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Found 23 results

  1. If you're moving to Australia and haven't decided where to want to live yet, it may be worthwhile keeping an eye on CommSec's 'State of the States' reports. The quarterly report attempts to find out how Australia’s states and territories are performing by analysing eight key indicators: economic growth retail spending equipment investment unemployment construction work done population growth housing finance dwelling commencements. Just as the Reserve Bank uses long-term averages to determine the level of “normal” interest rates; CommSec do the same with the economic indicators. For each state and territory, latest readings for the key indicators were compared with decade averages – that is, against the “normal” performance. The latest State of the States report also includes a section comparing annual growth rates for the eight key indicators across the states and territories as well as Australia as a whole. This enables another point of comparison – in terms of economic momentum. FIRST - Victoria SECOND - NSW THIRD - Australian Capital Territory FOURTH - Tasmania FIFTH - Queensland SIXTH - South Australia SEVENTH - Northern Territory EIGHTH - Western Australia Victoria is now at the top of the economic performance rankings (For the first time since Commsec introduced the 'State of the States' economic performance rankings). Victoria ranks first on economic growth, dwelling starts and construction work done. NSW is second on the overall economic performance rankings but still holds top spot for retail spending and the relative performance on unemployment. The ACT has held on to third spot on the rankings. The ACT is top-ranked on relative housing finance and equipment spending and second-ranked on population growth and unemployment. Tasmania has held on to fourth position on the economic performance rankings and it can be broadly grouped with the ACT. Tasmania is ranked first on the relative position on population growth, a position that is driving strength in home building. Queensland is now in fifth position on the performance rankings ahead of South Australia but there is little to separate the two economies. Queensland ranks fourth on two indicators and fifth on four indicators South Australiais now in sixth position. But unemployment is the lowest in 5½ years in trend terms. The Northern Territory retains its seventh position on the economic performance rankings and can be broadly grouped with Western Australia. Both are facing challenges with the transition of resource projects moving from the production to the export phase. The Northern Territory is third-ranked on construction work done and economic growth. But it lags all other states and territories on four of the indicators. The good news is that employment is growing again in annual terms. Western Australia is seventh on three indicators and lags other economies on three indicators. But equipment spending is now the highest in just over three years.
  2. If you're moving to Australia and haven't decided where to want to live yet, it may be worthwhile keeping an eye on CommSec's 'State of the States' reports. The quarterly report attempts to find out how Australia’s states and territories performing by analysing eight key indicators: economic growth retail spending equipment investment unemployment construction work done population growth housing finance dwelling commencements. Just as the Reserve Bank uses long-term averages to determine the level of “normal” interest rates; CommSec do the same with the economic indicators. For each state and territory, latest readings for the key indicators were compared with decade averages – that is, against the “normal” performance. The latest State of the States report also includes a section comparing annual growth rates for the eight key indicators across the states and territories as well as Australia as a whole. This enables another point of comparison – in terms of economic momentum. FIRST - New South Wales SECOND - Victoria THIRD - Australian Capital Territory FOURTH - Tasmania FIFTH - South Australia SIXTH - Queensland SEVENTH - Northern Territory EIGHTH - Western Australia NSW has secured top rankings on five of the eight economic indicators: retail trade, dwelling starts, equipment investment, construction work and unemployment. NSW is second on economic growth and in third spot on population growth and housing finance. Victoria is second on the economic performance rankings for five of the eight indicators: retail trade, housing finance, population growth, construction work done and equipment investment. The lowest ranking is fifth on the unemployment rate. The ACT held on to third spot on the rankings. The biggest improvement has been the job market, with annual employment growth now the strongest in almost a decade. The ACT is top-ranked on housing finance. Tasmania has lifted from fifth to fourth position. Tasmania now is top-ranked on relative population growth and is third-placed on equipment investment and unemployment. Population growth is the strongest in 6½ years. South Australia has eased from fourth to fifth on the performance rankings. South Australia is ranked fourth on four of the eight indicators. Queensland remains in sixth position. But the outlook is promising with annual employment growth the fastest in the nation and just off the fastest for the state in over a decade. The Northern Territory retains its seventh position on the economic performance rankings. The Territory is top ranked on economic growth but now lags all other economies on six of the eight indicators. Employment is now lower than a year ago in trend terms. The good news is that exports are growing strongly, up 35 per cent on a year ago. The economic performance of Western Australia continues to reflect the ending of the mining construction boom. But employment growth was just off the strongest levels seen in five years. And annual population growth has lifted for the past four quarters. Download the full report: CommSec_State_of_the_States_January2018.pdf
  3. If you're moving to Australia and haven't decided where to want to live yet, it may be worthwhile keeping an eye on CommSec's 'State of the States' reports. The quarterly report attempts to find out how Australia’s states and territories performing by analysing eight key indicators: economic growth retail spending equipment investment unemployment construction work done population growth housing finance dwelling commencements. Just as the Reserve Bank uses long-term averages to determine the level of “normal” interest rates; CommSec do the same with the economic indicators. For each state and territory, latest readings for the key indicators were compared with decade averages – that is, against the “normal” performance. The latest State of the States report also includes a section comparing annual growth rates for the eight key indicators across the states and territories as well as Australia as a whole. This enables another point of comparison – in terms of economic momentum. FIRST - New South Wales SECOND - Victoria THIRD - Australian Capital Territory FOURTH - South Australia FIFTH - Tasmania SIXTH - Queensland SEVENTH - Northern Territory EIGHTH - Western Australia Download the full report: CommSec_State_of_the_States_October2017.pdf
  4. Hi, I am a newly-arrived migrant from the Philippines. I am currently a permanent resident here for three months. I already had my education assessed and it was equivalent to that of an Australian Bachelor's Degree. I'm an IT graduate and I have had already two years work experience from my home country. I'm not very picky when looking for jobs, except that I will not do the extremely physical jobs or mechanical jobs. I have tried applying for fast food chains, cleaner jobs, data entry, even for those "no experience" jobs..you name it. I haven't gotten any interview at all and I applied for more than a hundred jobs, including my walk-in applications. I tried applying for my field too which is IT, but I didn't get any luck. All I wanted is to just get a small job for the meantime so that I can settle, but I am having problems. I don't know what I'm doing wrong, but a consultant looked up to my resume and said it was good.
  5. Hi. My son in law and family are in Oz on the perm 176 state sponsored visa. He has lost his job and is struggling to find work as a rooftiler/slater (his profession for TRA etc). I just wondered if he has to work as part of his visa obligations and if he does HAVE to work must it be rooftiling/slating or any job on the thingy list or can he get any work as long as he is employed. Thanks in advance Pez.
  6. Clarius Skills Index 3rd Quarter June: Demand was highest for senior roles in engineering, corporate services, information technology, sales and marketing. The most in demand workers were engineers with a 8,564 shortage. The shortage for accountants also doubled from a 1,500 shortfall in the March quarter to 3,800 in June.
  7. Theres been a huge 80,000 rise in unemployment in the UK and Nick Clegg is on the tv saying things are going to get a lot worse, the unions are balloting for strike action and its looking like a winter of discontent, just where will it all end? Unemployment Increases By 80,000 To Hits 2.51… Unemployment rose by 80,000 in the three months to July to 2.51 million, official figures revealed.
  8. The Pom Queen

