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Found 30 results

  1. The Pom Queen

    Kroombit Tops National Park Queensland

    This is one National Park you must put on your to do list. Kroombit parks is known for its natural beauty but more importantly as the final resting place for “Beautiful Betsy” a B24 Bomber and her 8 crew members which departed Darwin on the 26th February 1945. The wreckage of "Beautiful Betsy" was not discovered until 49 years later on 2 August 1994, when park ranger, Mark Roe, was checking a controlled burn. I would like to say that I am astonished on how intact everything still is, there are pieces of the aircraft including the radios and engines all over which could have easily been looted. The drive in to the park isn’t easy and I wouldn’t recommend it in a 2 wheel drive. When you look at the map it looks like Biloela is the easiest entrance but it wasn’t so we ended up driving to Calliope and then down the Development Road which is an unsealed Road and suitable for 2wheel drive vehicles if there hasn’t been any flooding. If there as been rain forget it as there are numerous river crossings. We had the park to ourselves nearly with the exception of two other vehicles one who we passed exiting the park and the other as we were heading home. This park will take you a minimum of 5/6 hours to get around so make sure you leave yourself plenty of time. The Development Road in - Suitable for 2 wheel drives in the dry season. The Lookout The Bomber Crash Site
  2. Alligator-eyes

    Cats in Australia (wildlife)

    Hi We just got our permanent visas approved so now it’s very real! I’m really upset at the thought of leaving my cat behind when we go, I’ve looked into various companies to help with the move and waiting for a few quotes. But I’m concerned about the wildlife-cane toads, snakes, poisonous spiders etc. He is currently my spider catcher and does like to bring in a mouse or two, I’m concerned he might try to catch something that will end up killing him as he’s grown up being able to catch anything. Does anyone have experience of moving with a cat (particularly one which likes to have freedom outdoors) and if there has been any issues with wildlife?
  3. When thinkng about this, you automatically think snake, spider or shark but on the TV just now it said Dogs kill more humans in Australia than any other animal !! A quick Google said its horses but either way none of the animals i had expected, i am actually quite surprised at this. What animal is responsible for the most deaths in Australia? Let's see who is responsible, starting with the biggest culprits: Horse, pony or donkey – 77 deaths. Cow, bull or bovine – 33 deaths. Dog – 27 deaths. Kangaroo – 18 deaths. Bee – 16 deaths. Shark – 16 deaths. Snake – 14 deaths. Crocodile – 9 deaths.
  4. So, hopefully I'll be making the move to Perth at some point - how dangerous is the wildlife? Are surfers at risk from shark attacks? I'm aware red-back spiders are lethal, how common are they? Gardens only or will the come into the house? Will they only bite if they are threatened, or will they deliberately go after my 3 year old son? How about other spiders / snakes? Likely to come into the house?
  5. Hi, This is a first post, so I apologise to any moderators if I transgress any forum rules (I have also posted this on the NT board). We are dual nationals who have been in Australia since 1999 and living in the Top End since 2002. We have a rural property on 23 acres of land about 40kms south of Darwin. The property was previously a mango orchard and we bought it with the express intention of revegetating and restoring the property, and after fifteen years of hard work we have made significant achievements. Due to external circumstances we have to move back to the UK. Although the house is on the market for sale we are also exploring the possibility of renting; however, this is a unique and very special piece of land and we are seeking potential 'tenants' who will both appreciate the flora and fauna and look after both the house and the land. Sadly, the average Australian renter (in the NT at least) does not have the best reputation. Living here we can guarantee you will have incredible experiences of unique plants and animals without having to travel to a tourist haunt. Creatures we share the land with include: agile wallabies, possums, bandicoots, hopping mice, over a hundred species of birds, frogs, native toads, different snake species including pythons over 3m long. And if you want you can spy on both fresh and salt water crocodiles. The house has two airconned bedrooms, a renovated kitchen, a large bathroom, laundry and verandahs; there is solar hot water, on grid solar and a solar bore, so utilities bills are minimal. We would be happy to leave some furniture as required. We would expect you to do some mowing when required, spray weeds when needed and manage and tidy the garden. You will also need to show some initiative as occasional problems arise. More than anything you will need to love, respect and appreciate nature. Rent is negotiable but we are looking to cover our costs and would be using a property agent as a local point of contact. Available from September onwards. We would prefer a 6 to 12 month commitment. This is a great opportunity for a couple looking for a new adventure. Darwin has lots of employment possibilities and is often seen as a good place to advance one's career. You can find out more about the property at landsale.treehugger.com.au and more about the flora and fauna at treehugger.com.au If you need any further information please send a PM.
  6. Hi, This is a first post, so I apologise to any moderators if I transgress any forum rules (I have also posted this on the NT board). We are dual nationals who have been in Australia since 1999 and living in the Top End since 2002. We have a rural property on 23 acres of land about 40kms south of Darwin. The property was previously a mango orchard and we bought it with the express intention of revegetating and restoring the property, and after fifteen years of hard work we have made significant achievements. Due to external circumstances we have to move back to the UK. Although the house is on the market for sale we are also exploring the possibility of renting; however, this is a unique and very special piece of land and we are seeking potential 'tenants' who will both appreciate the flora and fauna and look after both the house and the land. Sadly, the average Australian renter (in the NT at least) does not have the best reputation. Living here we can guarantee you will have incredible experiences of unique plants and animals without having to travel to a tourist haunt. Creatures we share the land with include: agile wallabies, possums, bandicoots, hopping mice, over a hundred species of birds, frogs, native toads, different snake species including pythons over 3m long. And if you want you can spy on both fresh and salt water crocodiles. The house has two airconned bedrooms, a renovated kitchen, a large bathroom, laundry and verandahs; there is solar hot water, on grid solar and a solar bore, so utilities bills are minimal. We would be happy to leave some furniture as required. We would expect you to do some mowing when required, spray weeds when needed and manage and tidy the garden. You will also need to show some initiative as occasional problems arise. More than anything you will need to love, respect and appreciate nature. Rent is negotiable but we are looking to cover our costs and would be using a property agent as a local point of contact. Available from September onwards. We would prefer a 6 to 12 month commitment. This is a great opportunity for a couple looking for a new adventure. Darwin has lots of employment possibilities and is often seen as a good place to advance one's career. You can find out more about the property at landsale.treehugger.com.au and more about the flora and fauna at treehugger.com.au If you need any further information please send a PM.
  7. Guest

