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Izabella

migrating with a child with disabilities

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Hi There,

 

We like in Kent, but my husband has just been offered a job in Melbourne. We have a three year-old daughter who has special needs (physical and learning disabilities). She has an English statement of special educational needs and was going to start attending a specialist school this September.

 

I would appreciate any advice on education, medical care, social care help etc. for children with disabilities in Australia.

 

Many thanks

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Guest Guest26012

Hi, welcome to PIO! Can't answer your query but we have a few on here who will be along to help!

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Maybe look at ringing some schools in melb if you know the area where you may move, ask a few schools how they would support your daughter, do they have statemented children etc? Any specialist schools in the area?

im afraid I can't help you with the other questions.


Aymie :wub:

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Hi There,

 

We like in Kent, but my husband has just been offered a job in Melbourne. We have a three year-old daughter who has special needs (physical and learning disabilities). She has an English statement of special educational needs and was going to start attending a specialist school this September.

 

I would appreciate any advice on education, medical care, social care help etc. for children with disabilities in Australia.

 

Many thanks

 

As far as I can tell, from reading on the forums for several years, your daughter is unlikely to get the same level of help that she needs in Australia versus UK. I really would think hard about this move before you give up the specialist help that you have lined up for her.

 

Are you thinking of moving for a fixed period of time only? i.e. on a temporary visa?

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She would have to be assessed to obtain (for the school) funding for extra needs. If she does not fulfill the diagnostic criteria of a range of conditions that attract funding, then no individual funding would be allocated. Unfortunately, it seems that a "label" is required, such as ASD, HDD etc. for gov't funding. PDDNOS ([a] pervasive development disorder not otherwise specified) does not attract funding. That said, individual schools can act on their own and assess your child for an IEP (Individual education plan) if they deem fitting/appropriate

 

Good luck


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As far as I can tell, from reading on the forums for several years, your daughter is unlikely to get the same level of help that she needs in Australia versus UK. I really would think hard about this move before you give up the specialist help that you have lined up for her.

 

Are you thinking of moving for a fixed period of time only? i.e. on a temporary visa?

 

Sadly I have to agree.

Has your daughter already been assessed and passed the medical for the visa?

Think really hard before you give up any specialist support that you receive in the UK.

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We know people who are here on 457 with a disabled child - their difficulty is getting a PR visa


I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

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Do you have a visa? That is going to be your first hurdle before you think of what school support she might get. The catch 22 is that usually if she is ok to get a visa then she won't be needy enough to get support in school. A good agent who specialises in medical conditions would be advisable - Peter Bollard and George Lombard are usually mentioned in this regard.

 

It is easier to get a temporary visa but if you were to do so then depending on the state you may have to pay additional fees for any special ed intervention.

 

If you already have validated visas as PR then it depends on the state as to the level and type of intervention that is available. Some states are heavily into inclusion and closed most of their special schools to focus on inclusion in mainstream either in classes or special units. You will need to provide comprehensive information about diagnosis, cognitive ability, adaptive behaviour, skill level and all other objective assessments as to language development and physical capacity in order to get any support - and there are definite levels of capacity that are required (neediest 2% of population usually). Ah, I see you might head for Victoria - they have the most stringent eligibility criteria in the country btw.

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