    Unemployment Rate

    Australia's unemployment rate fell to 5.2 per cent in September from an unrevised 5.3 per cent in August. Economists had expected the jobless rate to stay at 5.3 per cent and media were speculating that the Reserve Bank would cut interests rates as soon as Melbourne Cup Day on the first Tuesday in November. Instead, 20,400 jobs were added to the economy in September taking the total number of employed to 11.451 million. Of the jobs added, 10,800 were full time taking that tally to 8.044 million in September while part-time employment was up 9,600 to 3.407 million. The September participation rate was as forecast at 65.6 per cent unchanged from August. The ABS reported aggregate hours worked by employed people in Australia fell by 0.6 per cent in September, seasonally adjusted. Hours rose in August by 0.3 per cent in August. Aggregate hours worked in September 2011 were 1.3 per cent higher than in September 2010, compared with a rise. South Australia recorded the highest jobless rate seeing unemployment climb by 4,800 in September where as Western Australia held the title in August. Meanwhile in other parts of the world the UK rate has shot to its highest level since 1994 reaching 8.1 per cent. Youth unemployment (16-years-old to 24-years-old) has hit 21.3 per cent. In the US the September unemployment rate remained at 9.1 per cent despite the creation of more than 100,000 jobs that month.
  9. The Pom Queen

    UK Unemployment at 17 year high

    NEARLY a million young people are now out of work — with the total number of unemployed at a 17-year high, shocking figures revealed yesterday. Taking youngsters not actively seeking work into account, it means HALF of all 16 to 24-year-olds do not have a job. But the elderly are being hit too, the number of over-65s in work has fallen by a record 74,000 over the past three months. The figures, from the Office for National Statistics, showed unemployment overall increased by 114,000 to 2.57 million in the three months to August. It is the worst total since 1994, when Sir John Major was PM. It gives a jobless rate of 8.1 per cent. But of particular concern is youth unemployment, which reached a record high of 991,000, up a staggering 74,000. It takes unemployment among the young to 21.3 per cent, the highest since comparable records began in 1992. The number of unemployed 16 to 17-year-olds rose 3,000 to 205,000. Overall, 867,000 people have been out of work for more than a year, including 227,000 aged 18 to 24. The number now claiming Jobseeker's Allowance increased by 17,500 to 1.6 million in September, the seventh monthly rise in a row.
  10. I read something on Perthnow.com and it said that unemployment rose and it may keep rising. Is this true? Im supposed to be heading over next month and this is not the news i want to be hearing.:frown:
  11. amibovered