    The Wildlife Thread

    Hi Folks. Several people have been mentioning the wildlife in Australia in a few threads and posts recently, so thought I would start this one off. One of the many, many reasons I find Australia fascinating is the uniqueness of it's wildlife, no matter how dangerous, strange etc, I love all aspects of the wildlife, yep, even the roaches, ants, snakes and spiders. I will very rarely kill anything, unless me or mine are in danger, (in which case it is normally my fault anyway.) I am to this day still amazed at the wildlife. When I am out in Australia you will still find me lifting stones, climbing trees, searching the ocean and rivers to see the unique wildlife. I'm like a big kid really when it comes to Australia's wildlife. A lot of people say that there is some deadly creature around every corner waiting to pounce on you, but in reality for the most part the wildlife keeps itself to itself, and really does take some finding. To date I have seen (in the wild) Death Adders, Taipan, Tiger Snakes, Sea Snakes, Tiger Sharks, Carpet Pythons, Box Jellyfish, Bull Sharks, Brown Snake and I was very, very lucky to see in the wild the Inland Taipan (Fierce Snake) which is allegedly the most deadly snake in the world. Took me five days to find one, but eventually was fortunate to find one. Lost count of the insects I have seen, thousands of species I would imagine. But I think to a certain degree the wildlife of Australia is often given a bad name, and for all intents and purposes 'feared' to some extent. When in reality they are an integral part of what makes up Australia. So come on, what are your views and experiences (good and bad) of the Australia wildlife. Cheers Tony.:wink:
  8. I'm hoping to move out to Australia around September with my girlfriend and ideally I'd like to get a job in wildlife / conservation. I'm in my final year of studying Zoology with Conservation at uni at the moment and will be graduating at the start of the summer, I was born in Melbourne but my family moved back to the UK when I was young so I'm an Australian citizen and can legally work there (which seems to be quite a huge advantage looking at the hoops most people have to jump through to get a visa!). I know it's a specialist subject so it might be a long shot hoping anyone can help me with this but I was wondering if anyone with knowledge or experience of this sector could give me any advice? I'm hoping that being a graduate in a relevant subject will give me a helping hand but I know that in the UK volunteering and experience tend to be pre-requisites for a job. I'd be willing to volunteer or apply for internships but I'm worried that I won't have the time once I'm there - I'll need a job to keep myself afloat and can't take on anything that provides accommodation due to me needing to live with my girlfriend to help her visa application once the WHV runs out. If anyone can give me any help or advice on how to find a job that I could be qualified for I would be very grateful, I am aware that as I lack experience I would have to start at the bottom of the pile but it would be brilliant if I could get a paid job that would get my foot in the door for a career in this area Thanks! Tom
  9. Cerberus1

