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whoiam

I'm planning a book on migration--can you help me?

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Hi guys, firstly I'm not sure if this is the right section to be posting this but I'm sure Kate or a mod will reassign if necessary.

 

To be honest I'm not much of a writer--especially of the fiction variety. I blog. I started blogging after numerous attempts at trying to start a book and ending up with the first page or two.

 

This time I hope its going to be different. I've been blogging about our migrant journey for several months. I'm enjoying writing and different aspects and dimensions of the whole migration process is rearing its head begging to be written.

Its not going to be entirely about migrating to OZ, but much much more.

I hope to be able to give a voice to the trials and tribulations migrants face--unique challenges that only we know about.

Here I would like your help. I have prepared a questionnaire kind of thing --mainly to do with one aspect the book plans to address. If you would like to tell me your story, or if you would like to check out the questionnaire and fill it in for me I would be very grateful. I don't intend to spam anyone with the questionnaire (its kind of very short so don't get put off with the term questionnaire ) so please indicate on here if you would like to contribute.

 

Any other suggestions and ideas are also welcome.

 

I take confidentiality very seriously and will only publish any personal details with express permission

Edited by whoiam
To add note on confidentiality

Don't judge even if you've walked a mile in their shoes. They haven't walked in yours yet!

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Oh Noooo! 17 views and not one response? Faux pas?


Don't judge even if you've walked a mile in their shoes. They haven't walked in yours yet!

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Guest Guest16631

..........I would like to help ........though its over 20 years since we came here............a different process now I think.........but I wish you well in your endeavour...........it should be a help to many..........good luck....tink x

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Our story. I was studying my masters at the University of Leicester in Applied Geology and wasnt sure what was going to come next. Was thinking about a phd or a role in Africa. On a Wednesday afetnoon there was never any teaching a guest lecturers would come and give a talk. One particular week it was a chap called Prof Ian Plimer, who one or two people on here may have heard of. He was the basis for the Billy Connoly film about the man who sued god. He is also a well known geologist and author. Anyway, his speciality in geology is Broken Hill, which is a lead zinc deposit. After the talk, one of my supervisors, who had arranged him to come, introduced me. Well, we went for a coffee to chat about lead and zinc and what i didnt know is that Ian is also a director of a mid size mining company based in Sydney. Well, we got on well and all of a sudden he blurts out that of course i will be coming to work for him in a few months time in Sydney once i finished my masters. I sat there a little dumb stuck and he just looked and said that he was very serious and would have someone get in touch when he got back to Oz to get visas arranged and a contract out to me.

 

I remember going home that night and walking in and the wife asking as normal if i had had a good day and me just saying yes and by the way we are going to have to move house. Now, at this time we had been VERY poor. We were living on about 100 gbp a week and some weeks it was a toss up of what we could have - gas, electric or pay the mortgage. As a result we had been in trouble with the mortgage once before and nearly lost the house. Anyway, my poor wife looked at me and obviously thought something disasterous had occured and we were going to lose the house. Such a shame as my course was only a few months from finishing. Anyway, i realised what she was thinking and immediatly said, dont worry. Its because we are moving to Sydney! I told her what had happened and it such a sense of excitment. It felt like christmas day.

 

Then, though, it started to feel unreal as the weeks passed. I didnt know, but Ian was not going straight back to Oz, but doing a long tour of the USA. Anyway, i think i stopped believing it and started looking for another job. Then, one day an email popped into my inbox with a contract attached! It was just surreal. The next thing i knew we were going through the 457 visa process.

 

But the funny thing was that none of it felt real. That was the case for my and my wife. Or at least it was until we had our leaving party that her dad through for us about 10 days before the flight. I think it was then it dawned on my wife we were moving to Australia. But it still didnt really sink in with me. I suppose that is because the masters was still on and the deadline was 2 days before the flight. I remember that week not once thinking about the move as i in effect lived in the univeristy day and night trying to get my work finished.

 

I, and the rest of the guys on the course submitted our work on the wednesday morning at 10am. We had for months planned a huge party, but we went to the pub and were all so tired i had 2 drinks and went to bed to get some sleep. I didnt even know the shipers had been to the house and we had a room full of boxes. I also suddenly remembered that the little matter of selling the house hadnt yet happened. Ooops as we only had about a hundred pounds to our name without it. We had decided a while before to sell it to one of these companies that offer to buy your house. It had been valued at 120k and the company were only willing to pay 85k, but we knew we must have the sale in order to move to Oz. It would still leave enough to cover some debts in the UK and have enough to get us settled in Oz. We werent taking any furniture, just personal things. The company in Sydney had only given us an allowance of bought 10 cubic meters. So, i got on the phone and was assured completion would take place at 9am the following day. I also then remembered that we hadnt figured out what to do with our 3 cats! Finding home for 1 can be hard but three! Anyway, i raced around the avenue knocking on doors and 3 our our neighbours agreed to take one each. They had been raiding these neighbours for food anyway. Phew.

