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The Pom Queen

Living in Australia - What you need to know

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5 minutes ago, unzippy said:

Now that I've been here a year, I'd like to revisit this.

• Lane hogging (not moving left) is rife, because apparently drivers think that moving to the left and letting someone past is some sort of affront to their driving prowess.
• Undertaking (passing on the left) is rife, because of the lane hogging. 
• No-one lets you into lane 1 when you joining the motorway, because that's pushing in.
• No-one lets you out of a T-junction , that's considered queue jumping.
No-one lets you in when merging, that's more queue jumping.
• If you don't move off within a 1/10th of a second of the light changing green you will be punished audibly.
 
• If you stop when the light is amber, god help you.
• Everyone is so paranoid about speeding that they pay more attention to their speedo and not enough attention to the hazards ahead - you see so many rear end shunts its not even funny.

Yet speed limits continue to go down.  Brand new motorways (hopefully) designed with safety in mind - 4 lanes, central reservations, hard shoulders, no sharp corners, nowhere near schools for kid to run onto etc are being opened with permanent 80kmh limits.  That's 50mph!

I think the poor driving stems from two main issues:

Auto - nearly everyone drives auto, it leaves them too much free time with the left hand to use the phone. Wouldn't be so bad if they had a phone holder near eye level, but most drivers keep it down by the shifter or between their legs and use it down there because they think they can't be seen. Results in their head down and not looking where they are going or what's happening around them.

Aussie competitiveness* - 'that my gap, you're not having it!  Therefore I need drive as close as possible so there is no gap for people to get in to.' 
*Also see the lack of waiting to let people out of lift and letting people exit a train carriage before getting on.

Agree with most of these but definitely not the case on those two highlighted where I live in SE Queensland.  Merging is easy.  Pull away at green lights is invariably painfully slow, and ise of the car horn is almost non-existent.


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35 minutes ago, unzippy said:

Now that I've been here a year, I'd like to revisit this.

 

Where do you live, unzippy?

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35 minutes ago, unzippy said:

Now that I've been here a year, I'd like to revisit this.

• Lane hogging (not moving left) is rife, because apparently drivers think that moving to the left and letting someone past is some sort of affront to their driving prowess.
• Undertaking (passing on the left) is rife, because of the lane hogging. 
• No-one lets you into lane 1 when you joining the motorway, because that's pushing in.
• No-one lets you out of a T-junction , that's considered queue jumping.
• No-one lets you in when merging, that's more queue jumping.
• If you don't move off within a 1/10th of a second of the light changing green you will be punished audibly. 
• If you stop when the light is amber, god help you.
• Everyone is so paranoid about speeding that they pay more attention to their speedo and not enough attention to the hazards ahead - you see so many rear end shunts its not even funny.

Yet speed limits continue to go down.  Brand new motorways (hopefully) designed with safety in mind - 4 lanes, central reservations, hard shoulders, no sharp corners, nowhere near schools for kid to run onto etc are being opened with permanent 80kmh limits.  That's 50mph!

I think the poor driving stems from two main issues:

Auto - nearly everyone drives auto, it leaves them too much free time with the left hand to use the phone. Wouldn't be so bad if they had a phone holder near eye level, but most drivers keep it down by the shifter or between their legs and use it down there because they think they can't be seen. Results in their head down and not looking where they are going or what's happening around them.

Aussie competitiveness* - 'that my gap, you're not having it!  Therefore I need drive as close as possible so there is no gap for people to get in to.' 
*Also see the lack of waiting to let people out of lift and letting people exit a train carriage before getting on.

You obviously live in Victoria 

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Just now, Skani said:

Where do you live, unzippy?

Isn’t it obvious?

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On 12/03/2018 at 16:27, KPG said:

Why?

Think about it....

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1 hour ago, unzippy said:

Now that I've been here a year, I'd like to revisit this.

• Lane hogging (not moving left) is rife, because apparently drivers think that moving to the left and letting someone past is some sort of affront to their driving prowess.
• Undertaking ....

I think the reason for the driving is just the fact that Australian drivers don't need to develop the skills when they're a learner, and after that there's no one to teach them.  

We were terrified on the roads the whole time we were in the UK (south of England).   The traffic was SO fast, even on narrow winding roads.  Roundabouts were nervous breakdown territory.  It wasn't that people drove badly, in fact their skills were good - but then they drove to the limit of their skill and expected everyone else to be just as adept.   In Australian suburbs - where Australians learn to drive - the roads are wide and relatively quiet and you don't even have to consider other road users half the time, because there aren't any. You don't have to be aware of how wide your car is because you never have to squeeze through a narrow lane.  And so on.  Then once you've got your licence, you venture onto busy roads and have no idea how to deal with them, but you're on your own. 

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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36 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

I think the reason for the driving is just the fact that Australian drivers don't need to develop the skills when they're a learner, and after that there's no one to teach them.  

We were terrified on the roads the whole time we were in the UK (south of England).   The traffic was SO fast, even on narrow winding roads.  Roundabouts were nervous breakdown territory.  It wasn't that people drove badly, in fact their skills were good - but then they drove to the limit of their skill and expected everyone else to be just as adept.   In Australian suburbs - where Australians learn to drive - the roads are wide and relatively quiet and you don't even have to consider other road users half the time, because there aren't any. You don't have to be aware of how wide your car is because you never have to squeeze through a narrow lane.  And so on.  Then once you've got your licence, you venture onto busy roads and have no idea how to deal with them, but you're on your own. 

Sorry, I'm not with you.

I and my mates were taught to pass the test.  I think that was 11 lessons, therefore 11 hours of tuition. 

Learning to drive happened after passing the test (and am still learning) - when I was on my own, on busy roads.  I guess I learnt by observing other drivers going about their business and by making my own mistakes!

The only difference to Aus drivers is that they have very poor examples to learn from.

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2 hours ago, unzippy said:

Sorry, I'm not with you.

I and my mates were taught to pass the test.  I think that was 11 lessons, therefore 11 hours of tuition. 

Learning to drive happened after passing the test (and am still learning) - when I was on my own, on busy roads.  I guess I learnt by observing other drivers going about their business and by making my own mistakes!

The only difference to Aus drivers is that they have very poor examples to learn from.

You’re in Victoria.  The drivers are recognised as the worst in the country, and even more famous for driving in the right hand lane. 

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Tassie is better, granted.  But not by much.

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2 minutes ago, unzippy said:

Tassie is better, granted.  But not by much.

Older drivers are OK but some of the young ones are shocking drivers.  Weaving in and out of traffic, speeding and just downright pushy (tailgating).

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1 minute ago, Toots said:

Older drivers are OK but some of the young ones are shocking drivers.  Weaving in and out of traffic, speeding and just downright pushy (tailgating).

The older ones were taught in the UK 😉

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Posted (edited)
On 16/03/2019 at 11:53, unzippy said:

The older ones were taught in the UK 😉

Maybe you should look at the idiot UK drivers videos (there are a lot of them).  Diabolical.  Here’s a sampler 

 

Edited by Bulya
Missing link

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And more ‘good pommy driving’

 

 

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And last for tonight’s special, Poms showing the world how not to drive 

 

 

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