    Wildlife

    Well, it appears as though the local wildlife must be on steroids in the Far North. I seem to recall that moths? in Melbourne weren't this big :eek: (It just knocked itself out flying into the window).
  10. Guest

    Wildlife and sea options????

    Hi all, we are in the process of applying at the moment. My wife is an A+E Nurse so she is all but sorted. My lifelong obsession is reptiles and marine creatures but being from North Wales the only chance ive had to work with these is my private collections or holidays abroad. Obviously im not expecting to drop straight into my perfect job but as there is an abundance of these creatures in OZ i wondered if anyone had any advice that I could take so I can start my research into this from sunny Wales. We are hoping to move to QLD if that helps, Any advice, tips or news would be great Sean
  11. Had to share this with PIO, so funny!! :biglaugh: Taken from Dangerous animals keep tourists in Australia on their toes | The Courier-Mail By Rory Gibson January 14, 2010 11:00pm THE mad bat of the Town of 1770 was the tipping point. Until then I had been successful in reassuring my brother-in-law that he would not be sent back to England's green and pleasant land in a coffin, the victim of an unfortunate encounter with Australia's wildlife. A lot of foreigners think Australia is a deadly place because of a perception that every living thing here has the capability of inflicting upon the unwary an agonising and messy death. Sure, that may be true of Brunswick St at 3am but, by comparison to other continents, our wildlife is pretty tame. But that's not the general wisdom. Popular travel writer Bill Bryson summed up why visitors from overseas think that their first steps outside the international terminal could be their last in his book Down Under: "It has more things that will kill you than anywhere else. Of the world's 10 most poisonous snakes, all are Australian. Five of its creatures – the funnel-web spider, box jellyfish, blue-ringed octopus, paralysis tick and stonefish – are the most lethal of their type in the world. "This is a country where even the fluffiest of caterpillars can lay you out with a toxic nip; where seashells will not just sting you but actually sometimes go for you. Pick up an innocuous cone shell from a Queensland beach, as innocent tourists are all too wont to do, and you will discover that the little fellow inside is not just astoundingly swift and testy, but exceedingly venomous. "If you are not stung or pronged to death in some unexpected manner, you may be fatally chomped by sharks or crocodiles, or carried helplessly out to sea by irresistible currents, or left to stagger to an unhappy death in the baking Outback. It's a tough place." All right Bill, all right. Don't go on about it. The English don't have much wildlife – a few badgers, the odd rabbit – so they are fascinated by ours. Except when it is within cooee of them. My Pommy in-laws have just been visiting for three weeks over Christmas/New Year, and for two of those weeks we were ensconced in a house adjacent to a national park and near the beach in northern New South Wales. The first sign of nerves emerged when a local woman told Scotty, a big, boofy rugby player from the Home Counties, that the kangaroos feeding on our back lawn had been known to become aggressive, and to keep an eye on his two-year-old and four-year-old when they were around. There were some big, muscular male eastern greys among them and they would have done some serious damage to a kid if they got antsy, so that was the end of the morning walks with the toddlers to see the roos feeding. We bought Scotty a three-day learn-to-surf course for his Christmas present and afterwards he would join his Aussie nephews for a dawn surf at what is a reasonably isolated beach. Certainly there are no lifeguards and you can't see any buildings. He was very interested in sharks (out of self-preservation, not scientific curiosity), so we told him all the available lore we knew – early morning and late afternoon most dangerous times to be in water, don't surf alone, stay clear of river mouths, avoid murky water, etc – but assured him shark attacks were very rare. Except that that week a shark attacked a diver on the Barrier Reef, mauling his hand and forearm. "It was just an inquiry nip," the diver, John Pengelly, blithely declared. Quite right John, nothing to worry about except that it put the fear into our Englishman. A couple of days later a fisherman caught a large bull shark in little more than a gutter 15km upstream from Noosa, and it was all over the news. The next morning we had the beach to ourselves, it was drizzling, overcast, a bit foggy. Perfect shark attack conditions. "Why are we the only ones here?" a worried Scotty asked, lying on his board with his legs in the air. "Just