Jump to content

You're currently viewing the forum as a Guest
register-now-button_orig.png
and join in with discussions   
ask migration questions
message other members

..and much much more!

Guest guest79615

how much annual leave will i get??

Recommended Posts

Guest guest79615

Ive just read some posts that have made me scared!! :o

At the moment i get nearly 8 weeks annual leave and use it to travel and take full advantage of it, sometimes taking 4 weeks at a time, my oh is the same....i was thinking i would have same in Oz and get to explore the country...but apparently most people only get 4 weeks a year??! I currently work for the NHS and will work for New South Wales in a hospital...will i still only get 4 weeks?! That will be a shock! The woman at the interview told me about annual leave but i cant remember what she said, i will contact my job but just wondering if anyone knew... xx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest guest79615

New South Wales Health i mean ;) xx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know if it is any different in the health service, but 4 weeks is pretty standard in private sector. Not many would be getting 8 weeks in private sector in UK either!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4 weeks has been standard in all 3 jobs I've had including government/Queensland Health. The only way around this is flexi leave if available or unpaid leave. I've had to take over 3 weeks unpaid in the last year!


She'll be right!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You might get 5 weeks if you're a shift worker, plus public holidays. Don't know about NSW but in WA you have to accrue the time before you can take it. If you work an 80 hour fortnight you'll get an accrued day off each month - some places roster these for staff so as not to attract leave liability whilst others might let you accrue them.

Edited by ali

I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Qld health gets 5. 6 if you work shifts plus long service leave accruing.

 

Leave entitlements

 

Annual leave

 

 

 

  • Nurses and midwives receive five weeks paid annual leave (six weeks for shift workers). You can also choose to take leave at half-pay for double the period of time.
  • In addition, 17.5% loading on annual leave with up to 27.5% for shift workers.
  • Queensland Health may be able to support nurses and midwives with family responsibilities, study or personal commitments by allowing you to purchase up to an extra six weeks leave per year.

 

Sick / carers leave

 

 

 

  • Queensland Health employees receive 10 days sick leave per year, which is accruable.You can use your accrued sick leave to care for a member of your immediately family who is sick.

 

Long service leave

 

 

 

  • 13 weeks long service leave after completing 10 years continuous service, which can be taken pro rata after completing seven years continuous service.

 

Parental leave

 

 

 

  • 14 weeks paid maternity or adoption leave which may be taken at half pay for double the time.
  • One week paid spousal leave which may be taken at half pay for double the time.
  • Employees on maternity, adoption or spousal leave are also entitled to take a period of unpaid leave.

 


See my art here: https://kevindickinsonfineartphot.smugmug.com/

Copies free to PIO members. PM me for details.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest guest79615

ooh thanks for that johndoe, not as bad as i thought then :) xx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Say goodbye to that 8 weeks! you will be doing amazingly well if you get 6.... 4 is the norm. This is based on nurses I know working in Brisbane.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What John said wasqld health not nsw though. I believe it is 4 weeks, more depending on the shifts you work. Also you have to work 3 or 6 months before you can take annual leave, its not just given like in the UK.


Aymie :wub:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Say goodbye to that 8 weeks! you will be doing amazingly well if you get 6.... 4 is the norm. This is based on nurses I know working in Brisbane.

 

Only for private. See my post above.


See my art here: https://kevindickinsonfineartphot.smugmug.com/

Copies free to PIO members. PM me for details.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest guest79615

take the good with the bad i guess !xx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

http://www.dpc.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/file/0004/103774/Personnel_Handbook.pdf chapter6 gives you the leave entitlements but basically 20 days annual leave accrued over a year then sick leave, parental leave, special leave et may all add a few days for specific purposes if you happen to be sick, moving, bereaved or have a sick kid. I don't know about U K but you have to accrue most types of leave so if you get really sick very early on you won't have the sick leave to cover you and if you want to take a 4 week vacation, you won't be able to do that until you have worked a full year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The place I work lets you go into negative leave so you don't have to accrue it first. They also let leave accrue and you don't have to take it one year to the next if you are planning a big holiday. We have such good times at weekends that I really don't miss going away on holiday, I am quite happy to stay home as the weather is good, the beaches are great and close to home.

 

My wife works for Ramsay Health Care and they can pay for extra days out of the salary, bit like unpaid leave I guess. There are also statutory holidays that everyone gets and the long service leave outlined in JohnDoe's post.

 

There is also the part time option if you can afford it.

 

My son is a sparkie and they get a lot of leave. On top of the 4 weeks annual they got 2 days per Month rostered days off (RDO's). Some sites get one day per month but work shorter hours. Then when he left a job he got a lump sum payment.

 

The unions here have negotiated some pretty good work conditions for tradies but non union sites maybe don't have the same deals.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We both worked for the NHS and got about 8 weeks inc. public holidays.

 

Now we work for NSW Health and a non for profit organisation, and with our ADOs (accured days off - 1 per month if you work 40 hrs a week), our AL works out the same, so it's all good. (We're allowed to save up our ADOs and use them all at once, but I think some employers don't let you save up more than a few). Management don't get ADOs though!