    Unemployment up again

    http://www.straitstimes.com/BreakingNews/Money/Story/STIStory_710700.html :sad: I have no confidence in this government to turn this around, haven't got a great deal of confidence in the other lot either.
  12. Found this quite interesting. UK has 7.7% of the population unemployed while Oz is only 5.1% France is a surprising 9.7%, but look at some of the less developed Countries below.:eek: http://www.tradingeconomics.com/unemployment-rates-list-by-country
  13. Some good news http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-13773692
  14. Guest

    Australia Unemployment

    5% is often touted as the unemployment rate in Australia. This document looks at it from another angle. I'm not sure I understand it myself and it doesn't really concern me so I wont be bothering trying to analyise it but it may make be usefull to someone :wubclub: Here to help http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/14/38/45603025.pdf
  15. Guest

    Unemployment

    Can anyone tell me why many people seem to think the UK is in doom and gloom at the moment and there are no jobs around etc and that conversely Australias economy is booming? Ive read this week that the UK unemployment rate is 2.5 million around 4% ish. On the other hand Australia has an unemployment rate of 5%. If it wasnt for this mining boom keeping tradesmen busy it would be even higher.
  16. News item from the BBC. Good news for Aussie. BBC News - Australian employment rises sharply
  17. Full-time jobs surge as unemployment rate creeps higher, ABS says | The Australian
  18. A new report shows the economic downturn has forced hundreds of thousands of Australians out of full-time employment and into casual work. The report, released exclusively to ABC's Lateline program, comes despite conventional wisdom that in the financial crisis employers have not sacked workers en masse, but merely cut their hours. Bit more honesty from ABC versus print media who are harbingers of only good economic news, and encouraging people to buy or upgrade properties.....
  19. connaust

    Hidden Unemployment

    Hidden Unemployment - The official unemployment rate just released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) for September was 5.7 per cent. It was viewed by those in the government with great optimism of how Australia is resisting the Global Financial Crisis (GFC), however, is that unemployment rate a true indication of the level of unemployment, or indeed an accurate reflection on the actual state of the labour market in Australia? No it is not not....according to comments with this article online
  20. hello there, My name is Rj and am from india. i was working in a cafe while studying my uni in australia, fell in love with an aussie girl. married and been here for 2yrs. i am a graphic designer student, but couln't get any job. my wife now works as a steward in a cafe brings bacon home. i am so broke and we live in poverty. i am from a rich family back home in india but din wanna ask money from them. now that winter there is not even a dish washing job. am in ballina, north coast, NSW. if this situation exist i am planning to take my wife to India where there is no need to be in poverty if you are a graphic designer. its very depressing for the moment. any one can suggest any new trick. i even have rsa and rcg for bar tender and gambling but no job. i still cant believe poverty exist so bad in australia, which is very disapointing. Rj
  21. Sunshine State beats NSW as sickest QUEENSLAND has replaced the usual suspect of NSW as the nation’s sickest state and threatens to drag Australia into a prolonged recession. Queensland has by far the worst budget position of all the states, and its citizens face the sharpest fall in living standards as unemployment is forecast to almost double in the next two years, from 4.25per cent to 7.25 per cent.
  22. I was hoping someone could help me with this medical/employment history question. I am applying for a 175 visa. I pass the points test with 120 points and in the last 4 years have about 1 year and 8 months experience in my field. My question is a little complicated. If I tick the "depression" question on my medical and admit to having taken anti-depressents, will DIMIA then look at my employment history and pay particular attention to periods of unemployment and count that against me. i.e will they try and link the periods of unemployment with my depression and say I might become subsequently unemployed in australia on account of my depression and thus a burden on tax payers. I pass the recent experience criteria (12 months employment in my profession in the last 24 months). However, I stopped working two months before submitting my application and haven't been employed since then. I also have some short (<6month periods) of unemployment since graduating my bachelors and masters degrees.
  23. . THE jobless rate rose to 4.8 per cent in January as more people looked for work in a shrinking market, rather than massive lay-offs. Figures released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics today show the unemployment rate surged to the highest level since June 2006 even though the number of people in the workforce increased by 1200. Economists had expected the jobless rate to reach 4.7 per cent, with the loss of 18,000 jobs. ICAP senior economist Adam Carr said the higher unemployment rate reflected an imbalance in the number of people looking for work and the number of job vacancies. "The reality is that the unemployment rate is higher because the participation rate rose and that means there are more people looking for jobs and there are less jobs available, but there isn’t this massive job destruction that some pessimists are arguing," said Mr Carr. Full Story At: Unemployment rises to 4.8pc as more people seek work | The Australian
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