lucky, I reckon," I replied. I much prefer shark rage to surf rage. As scared as he was of sharks, he was terrified of spiders, a real arachnophobe. So, as if on script one morning a large redback crawled out of my wetsuit as I was about to put it on. It must have sought shelter there from the incessant rain while it was hanging on the line. Scotty's eyes made him look like ET as he took in the black body with the blood-red slash on its bum. "What will we do with it? Kill it?"' he inquired as I looked around the carpark. He was horrified when I found what I was looking for – a car with NSW number plates – and put the spider on it. I had to explain about State of Origin. You wouldn't believe it, but on the front page of the next day's Clarence Valley Daily Examiner was a photo of a small but venomous snake that had been killed by a redback after it was caught in its web. Scotty, by this time fearful about leaving his room, had also had to come to terms with what a box jellyfish was and the fact that one had nearly killed a young girl 20km from the sea in a central Queensland river. It took a lot to convince him that they didn't travel as far south as Yamba. The several drownings that made the news over this period, while obviously tragic, were almost reassuring in that the victims did not die by fang or claw. But it was the mad bat of the Town of 1770 that bit three people in unrelated attacks, and the description of it crawling down a tree branch with its glittering eyes fixed on its victims, that convinced Scotty that Australia was indeed a hellhole. Back in Brisbane, having a drink on the veranda, we watched the wonderful sight of the fruit bat colony at Enoggera take off for the evening feed, flying in their thousands over our house. The look on Scotty's face was priceless, his mind clearly mulling over the possibility that one of them would swoop for his jugular. He and his family left soon after, sprinting for the plane with what I believe was uncalled-for haste. I hope they don't go spreading any misconceptions about our wildlife.
  12. Guest

    sunshine coast wildlife..

    Would anyone who live on the Sunny Coast happen to know anything about wildlife there??.Do the rainforests still have many species of Gliders,Possums,birds etc.Im thinking of setting up a wildlife carer centre there..Any info would be appreciated before I go there...
  13. Something that most people like to do when they move to Australia is go out, discover the wildlife and shoot themselves a kangaroo - and I mean with a camera, not a gun! If you haven't got at least one picture squatting down on some grass and dangling a child within inches of those large pointed ears, then your relatives just won't believe you're here! So for all those heading over to Perth for a little look round, or those who have just moved here, here's why kangaroos are the best way to keep you from killing your kids in the car, and a list (and some links) for some really great places to get some up, close and personal action with a Skippy or two. Anyone else on here know of any other good Roo spotting spots that they can add to the list? Rachel :spinny:
  14. Hi all As you may/may not know, here in *sunny England* it's summer holidays time once again. That means... I'm kinda bored, many have gone away and left me at home a lot with nothing to do, so I thought why not do something with my time and get other people involved using something I'm good at? Website design! Yes, so I thought why not make a website about something I love... from somewhere I love... so Australia's wildlife? But - there's a catch! I want YOUR help filling it up! Basically, I'm designing it and getting it all laid up nicely, and then when it's ready, I'll publish it online. Once the basic site is online (there's gonna be a forum as well and stuff) I'll post the address on here... And then what I want people (anyone and everyone!!) to do is contribute!! It's a big collaborative website about Australia's wildlife! Got that? I want YOUR photos, stories of your encounters and what you love and hate most about Australia's wildlife. There'll be an email address on the website for you to post them all to. As I said, anyone can contribute anything from photos to drawings, stories, poems and they'll all get pieced together somehow in the website to create one big online unique picture of Australia's wildlife! Whether it's a story about that wasp that stung you this morning, a photo of a fluffy kookaburra sat on your fence, a drawing you think should be out there of a cuddly koala, I'll make sure they get credited to you and made available for all to see on the site! It's going to be called The Great Aus-e-outback (see, bit of a twist there like... electronic-outback?) ...and it'll be online within the next week-10 days! Who's up for it?! :jiggy:
  15. Guest

    Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary!!!

    What can I say?!! This family attraction is ALWAYS a big hit. Get up and close with some Aussie native animals.. loads to see! Kids love it! We visited 3 times in 6 months..lol.. but last visit was to work, as it was a location shoot for us. Get discount entry coupons for Currumbin and tons other stuff at: Discount Vouchers Australia - Discount Coupons - Why Pay Full Price
  16. I am not freaking out about the wildlife in Australia. I am quite level headed about it. BUT I am aware that Australians are familiar with their wildlife and I and my family are not. I have heard that children learn wildlife safety (and I think, something about what to do in emergency) at school. My son is 11 now, will be at least 12 by the time we get over there, so he won't have had that teaching. So I would like to make sure that he knows as much as his peers. For instance I know that here in UK he still quite enjoys catching spiders and bugs. I guess that most of what they are taught it along the lines of "don't touch" etc, but can you help me with some other specific info please?
  17. Kangaroo on the bed! Australian man wrestles kangaroo intruder - Telegraph
  18. The Pom Queen

    Wildlife Victoria

    Hi Guys I know I have called out for help before, but please remember the wildlife that has been affected by the fires. We are currently awaiting permission from the DSE and CFA to go in to the fire zone and we are going to need all the help we can get. We currently have 3 triage areas set up that has seen up to 100 animals and this is before we even get out on the fire front. Unfortunately, some of these animals didn't make it:cry: If you feel you could help in anyway at all please look at the following links or email me direct. 1. Emergency Response Fire Volunteers – Please register at: http://www.wildlifevictoria.org.au/cms/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=43&Itemid=77 2. Supplies Donations– Please click on this link for drop of points: http://www.wildlifevictoria.org.au/cms/images/stories/Flyer%20on%20supply%20drop%20off%20points.pdf 3. Other Non-medical supplies Donations – Please go to: http://www.wildlifevictoria.org.au/cms/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=43&Itemid=77 4. Money Donations – Please Click on: http://www.wildlifevictoria.org.au/ For detailed information regarding the above, please see: http://www.wildlifevictoria.org.au/cms/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=57:erv&catid=9:volunteer&Itemid=12 On another note, PLEASE DO NOT CALL our 24-hour Wildlife Emergency Line 13 ‘000’ WILDLIFE (13 0009 4535) for any of the above. This is an emergency line and should ONLY be used to report INJURED or ORPHANED wildlife. I thought you may like to see some of the koalas that have come in to our carers hands over the last week. As you all probably know Koala is aboriginal for "No Drink" this is a common myth that Koalas do not drink. They do get most of the water from the gum leaf but when it is hot they can drink lots, here are some photos of rescued koalas drinking and cooling down. I will add more to my album as I get them in.
  19. Guest

    Help the wildlife

    Please help the wildlife and RSPCA,they get no Government assistance. I don,t write much as I hate the rotton country. Its run by idiots and its all greed, We got through 2 wars and people helped each other,not all this greedI have been here 50 years and always worked,we would never have gone on the dole. God help Australia,do we have a Churchill hidden among us,no just sun damaged idiots and arsonists:arghh:
  20. The Pom Queen