 

So, with that sorted i was in bed by 4pm and having not had a real nights sleep for the last week, slept like a baby till 8am. In the mean time the removal people came and took our boxes.

 

I got up feeling refreshed and waited for 9am and the completion of the house. The time came and went. We had to be on a train at 4pm to London and i didnt even have to cash to buy the tickets till the house money was in. Anyway, after some frantic calls, it was in the bank about 10:30.

 

But now i have the next problem. I hadnt really thought about how to get all this money to the other side of the world and make sure it was safe. So, i drew it out in cash and ran to WH Smiths where they had a travel money. I changed most of it into Oz notes and a load into travellers cheques and ran home.

 

Only one more thing to sort out. We still had a house full of furniture and we have to be at the train station in less than an hour. So, only one thing for it. I ran around the poor neighbours again and said if there is anything they want, please take. I gave several spare keys and asked them to pop in the letterbox when they were finished. Hugged a couple who had become good friends and headed for the station.

 

We were staying that night with my wifes brother in London as we had a very early morning flight. I remember him picking us up and taking us home and cooking a good meal and some good wine and having a very perculiar time. The reason being that not only is my wife very close to her brother and his family, but so am i. He is like a brother to me as well.

 

Early next morning, we were at Heathrow and on our way.

 

The flight was fine and we landed in Sydney very nervous as we had no stamp in our passport and although i knew we didnt need it, it still felt wrong. The funny thing was, we were so excited at first, but then the drive from the airport goes through some not very attractive areas to say the least and there was a time we both thought "oh no, what have we done". But it didnt last and the hotel we were bokked into by the company was great.

 

The next morning though we had to be up early and at it as we only had 2 weeks in the hotel to find somewhere to live so i had got viewings arranged staight away from England (I managed to remember thing).

 

It was actually great fun going to the viewings, but very tiring as we were doing about 8 a day and looking around for furniture.

 

But, it was also starting to get a bit worrying as time was slipping by. Then day 13 was suddenly on us. We had to leave the hotel the next morning and i had to fly to work in regional NSW. Oh my god. We are about to be homeless in a forign country. Anyway, that afternoon we spotted a property we really liked the look of on line and it was being advertised by the owner. So we called and said we will take it before we even see it. We met him that evening and it was better than we could have hoped. More expensive than we wanted to pay, but stunning with a hug balcony with a view of the harbour bridge. That meant a lot to me as my grandad helped build it when it was built in Middlesbrough.

 

The next morning i signed off the bill at the hotel at 5am and jumped in a taxi to the airport for my 2 week stint in the bush. My wife moved into the appartment that morning with not a single piece of furniture or household things. She slept on the floor with her jacket as a blanket for the 1st week.

 

But over the coming weeks we got everything we needed. One of the best feelings was the visit to Good Guys for the electicals. We had never had anything nice and most of our furniture was very old hand me downs from family, that was in VERY bad condition. The sofa had springs coming through that would impale an unsuspecting guest. So, to walk around Goody Guys with a assistant trailing and me pointing saying i will have this and that was an amazing thing! I insisted on two extrvagances. One was a huge fridge freezer that had an ice dispenser and the other a flat screen 32" TV. You might think a 32" is not much of an extrvagance. Particularly today when most have these enourmous things. But remember, the best we had ever had was a little portible black and white box of a TV. To us it seemed massive.

 

Well, the time flew buy and as we settled in we also had an addition to the family. Our little boy. Mickey the Chihuahua.

 

Unfortunatly, it was becoming very apparent that my job was in threat as the GFC was causing the lead and zinc price to collapse and redundancies were in the offing. So i had no choice but to look for another job as redundancy would have meant only 28 days to find something. Anyway, 6 months after arriving i secured a job in Perth and we moved to west.

 

The finding a house thing went just the same way, with us finding our house on the last day available.

 

It was 5 years ago in May that we landed in Sydney. Time flies. It has been a good 5 years. Where we will be in 5 years time i dont know. Maybe still in Oz, maybe back in the UK or maybe somewhere else. But, while it has been a rollercoaster, its been a fun one.

