Jump to content
HappyHeart

Do you live in a pommy area?

Recommended Posts

So who lives in a so called pommy area and how many of your neighbours are poms? Did you move there because you thought there'd be a lot of like minded migrants there or wasn't that a factor in your decision?

 

When we emigrated our choice of suburb was based on extensive research on factors like...affordability, proximity to work and decent non fee paying schools....we landed in Woodvale....a well known Pom paradise. A lot of the kids in my childrens school were poms. I don't think it made a huge difference to how we settled. When we bought a house we chose to go to a cheaper suburb not known for its desirability to new migrants but it offered good value housing and wasnt too far from where we were. Last year my son changed schools to be closer to home and he's only one of 2 poms in the class. I can't say the difference has ever struck me or meant anything...if I could afford to I'd probably live in any of the Coastal suburbs not too far from the city and our workplaces...but I cant so we stay in the Northern suburbs. Its literally down to affordability. I work in the Pommy areas frequently and while there are poms there, theres also heaps of Aussies and believe it or not you also find a decent proportion of poms in the more affluent areas too...I was in Floreat today and with some people from Lancashire....I'd say around half of my clients are English and I cover the entire metro area in my line of work...I can't say I see more poms in the northern burbs hence my opinion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We live in an ex pat area quite a distance from Benidorm now. We cannot stand Benidorm. Been three times and don't like the beer swilling, tatoos, hairy armpits, feffing and jeffing everywhere (and that's just the women):wink:.

 

We had no choice when we first came here but to live in an ex pat area as our Spanish was pretty dismal back then. We feel that as we are moving to a country where everyone (well almost everyone) speaks English, this is not so much of an issue for us. We were both adamant that we were not moving to another ex pat area, but I can now see the benefits of living with the ex pats now. They would be in the same boat as us, would have gone through the visa process and would have experienced the same emotions, being migrants themselves.

 

We are very keen to integrate with the Aussies, but will they ever really understand what we have been through and would they really understand. When I worked in Sydney before, I was welcomed with open arms at my two firms, but at the first firm, I did feel like a bit of a novelty act. O

 

On the few occasions that we have stayed in Perth as well, we have had a job to get out of shops. We have got chatting to ex pats or second generation ex pats and that is why we kind of fell in love in Perth in the first place because of how friendly everyone was:err:


IELTS 02/12 = 9's, AQF III 31/05/12, TRA Ass 14/11/12, EOI Submitted 14/11/12, Invite Received 15/11/12, 489 FS Lodged 29/11/12, CO Assigned 01/01/13, Meds 17/01/13 Grant 02/04/2013 189 Independent Visa Invitation 22/04/13, VISA GRANT 01/05/13

Arrived in Perth 09/10/13

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fi I have moved your post in to its own thread, hope you don't mind but I think its a very good question. (Also I can reply now its not in WA)

 

When we first moved to Melbourne we did go off the forums in which areas to live or avoid. So obviously because most of the poms did the same these areas did have a higher number of English. However when we bought our first house we did so because we liked the suburb didn't even see any neighbours until we had moved in. We had Aussies on one side and a lovely Indian family on the other. I have never checked out the neighbours before moving.


If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Guest26012

We live in a so called "pommy " area at the moment. We didn't build our house here because we wanted to be surrounded by poms, and were not. We built here because it enabled us to live near the beach, which is what we wanted. We have no poms in our street, not that it matters tbh. We have ozzies on both sides, South Africans, kiwis and Scandinavian neighbours. We ended up NOR because of my work. I don't care if I am amongst British people, or any other nationality. What matters is that we are happy where we are, and that's all that matters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't live in a pommy area, tbh that was the last thing on my mind when moving. OH had a job to come to in Perth but the company he works for has 4 places here, 2 north and 2 south and we Didnt know which one he would be going to. I had been doing research on the areas round them all and I did turn to him and say I hope it's one of the ones SOR just cos it seemed more for us.