    Wildlife Victoria Call for Help

    After a breakout of severe fires this week, wildlife rescue operations are already underway, with dozens of animals currently being treated and in care. To ensure we will be able to meet the substantial rescue and rehabilitation costs necessary to save animals' lives, We have immediately launched an urgent Bushfire Appeal . I encourage all Wildlife Victoria's friends and supporters to help spread the word about this urgent campaign. More details are contained in the report following my email below, written yesterday morning. Since then, Wildlife Victoria has been given the 'all clear' for clean up and rescue operations to begin in Woodend. This Australia Day long weekend, Wildlife Victoria volunteers are going into to these devastated areas to rescue koalas, wombats and any other injured animals they find, and make food drops for the animals they don't find. I just received a few minutes ago a volunteer's report of one of the first animals rescued from Woodend. 'While on the fire grounds the crew came across a burnt Eastern Grey Joey who was so severely injured that the crew leader was able to walk right up to her without resistance, cover her with a blanket and lay her down on the ground for immediate treatment before rushing her to triage.' In early December, I launched Wildlife Victoria's Summer Emergency Appeal with the aim of raising $24,000 to meet the costs of the large number of additional rescues and the increased number of calls we receive to the 24 hour Emergency Phone line, as well as to ensure we were as best prepared as we could be for the fires we hoped would not come. With the cool start to summer, donations have been slow to come in and I have only managed to raise $15,317 so far. This means Wildlife Victoria's resources are already stretched to the limit, with current weather patterns predicting another 3 - 4 weeks at least of extreme fire danger in Gippsland and many other areas, more fires are almost a certainty. As the cost of intensive care for just one koala can be over $60 per day (including burns creams, dressings, IV fluids, food, antibiotics and general care) , I need to spread the word about this Urgent Appeal far and fast: Donations can be made online here, by post to 3/288 Brunswick St, Fitzroy 3065, by phone to 03 9445 0310 (10 till 4pm) or 042 4044 930 (24 hours). Email inquiries steve@wildlifevictoria.org.au
  21. ErmintrudeMcMoo

    Aussie Wildlife

    Following on from a post by Tyke, I have to say the wildlife here in Oz is fantastic and so diverse, within a 15 minute radius of my house I have seen, dolphins, Osprey,spoonbills , pelicans ibis, sea lions, loads of different lizards and parrots. Relatives live on acreage and have kangaroos, black cockatoos and echidnas, plus last year we had whales at the local beach- it never fails to make me smile when I come across something new .
  22. Hi everyone, only 5 weeks to go now before we arrive in Brisbane. Our little schi tzu and our 2 cats are coming with us but we are concerned about the wildlife. As we know, cats are curious and wouldn't think twice about 'playing' with a snake! And our dog loves eating any spiders in the house. God help her if she eats a redback! 'Has anyone encountered this problem and how often do you actually see these snakes and spiders? Gaynor, Don and Louis. (10)
  23. Guest

    Currumbin -V- Australia Zoo

    The kids want to go to the zoo and its a toss up between Australia Zoo and Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary. I'm hearing good things about both. Has anyone been to both and what was your verdict?
  24. TheBrammies

    Learn About Australian Wildlife

    heres a link to australian musuem online good resourse for ozzie wildlife http://www.amonline.net.au/explore/index.
  25. natasha2106

    Wildlife in Oz

    Hi, we are thinking of moving out to oz, not sure where yet! I am petrified of snakes......to the point that I can't look at a picture of them without cra**ing myself. We have two young daughters, aged 7 and 4 and am quite concerned about the wildlife out in oz. We don't really need to worry when they play outside in their garden in uk, but what precautionary measures do you need in your garden in oz. What are the chances of a snake come sliding through your garden and biting a child?? Am I just being overly paranoid!!! Or is it quite common in oz???? I have just seen the picture of the snake and the wallabe and can't stop thinking if that could happen to one of my girls.....sorry if I sound ott, but really want to get the full picture of life in oz before committing to anything. thanks tasha
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