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My main suggestion - make your font bigger. I view the forums on my ipad and I can barely read what you have written. I'm sure I would be happy to help and fill in a questionnaire if I could comfortably read what it is you want it for though.


Any fool can criticize, condemn, and complain but it takes character and self control to be understanding and forgiving.

Dale Carnegie – 1888-1955, Author and Lecturer

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Oh Noooo! 17 views and not one response? Faux pas?

 

I was typing and trying to work. I will do your survey tomorrow as got to get this report done today. Hope you like the read.

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Oh Noooo! 17 views and not one response? Faux pas?

 

The problem is with your font size, I decided not to give myself eyestrain trying to read it. Go back to your original post and fix it up.

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Guest littlesarah

Maybe you could set up an online quiz (e.g. using survey monkey) if you're after short answers to a few questions. It might be an idea to include on your post here a bit about the general subject area of your questionnaire. I can't tell from your post whether the subject of your questionnaire is something I know anything about it.

 

My experience designing questionnaires and surveys suggests that people are much more likely to take time to answer 'a few questions' if you first tell them the general subject and then be specific about how many questions there are. So you may get more interest if you can spell out what it is you want to know on here.

 

Just a thought. Good luck with it all.

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The problem is with your font size, I decided not to give myself eyestrain trying to read it. Go back to your original post and fix it up.

 

 

Hey guys sorry about the font size. I had posted it whilst on the laptop and hadn't realised how small it was until it was pointed out to me and I got on my iPad!

Now corrected.


Don't judge even if you've walked a mile in their shoes. They haven't walked in yours yet!

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Hi guys,

Basically I am exploring the changing identities we may experience after migration in one of my chapters. So this questionnaire is to do with that. I understand that the responses to the questions may not be suitable for a public forum so please email them to me at themigrantjourney@gmail.com

 

But of course you are free to post the answers here if you don't mind sharing them with PIO. I really appreciate your time and am very grateful for your help.

 

 

 

  1. Are you a migrant? Have you ever migrated from one country to another or from one place to another that was culturally different to your point of origin (e.g interstate).
  2. Are you living in the place of your birth?
  3. What nationality are you?
  4. What nationality were you born with?
  5. What is your ethnicity?
  6. Where are your parents from? Where would they say they were from? What is their nationality and/ or identity? What is their ethnicity?
  7. What do you feel your identity is i.e. At heart what do you call yourself--e.g a person from such and such a place. (By identity we mean what you would call yourself at heart e.g British, English, Irish, Indian, Fijian, Australian etc )
  8. Is your identity (or how you see yourself)the same as your nationality.?
  9. If not can you describe why you feel at home with your identity and why you dont feel that your nationality is your identity.
  10. If your identity is the same as your nationality -- have you always felt this way? For example if you acquired British nationality have you always felt British at heart or was it something that grew on you after acquiring British nationality.

 

 

Any other comments in your own words. Here you can describe yourmigrant journey if you so wish detailing the reasons for migration, the

difficulties and issues faced whilst migrating, the challenges in the new land,and /or the achievements and feeling experienced in the new place.

 

Whilst submitting if you share your name and and email/some contact it would be great. I would only use your name in any form only if you don't mind me telling your story and give consent for the same. I assure all privacy.

Edited by whoiam

Don't judge even if you've walked a mile in their shoes. They haven't walked in yours yet!

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I was typing and trying to work. I will do your survey tomorrow as got to get this report done today. Hope you like the read.

 

Thank you verystormy for your beautiful post.


Don't judge even if you've walked a mile in their shoes. They haven't walked in yours yet!

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Maybe you could set up an online quiz (e.g. using survey monkey) if you're after short answers to a few questions. It might be an idea to include on your post here a bit about the general subject area of your questionnaire. I can't tell from your post whether the subject of your questionnaire is something I know anything about it.

 

My experience designing questionnaires and surveys suggests that people are much more likely to take time to answer 'a few questions' if you first tell them the general subject and then be specific about how many questions there are. So you may get more interest if you can spell out what it is you want to know on here.

 

Just a thought. Good luck with it all.

 

 

Thanks Littlesarah! Yes my topic is 'identity' or something like who do I think I am? Especially with regard to where we come from. Being a many time migrant myself I fully realise that it can change over time and place. So it will be interesting to explore when this transition happens for others and how closely it is related to nationality.


Don't judge even if you've walked a mile in their shoes. They haven't walked in yours yet!

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I thought I would get the ball rolling, I don't think there is anything in my answers that need to be a secret. See comments in red. :biggrin:

 

 

But of course you are free to post the answers here if you don't mind sharing them with PIO.