Edited by Naomi from Manchester

Not really from Manchester.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Although public sector leave is pretty standard at 4 weeks (nursing may vary), some employers let you do a deal called 48/52 where you receive only 48/52 of your salary and you get 8 weeks leave instead of 4.


Feb 2010 Prospective Marriage Visa | Nov 2010 Temporary Partner Visa | Nov 2012 Permanent Partner Visa | Jan 2015 Australian Citizenship

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For all the NHS gets slagged off,the holidays and extras you get with them are brilliant.

 

You will be lucky if you get anything close.

 

I used to get 45 A/L days (9 weeks) plus 5 compassion days working for the NHS. In Oz i can only get temp work, which ok gives a slightly higher hourly rate but no holiday/sick/compassion pay.

 

The only upside seems to be if you are on contract work, you are allowed to carry holidays over year to year. Wage slips will show what you are entitled to

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No wonder the NHS is bankrupting Britain! 4 weeks plus Bank Holidays is the norm in Britain for anyone doing a regular (i.e. not taxpayer subsidised) job.


Chartered Accountant (England & Wales); Registered Tax Agent & Fellow of The Tax Institute (Australia)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
No wonder the NHS is bankrupting Britain! 4 weeks plus Bank Holidays is the norm in Britain for anyone doing a regular (i.e. not taxpayer subsidised) job.

I'd like to see how far people doing regular jobs would get without those doing "taxpayer subsidised" jobs. The public sector delivers public value - and that means that everyone benefits. The private sector thrives because there's a public sector to provide society's infrastructure.


Feb 2010 Prospective Marriage Visa | Nov 2010 Temporary Partner Visa | Nov 2012 Permanent Partner Visa | Jan 2015 Australian Citizenship

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'd like to see how far people doing regular jobs would get without those doing "taxpayer subsidised" jobs. The public sector delivers public value - and that means that everyone benefits. The private sector thrives because there's a public sector to provide society's infrastructure.

 

A small public sector is of course required to provide society's infrastructure just as you say. The bloated public sector that the UK (and to a lessor extent Australia) has actually prevents the private sector from thriving due to the huge levels of taxation it hoovers ups. It doesn't help that those in charge of the purse strings can't tell the difference between expenditure and investment and so everytime they're told to cut expenditure they actually cut investment and increase expenditure. Firmly in favour of abolishing the NHS and starting over with a system that is fit for purpose. Sorry for irrelevant rant which is completely off topic. Even though I'm now paying my taxes in Australia (and using Medicare) I just can't get over my hatred of the NHS.


Chartered Accountant (England & Wales); Registered Tax Agent & Fellow of The Tax Institute (Australia)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Although public sector leave is pretty standard at 4 weeks (nursing may vary), some employers let you do a deal called 48/52 where you receive only 48/52 of your salary and you get 8 weeks leave instead of 4.

 

I would be interested in that, do you know any companies that do that? And which state?


IELTS: L 9, R 7.5, W 8.0, S 8.5 overall 8.5

Visa lodged June 27th!, CO July 26th

AHPRA sent July 2nd, LOE August 1st

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Firmly in favour of abolishing the NHS and starting over with a system that is fit for purpose.

But even if you scrapped the NHS, you'd still have the same doctors, nurses, PAMS, dentists, etc. All you'd be doing would be rearranging the management. And that has been in a constant state of evolution as long as medical science has existed.


Feb 2010 Prospective Marriage Visa | Nov 2010 Temporary Partner Visa | Nov 2012 Permanent Partner Visa | Jan 2015 Australian Citizenship

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I would be interested in that, do you know any companies that do that? And which state?

Victorian Government does it. I don't know about private sector - they tend to be less flexible about leave I think (except for their CEOs' leave).


Feb 2010 Prospective Marriage Visa | Nov 2010 Temporary Partner Visa | Nov 2012 Permanent Partner Visa | Jan 2015 Australian Citizenship

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A lot better than I get. 11 days and no public holidays. 8 days is compulsory to take over Christmas. So 3 days that I can book when wanted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest littlesarah
No wonder the NHS is bankrupting Britain! 4 weeks plus Bank Holidays is the norm in Britain for anyone doing a regular (i.e. not taxpayer subsidised) job.

 

Off topic I know, but the annual leave and other benefits acted as an incentive for me to keep my experience and niche specialist interest in the NHS. Otherwise I'd have just gone into private practice, leaving behind the new grads to deal with complex cases that they don't really have the experience to manage by themselves. Which is a bit how it is over here, from what I see.

 

Anyway, it seems like there is some difference between professions both in the UK & Australia, which I'm guessing relates to the way in which different services operate with different staffing models.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
No wonder the NHS is bankrupting Britain! 4 weeks plus Bank Holidays is the norm in Britain for anyone doing a regular (i.e. not taxpayer subsidised) job.

 

5 weeks (25 days) is more the norm IME, which is all private sector

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×