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The Pom Queen

British Expats Voting in UK Elections

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I just read the article below, to be honest it doesn't bother me about voting in the UK when Australia is now my home, what do others think?

 

A 90-year-old UK national’s campaign to reverse legislation banning long-term British expats from voting in UK elections, is moving forward - and may reach the United Nations.

In 2009, Harry Shindler took his campaign to the European Court of Human Rights; a decision is due to arrive within the next few months.

However, if the WWII veteran is not successful, he is ready to take his file of evidence to the United Nations for a verdict on human rights implications.

 

It is not “a small matter”, argues Mr Shindler, as it has an impact on one million British nationals. There were “hundreds of thousands” of young people who died in World War II so Britons could vote, he says. He was there, he adds.

 

During the war, people did not know that one day there would be a government which would say they could not vote, said the war veteran. Under British law, expats who have lived overseas for over 15 years are not able to vote in UK elections.

 

Harry Shindler has not had the right to vote in UK elections since 1997. In 1982, he moved to Italy in order to be near his grandson. However, he cannot vote there either.


If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present.

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I live and vote in Australia , so not to fussed about voting in the UK.

 

Cal x


If you don't go after what you want, you'll never have it. If you don't ask, the answer is always no. If you don't step forward, you're always in the same place...

If you get a chance,take it, If it changes your life,let it. Nobody said it would be easy they just said it would be worth it...

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if he moved to Italy then he shoudl get Italian citizenship and then he can vote there. Either way, politicians in Australia and Uk have shown themselves up to be scumbags and not worthy of being elected. I couldn't give a stuff about the UK any more because none of the parties there are worth my vote but I also don't believe in compulsory voting either.

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Guest Ptp113

Wouldn't have a clue who to vote for for so not much interest here I'm afraid

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Honestly not fussed about voting in the UK - I don't live there at the moment

 

I didn't feel the need to vote - our pursue voting - in the past when I lived abroad, either

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I think you should vote where you pay your taxes. If he still pays UK tax then he has a right to say where that goes.

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No, I'm not interested either. I'm not living there so tbh it wouldn't feel right to cast a vote. I always vote but something about *having* to vote gets my goat. Hey, that rhymed. :cute:


-CrimsonPetal

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Guest AKA63029

You know me and my thoughts on voting Kate,:mad: BUT.

 

If you live and work in Australia as a 'Citizen' then Australia should be your main concern.

 

We get confused now who to vote for in this country when we are here, so god knows what it would be like 10,000 miles away and not 'really' knowing the ins and outs.

 

Australia is now peeps homes, and that is the way it should be.

 

Cheers Tony.

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I didn't vote much back in the UK as they're all as bad as each other.

Same here really - all politicians are the same. I don't have to vote here yet as not got my residency yet, but i take exception to the fact here you HAVE to vote.

If no party holds the values i believe in, it should be my right to refuse to vote. At the end of the day, that's part and parcel of being a democracy.

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Guest AKA63029
I didn't vote much back in the UK as they're all as bad as each other.

Same here really - all politicians are the same. I don't have to vote here yet as not got my residency yet, but i take exception to the fact here you HAVE to vote.

If no party holds the values i believe in, it should be my right to refuse to vote. At the end of the day, that's part and parcel of being a democracy.

 

This is the confusing issue here Thom, you don't HAVE to vote in Australia.

 

Cheers Tony.

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This is the confusing issue here Thom, you don't HAVE to vote in Australia.

 

Cheers Tony.

 

Then it is confusing! One of my mates (he is Australian) was fined for not voting the other year...

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Guest AKA63029
Then it is confusing! One of my mates (he is Australian) was fined for not voting the other year...

 

It's a very confusing issue mate.

 

You HAVE to rock up at the polling station and have your name ticked off, but you can still put whatever you want on the ballot paper, from, 'Nonsense' to anything else you want to put (insert swear word here).:laugh:

 

Approx 95% of voters DO tick a box and the like but approx 5% 'spoil' a paper if you know what I mean.

 

There is also a 'get out of jail' card in the fact that many reasons can be given not to turn up, 'religious' beliefs, but the rules and regs surrounding this are in the process of being changed and no doubt it may be that ALL citizens have to vote, but that will still allow you to 'spoil' a paper.

 

Cheers Tony.

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This is the confusing issue here Thom, you don't HAVE to vote in Australia.

 

Cheers Tony.

 

Then it is confusing! One of my mates (he is Australian) was fined for not voting the other year...

 

After looking on the Australian Electoral Commission - "Compulsory voting means that every eligible Australian citizen (18 years or older) is required by law to enrol and vote. If a person does not vote and is unable to provide a 'valid and sufficient' reason, a penalty is imposed. Compulsory voting is a distinctive feature of the Australian political culture"

I think it basically means once an Australian citizen, rather than permanent resident as i thought, you have to, by law, vote.

My thoughts though are that forcing a vote is undemocratic, infringing our civil rights amongst other issues, but hey, that's just me ranting on!!

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If you don't live in the UK anymore you shouldn't be voting anyway...just focus on whatever new country yo're living in instead.

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We are OZ citizens returning to UK - are we "required" to vote once we are back, if so, how does that work? Do they send voting papers to your new address?

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Guest AKA63029
Then it is confusing! One of my mates (he is Australian) was fined for not voting the other year...

 

After looking on the Australian Electoral Commission - "Compulsory voting means that every eligible Australian citizen (18 years or older) is required by law to enrol and vote. If a person does not vote and is unable to provide a 'valid and sufficient' reason, a penalty is imposed. Compulsory voting is a distinctive feature of the Australian political culture"

I think it basically means once an Australian citizen, rather than permanent resident as i thought, you have to, by law, vote.