 

I got my wish and its worked out brill for us. I do remember posting on here asking what the area we were planning move too was like, I got one reply which was a link for the local council. Now that is different to when anyone posts abouts some of the more well known pommy areas, then all hell seems to break loose.

 

I would say though, that there is a few more pom accents cropping up in my neighbourhood in this last year. Not enough for our local Coles and Woolies to give us a pommy section though!:cry:.

 

At the end of the day, find a area that suits you and your needs, your budget, your commute, schools etc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Totally agree with your sentiments MadCow.


......Just trying to be helpful so don't shoot me down if my personal views do not coincide with yours! :animal-dog:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not in Aus, no - there isn't really a Pom enclave in ACT they get everywhere! For us it was price and accessibility when we moved in. We had been living in the League of Nations (uni flats) before that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I live in a pommy suburb (1 of the highest in the northern suburbs) but the majority of poms in my suburb are much older. The average immigrant today wouldn't look at my suburb for 2 reasons, age of suburb and price. My neighbours are both 60+, 1 pom and 1 Australian. Across from me all Australian apart from one Indian family but again 50+

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
We live in an ex pat area quite a distance from Benidorm now. We cannot stand Benidorm. Been three times and don't like the beer swilling, tatoos, hairy armpits, feffing and jeffing everywhere (and that's just the women):wink:.

 

We had no choice when we first came here but to live in an ex pat area as our Spanish was pretty dismal back then. We feel that as we are moving to a country where everyone (well almost everyone) speaks English, this is not so much of an issue for us. We were both adamant that we were not moving to another ex pat area, but I can now see the benefits of living with the ex pats now. They would be in the same boat as us, would have gone through the visa process and would have experienced the same emotions, being migrants themselves.

 

We are very keen to integrate with the Aussies, but will they ever really understand what we have been through and would they really understand. When I worked in Sydney before, I was welcomed with open arms at my two firms, but at the first firm, I did feel like a bit of a novelty act. O

 

On the few occasions that we have stayed in Perth as well, we have had a job to get out of shops. We have got chatting to ex pats or second generation ex pats and that is why we kind of fell in love in Perth in the first place because of how friendly everyone was:err:

 

 

My mil lives in a fairly British area north of Benidorm (Denia). I'm always amazed at how many Brits are around there, along with plenty of Germans. She's in a residential home now and the residents are around a third Spanish, a third German and a third British.

 

We didn't live in a pommy area in Perth (Nedlands and Wembley), but there were still a lot of us around! We spent a lot of time and holidays with another three families who had emigrated at the same time as us, but also socialised with lots of Australians, Canadians and anyone else who was around!

There was also quite a lot of us around where we lived in Sydney too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Ptp113

You must be joking!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Frankston, the Peninsula has always been popular with Brits. Hard pushed not to hear an accent around here. Over at Karingal Shopping Centre there are lots of older Brits. So that said families tend to stay in the same area as parents to some extent so lots of second and third generation Brits around here. We did not choose it for that, I guess its the green fields and countryside of the Peninsula that reminds us a bit of Uk and that familiarity attracts us to areas.

 

My Aussie friends always say I have an English type garden and I suppose I do. I am not a fan of strap leaves and stones


Petals

:ssign15:taking no prisoners :wink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't now, but I did. We first moved to Secret Harbour which has a huge British contingent but because it was and is so popular the house prices are kept artificially high so we decided to moved further down the road and built in the suburb we live in now and saved about $150,000 by doing so. We have no Brits on our road at all as far as I am aware although I've not spoken to all of them of course.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't like to live in an area with any predominate nationality. My preference would be a healthy mix and there are signs that the inner city is becoming more diverse. Irish are more noticeable in the streets around me than English. More Indians have been moving in and Chinese are increasing. European languages fairly common as well.

