

 

many threads saying the oz education system is better etc etc, my point was, not for all..eg..people with disabilities/ learning difficulties.


Aymie :wub:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
many threads saying the oz education system is better etc etc, my point was, not for all..eg..people with disabilities/ learning difficulties.

 

As I say, I have only ever heard about how Australia fares less favourably.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is fairly well known that Australia is great for education of the average kid. It is hopeless with children with a mild disability ( better if it is a significant disability). It is hopeless with really brainy kids, too. They just don't want to know. Private schools are sometimes better but oh, you pay dearly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thankyou for all your advice, it is shocking to think that schools are so inadequately prepared for children who have any form of LD, hopefully like the mental health system they are just behind the UK and will eventually start improving.

 

My son has no clear diagnosis yet so but I felt it necessary to have an understanding of the system. I have emailed Robina state school yesterday to ask for information on the support they would be able to offer.

 

Something that I think parents may need to take into consideration. My childrens futures are the reason we are moving so we would have to be reassured the move would be beneficial.

 

Vandeux you are right a good teacher certainly makes all the difference, its a shame all the poor teachers in the UK and Australia don't realise this! My children are in a fantastic school where the teachers treat the children as their own.


 

IELTS L9.0 R9.0 W8.0 S8.0 AHPRA 13.2.15 ANMAC LOD 31.3.15 Interview QLD Health Job offer & relocation package 30.3.15 189 PR applied 15.4.15 (medicals 7.5.15) CO contact 03.06.15 Visa Grant 06.07.15

Heading to Townsville 16.9.15

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A good place to start would be to look at the Dyslexia Speld organizations in each State - http://www.dyslexia-speld.com/tabid/102/Default.aspx. This is the WA one. They provide tutoring, assessments, resources and information to schools, parents and are proactive in raising awareness of dyslexia. I have a severely dyslexic son who has gone through the education system in Perth and done really well. He is covered by the 1992 disability discrimination act as he has a specific learning disability and therefore requires accommodations and adaptations for him to access the curriculum. In reality this did not always happen but as a parent you have to proactive. If he could not read the homework or it was too hard then I sent it back and asked for it to be adapted. In high school he had a small card he gave to every teacher at the beginning of the year saying he had dyslexia, this means I can not copy from the board, please don't ask me to read aloud, I will take longer to complete work etc etc. He was allowed to use a computer in all lessons from year 8, he had audio books and was given extra time in all his exams. Many ed dept schools don't have sencos/ learning support teachers and the the class teacher is meant to put things in place. However this is beginning to change and some of the schools in more needy areas now have learning support teachers. Private schools are better - most catholic schools in WA will have a learning support teacher and all have access to an ed psych who knows about dyslexia. My son is now at Uni and again, adaptations are put in place and he has extra time in his exams. You may have to fight for the help but it is there, and the schools know about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know nothing about the support in school in either country. But I am moderate to severe dyslexic. I was diagnosed aged 21 by fluke - at school I was just put down as thick.

 

But what I can say is that specialist support is vital and can provide overcoming scenarios. When I left school I was told I had two options. Join the army or the careers service would put my name down for a job with the bin team in the council. I chose the former. But since being diagnosed and receiving help, I have gained a law degree, a post grad in law, a geology degree and a masters. I know without the help and support I would not have achieved this.

 

I don't know how universities in Oz deal with it, but my uni was fantastic. Particularly Leicester where I did geology. There were guys on my course that could barely write their own name, but gained 1st class degrees and more than one has since gained a phd. I would therefor also look at how unis in Oz deal with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have found that Universities in Australia have excellent services available for students with disabilities, but more often than not there's the attitude "you're a Uni student and at your age you've got to be the mature one to take the initiative to seek out the services", which is kind of fair enough but they are certainly there and they can offer a lot of intervention or minimal intervention and services depending on what you need/feel you need.


"Is that Luke... as in Luke Skywalker?" | Brisbane, Australia since August 2010 :cool:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just letting you know that I am reading this thread, just been a tad busy being back at uni and all this week.

 

I do have lots of students on my course that had struggled at school but since being diagnosed by the university (Nottingham) have done fantastic. I really think it makes such a huge difference and it has surprised me at how support can change people's lives around.

 

At the moment, my son is doing ok. At times he is above his age in certain things reading for example (despite last year being significantly behind) but then struggles in other areas. It could just be his manner, much like his dad a little too relaxed! However, I am proactive and if he does have dyslexia then I would rather it be picked up now so that we could address this whilst moving and ensure his needs were met.

 

Thankyou everyone for your honest advice. Its nice to here so many people able to share, I know when we were younger a diagnosis of dyslexia was rare, often misunderstood and had a stigma about it. You really are helping me feel better.


 

IELTS L9.0 R9.0 W8.0 S8.0 AHPRA 13.2.15 ANMAC LOD 31.3.15 Interview QLD Health Job offer & relocation package 30.3.15 189 PR applied 15.4.15 (medicals 7.5.15) CO contact 03.06.15 Visa Grant 06.07.15

Heading to Townsville 16.9.15

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest littlesarah
I don't know how universities in Oz deal with it, but my uni was fantastic. Particularly Leicester where I did geology. There were guys on my course that could barely write their own name, but gained 1st class degrees and more than one has since gained a phd. I would therefor also look at how unis in Oz deal with it.

 

In my experience, universities have an academic support unit that can help students who are struggling with any aspect of their life as a student. At my institution, students who have been diagnosed with any type of disability (be it physical, psychological or a print or other learning disability) are assessed and offered support and additional help. On a personal level, I haven't yet met any academics who are unsympathetic to students' requirements, and I know I am more than happy to meet with and help any student, particularly those who I know face additional challenges. I find that students with dyslexia often seem to possess other skills that are helpful to their progress, that I suspect are developed out of the need to overcome those challenges.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am a dyslexia specialist (been here 3 yrs now) and run my own business here for dyslexia. Schools know very little about it and many people still think that Irlen lenses will solve all the problems! Support for anything other than behavioural issues and ASD are exceptionally hard to come by. There is no recognition in most schools here in NSW and it is very much up to parents to help. The good news is there are lots of great programmes that you can implement at home as well as asking the school for some simple accommodations that don't cost anything.

Uni's and TAFE's generally cope better and accommodate learners more in my experience.

If you want any more info feel free to message me!


Becky

Dyslexia NSW www.dyslexia-nsw.com.au

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×