My thoughts though are that forcing a vote is undemocratic, infringing our civil rights amongst other issues, but hey, that's just me ranting on!!

 

My post above yours mate should explain, and agree 'compulsory' means turning up, BUT not having to vote.

 

The 'reasons' for opting out are getting less and less and soon enough the Aussies will deter many from doing this, but they can NEVER look over your shoulder and make sure you vote for a particular 'rep'.:cool:

 

We disagree on the compulsory thing mate, but as you say this is not the time or place, each to their own. But you can when a citizen form your own political party, vote for yourself Thom.:yes:

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Guest AKA63029
Then it is confusing! One of my mates (he is Australian) was fined for not voting the other year...

 

After looking on the Australian Electoral Commission - "Compulsory voting means that every eligible Australian citizen (18 years or older) is required by law to enrol and vote. If a person does not vote and is unable to provide a 'valid and sufficient' reason, a penalty is imposed. Compulsory voting is a distinctive feature of the Australian political culture"

I think it basically means once an Australian citizen, rather than permanent resident as i thought, you have to, by law, vote.

My thoughts though are that forcing a vote is undemocratic, infringing our civil rights amongst other issues, but hey, that's just me ranting on!!

 

There was an 'idea' many moons ago in OZ Thom that every ballot paper be numbered and would be able to be 'electronically' read when you voted, and if you spoilt a paper they would know who it was.

 

Now I push for compulsory voting matey, but this is step WAY too far and big brotherish I'm afraid.

 

Suffice to say the idea was dropped within a few weeks.:cool:

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I used to be in favour of the theory of compulsory voting......I thought it would mean everyone was engaged to some extent and would therefore care more, therefore you'd get better service from politicians

 

.....the evidence, however, suggests otherwise

 

A citizen friend of mine (ex Saffer) actually thinks compulsory voting makes them worse - because everyone goes to the polling station, it means there is a greater propensity to register protest votes and try and kick the incumbents up the posterior, therefore it promotes negative campaigning and politicians being obsessed with focus groups, soundbites and populist short termist policies at the expense of anything resembling a programme or vision for how the country ought to be in 10 years+. Looking at the current sorry shower and the way they behave (last week's budget being a typical example) I'd say he has a point

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Guest AKA63029
I used to be in favour of the theory of compulsory voting......I thought it would mean everyone was engaged to some extent and would therefore care more, therefore you'd get better service from politicians

 

.....the evidence, however, suggests otherwise

 

A citizen friend of mine (ex Saffer) actually thinks compulsory voting makes them worse - because everyone goes to the polling station, it means there is a greater propensity to register protest votes and try and kick the incumbents up the posterior, therefore it promotes negative campaigning and politicians being obsessed with focus groups, soundbites and populist short termist policies at the expense of anything resembling a programme or vision for how the country ought to be in 10 years+. Looking at the current sorry shower and the way they behave (last week's budget being a typical example) I'd say he has a point

 

It's a catch 22 Pinpot.

 

That's the main problem, short sightedness.

 

As you say many policies will only 'show' an affect after several years.

 

No easy way around it as most peeps aren't patient (me included) enough to 'wait' for certain policies to do some good, (hopefully).

 

Cheers Tony.

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Well, I agree with those objecting to compulsory voting (sorry Tony! :wubclub:).

 

It was something I never even considered before I moved to Oz tbh. Never had to. And I have always voted and value my chance to vote. However, something about it being compulsory just seems 'off' to me. I honestly have felt stumped in Oz as to who the heck I would vote for and this just feels like I am being 'forced' to make a choice out of a very bad bunch. Doesn't seem very democratic to me.

 

I'm no political expert but a little research has shown me, as Tony has pointed out, that there are ways around it. But I don't think it's in my nature to 'spoil' a paper. That doesn't feel right either. I would just appreciate the choice of being able to decline to vote if I choose to without any penalties or having to find a way round the system. Doesn't seem like a whole lot to ask.


-CrimsonPetal

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Funnily enough, not that many spoil their votes here in Australia. A lot less than you would think- at least in the polling booths I worked in. I think expats should be able to vote if they want to and are interested enough. Why not? Most have paid taxes in their time. It might also have implications for any money left in the UK who is in power- the current lot certainly don't seem to be very good financially.

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Anyone permantaly living abroad should have no say whatsoever in another countries politics....complete madness.


Drinking rum before 11am does not make you an alcoholic, it makes you pirate..

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I think you should vote where you pay your taxes. If he still pays UK tax then he has a right to say where that goes.

 

 

 

I agree, you should vote where you pay your taxes........trouble is that would rule out millions that acually live in the uk.

Also agree that if you pay uk tax you do have the right to say where it goes, probably more right than many uk residents.

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I agree, you should vote where you pay your taxes........trouble is that would rule out millions that acually live in the uk.

Also agree that if you pay uk tax you do have the right to say where it goes, probably more right than many uk residents.

 

Since I can't vote in Aus, I'd be quite happy if they'd remove my tax bill

 

Good idea

:-)

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It's a very confusing issue mate.

 

You HAVE to rock up at the polling station and have your name ticked off, but you can still put whatever you want on the ballot paper, from, 'Nonsense' to anything else you want to put (insert swear word here).:laugh:

 

 

 

Approx 95% of voters DO tick a box and the like but approx 5% 'spoil' a paper if you know what I mean.

 

There is also a 'get out of jail' card in the fact that many reasons can be given not to turn up, 'religious' beliefs, but the rules and regs surrounding this are in the process of being changed and no doubt it may be that ALL citizens have to vote, but that will still allow you to 'spoil' a paper.

 

Cheers Tony.

 

The 'donkey' vote, I believe it will go to the party already in power, so your effectively voting for them whether you want them in or not.

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