 

Doesn't begin to compare with the diversity of where I lived in London, where English were rarer than where I live now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Essentially we went for where we are because of proximity to work, and because the research we did said it was a good area - which has proven true. There are no poms I know of in our immediate area, and it doesn't worry me at all. I moved here wanting to experience the Australian way of life... and I am. I'm the only British person in two sports groups I regularly attend, and where I work is mostly an Australian workforce. Although I do have some lovely expat friends, I am equally finding I am making more and more Aussie ones too....

 

In Brisbane, if you want a British area, go Northside - lots and lots gravitate there. But for me personally, if I wanted to live in Britain, then I'd still be there! Each to their own though, whatever makes you happiest.

Edited by Tickled Pink

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find it hard to find mixed suburbs in Sydney, currently live in a muslim area of various ethnicities but move to north shore which i guess will be pretty English

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Guest66881

All of our neighbors could be from outer space for all we know, never seen or met them:wink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pretty normal state of affairs out in the burbs.

 

Not for everyone,, we live on acreage and know our neighbors both sides, next door but one and the 2 families across the road. We all watch out for each others properties and its nice to know there is 'someone ' nearby if ever you need help.

 

As for pommy areas, there are a couple of English families settled around here but more Australians. Im not sure id like to live in a higly 'pommy' populated area as i know a few families who do and they always seem to be falling out,lol.. I guess it suits some, as there are a few 'hubs' in and around Brisbane / Gold Coast that seem to attract a lot of English families.

 

Cal x


If you don't go after what you want, you'll never have it. If you don't ask, the answer is always no. If you don't step forward, you're always in the same place...

If you get a chance,take it, If it changes your life,let it. Nobody said it would be easy they just said it would be worth it...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Ptp113
I find it hard to find mixed suburbs in Sydney, currently live in a muslim area of various ethnicities but move to north shore which i guess will be pretty English

 

Pretty Australian you mean..........

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pretty normal state of affairs out in the burbs.

 

Not so, I know a lot of our neighbours! We have next door, true blue Aussie...frequently pops over for a chat....always out tending his garden or riding his bike...looks after the house when we're away, collects our mail etc, he's in his 70s, lives with his wife or 'mum' as he calls her...across the road is Aussie bloke, our age..and his girlfriend, will always speak and come across the road with a beer for OH and an extended chat...we know about 5 or 6 other families too to say Hi to....I don't know where this...you never see your neighbours thing comes from tbh....I frequently try and avoid mine when I need to get going!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our neighbourhood seems to be a pretty eclectic mix...Aussies, Scottish, South African, Italian, Chinese or Korean, not sure, French, Nigerian and Pom all within 2 streets!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My mil lives in a fairly British area north of Benidorm (Denia). I'm always amazed at how many Brits are around there, along with plenty of Germans. She's in a residential home now and the residents are around a third Spanish, a third German and a third British.

 

We didn't live in a pommy area in Perth (Nedlands and Wembley), but there were still a lot of us around! We spent a lot of time and holidays with another three families who had emigrated at the same time as us, but also socialised with lots of Australians, Canadians and anyone else who was around!

There was also quite a lot of us around where we lived in Sydney too.

 

In the past, Denia was predominantly an area with more Germans than any other nationality, but when the tax situation changed in Germany, alot of them sold up PDQ and the Brits and Scandi's took advantage of the cheap prices.

 

It will be a nice "culture shock" for us just to be able to speak to anyone and everyone after living in Spain for the last 8 years.

 

When we lived in Sydney, we only mixed with Aussies and Irish. not sure why.


IELTS 02/12 = 9's, AQF III 31/05/12, TRA Ass 14/11/12, EOI Submitted 14/11/12, Invite Received 15/11/12, 489 FS Lodged 29/11/12, CO Assigned 01/01/13, Meds 17/01/13 Grant 02/04/2013 189 Independent Visa Invitation 22/04/13, VISA GRANT 01/05/13

Arrived in Perth 09/10/13

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i live in a very orthodox jewish area of Melbourne, not seen many poms around here! i really like it though, i didnt come here to surround myself with poms.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×