 

 

  1. Are you a migrant? Have you ever migrated from one country to another or from one place to another that was culturally different to your point of origin (e.g interstate). YES
  2. Are you living in the place of your birth? NO
  3. What nationality are you? BRITISH
  4. What nationality were you born with? BRITISH
  5. What is your ethnicity? Caucasian
  6. Where are your parents from? Where would they say they were from? What is their nationality and/ or identity? What is their ethnicity? In order of questions...England and Ireland. England and Ireland. British and Irish. Caucasion
  7. What do you feel your identity is i.e. At heart what do you call yourself--e.g a person from such and such a place. (By identity we mean what you would call yourself at heart e.g British, English, Irish, Indian, Fijian, Australian etc ) Using this definition of identity, I feel British.
  8. Is your identity (or how you see yourself)the same as your nationality.? YES
  9. If not can you describe why you feel at home with your identity and why you dont feel that your nationality is your identity.N/A
  10. If your identity is the same as your nationality -- have you always felt this way? For example if you acquired British nationality have you always felt British at heart or was it something that grew on you after acquiring British nationality. N/A

 

 

Any other comments in your own words. Here you can describe yourmigrant journey if you so wish detailing the reasons for migration, the

difficulties and issues faced whilst migrating, the challenges in the new land,and /or the achievements and feeling experienced in the new place.

 

Whilst submitting if you share your name and and email/some contact it would be great. I would only use your name in any form only if you don't mind me telling your story and give consent for the same. I assure all privacy.

 

My migration might be easier than some people's as there are just the two of us and we do not have the responsibility of children and I think it is perhaps easier to risk making a potential mistake for yourself than it would be if your mistake impacted little people. So what I am saying is that we didn't really spend a long time thinking before we applied for the visa, in fact we applied on a bit of a whim. I have never had any yearnings for Australia, the USA was always the country that attracted me but it is too hard to get to. My OH always liked the idea of Australia, but would never have instigated a move, in the end that came from me ... on that whim I mentioned.

 

After we got the visa, we didn't really know what to do for the best. We know and had evidence of how hard it is to secure work from overseas, we toyed with a couple of options, me going on ahead for a few months was one such option. We thought about making the move quickly, we thought about leaving it a few years. We were indecisive. In the end, we decided to job hunt on our validation trip and we both came up trumps. We still didn't know whether to do it or not, as we were happy in the UK and had a house we loved. But we did say that with two job offers lined up, there would never be a better time to move, so it was either move now or forget about the whole thing. We decided to go for it.

 

Next few weeks went by in a blur, 3-4 weeks to get everything done. I had to go on ahead in the end as I wanted a couple of clear days before starting work but couldn't get the packers in any sooner. I always feel sad that we did not catch that flight out together. I always tell people now, to come over together if they possibly can. Still three days later was very exciting day when OH arrived.

 

OH was happy and settled from day one. I felt like I had been beamed down onto planet Zog for the first few weeks, however once we found our rental home things started to look up for me. We are still renting the house we found in those first few weeks. We are still in the same jobs, well with the same employers. My OH was promoted after about a year and I was also given a new internal opportunity that is suiting me down to the ground and will be great on the CV.

 

This is our third christmas coming up, I am hoping to make something of the day but it is just the two of us and is just not as much fun as christmas at home. Last christmas we saw family. We think we will try to alternate as it wont be possible to see family every year. I just realised I said "christmas at home", weird as generally home is here but perhaps not at christmas....

Edited by Rupert

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Thanks Rupert for that. I liked what you said about 'home'. Sometimes the subconscious speaks louder than our words. Home, they say, is where the heart is. Often the word home is associated with a lot many associations like our parents, family, siblings, Christmas dinners,-- and this remains such even though our physical home might have crossed continents. It implies our sense of belonging and is crucial. I am always interested in when this changes in a persons migrant journey. Home in that sense has changed just once for me and never since. I spent my childhood in Nigeria and that was home for a long while even though technically it wasn't my country of birth. I later lived in India and eventually that became home. Have lived in Britain for the past ten years, changed nationality, and migrated further but 'home' has remained a constant till date. Guess there are two homes. - one that houses our immediate family and in which we live, and the other one, a kind of metaphoric one to which our heart belongs!


Don't judge even if you've walked a mile in their shoes. They haven't walked in yours yet!

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Shipping arriving tomorrow . So excited. Can finally put up the tree and maybe our house will start looking more like our 'home'!


Don't judge even if you've walked a mile in their shoes. They haven't walked in yours yet!

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