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Found 19 results

  1. The Pom Queen

    Australia Tourism Videos

    Just wondered what you thought of the new Tourism video and some of the older ones they have run [video=youtube_share;m5__vyZMdlg]
  2. The Pom Queen

    Queensland - Who Visits on Holiday

    The latest study on tourists who visit Queensland shows that Indians are the highest spenders. India: DINKs (Double Income No Kids) on a self-drive market with the "brag factor" of visiting key sights and staying in five-star hotels. They are the highest spenders - on average $7900 per person during a 10-day trip - for flights and accommodation. Middle East: High-spending Arabs go to the Gold Coast as temperatures hit the 50C mark back home between July and September. Ramadan rooms with Arabic food and coffee are offered in hotels as they spend, on average, $7500, not including luxury goods shopping. Indonesia: The new middle class are one of southeast Queensland's best markets after stable political and economic growth, with up to 21,000 (17 per cent) more visitors. Their spending has gone up from $17m to $40m, with a huge staff incentive market out of the Indonesian winners of the Million Dollar Memo. Queensland's total international visitor market is down 7 per cent to 1.9 million, with 40 million hotel nights on an average stay of 21 nights.
  3. UK media recently reported that the British government is planning a 'major crackdown' on 'health tourism'. The logic of the crackdown appeared to be straight forward, given that the NHS is placed under considerable strain from visitors who arrive in the UK with longstanding health problems expecting free treatment. However, the restrictions will also affect British expats living abroad. According to media reports, UK pensioners who have been residing abroad for more than six months will no longer be eligible for free treatment. Regardless of contributions made in the form of tax payment and National Insurance contributions, they will have to pay for any NHS treatment received while in Britain. The only exceptions, where the costs will still be covered by the NHS, is for the treatment of emergencies, such as heart attacks. However, the ban, which is set to be enforced by next April has sparked considerable controversy from UK citizens residing abroad. "I lived and worked in the UK for 20 years. I paid the soaring tax rates each and every year, and I never went on the dole [the British welfare system] or tried to qualify for any extras," said expat, Laura, who began working abroad seven months ago. She added, "There isn't any work in the UK now. The unemployment rate is soaring, and higher education is about to skyrocket as university fees are going up. Do they really expect Britons to stay put, paying out in tax but getting so little in return? I don't intend to return to the UK, but that doesn't mean I don't deserve the rights of other citizens should I visit later. This is especially the case when I'm old and at my most vulnerable. In fact, I deserve more as I never milked the system like the others did."
  4. The Pom Queen

    High Demand for Australian Tourism Visas

    According to figures from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) released on October 6, demand for Australian tourist visas is riding high despite the global economic downturn due to a growing interest from Asia. The ABS report showed that the number of overall short-term visitors to the country increases by 3.4% in August 2011, compared with August 2010. The Australian Government pronounced the figures as encouraging considering the global economic downturn and show that the increase in demand for Australian tourist visas is mostly accounted for by the Asian market. "The tourism industry is expanding beyond traditional markets to include new ones in Asia, which continue to grow strongly," said Tourism Minister Martin Ferguson in a joint statement with the Minister Assisting on Tourism Nick Sherry. He also stated that the figures bring optimism about the tourism industry's future, which is considered to be not looking so bright because of recent reform to Australia's immigration regulations. The figures are a further reminder about the potential tourists from Asia, including China and Australia's neighbours in South-East Asia such as Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore. The report indicates that Indonesian visitors applying for Australian visa doubled, arrivals from Malaysia were up by 34%, and arrivals from China rose by 21%. Meanwhile, the number of Europeans wishing to come to Australia is down by 3.9% and arrivals from the United States and Canada decreased by 4.4% and 5.0% respectively. The ministerial statement said this decrease in demand can be attributed to the "weak economic conditions" currently being suffered in these traditional markets. Senator Sherry - who is Minister for Small Business in the current Government - also said the expected continuing rise of Asian demand for travel to Australia will have implications for the tourism industry in terms of employment. He said "By 2015, our tourism industry may need as many as 56,000 extra workers, making the labour market even tighter," and stated that offering employees career-development paths was one of the best ways for employers to hold onto existing staff and attract recruits. "The Labour and Skills Working Group add value to that task," added he.
  5. Tourism Australia is running an online campaign at the moment, promoting locations around Australia in short online videos, featuring, backpackers, tour guides etc to lure more young people Down Under to work and play. The Tourism Australia campaign, 30 days in Oz, consists of 30 online videos, each following someone different in locations around Australia, with each demonstrating in 60 seconds why "there's nothing like Australia for young travellers." Tourism Australia managing director Andrew McEvoy said the campaign would promote the Working Holiday Visa and encourage young people to consider Australia as a place to work or travel, particularly those leaving school or on a Gap Year. "One of Tourism Australia's objectives is to get more young people to holiday in Australia. These travellers often become lifelong advocates, influencing friends and family of all ages to holiday in Australia and returning themselves later in life," he said. "We also know from research that many of these visitors are backpackers, who spend more time travelling and explore more of Australia than other travellers, which is one of the reasons the youth market is such an important one for us." The video's showcasing Victoria are below: F6DExzY9GI0 vrv1GTMzzwM Je5QAF0wrg8 Gkz7O_cXvNM XzzMdOCxnxY
  6. Tourism Australia is running an online campaign at the moment, promoting locations around Australia in short online videos, featuring, backpackers, tour guides etc to lure more young people Down Under to work and play. The Tourism Australia campaign, 30 days in Oz, consists of 30 online videos, each following someone different in locations around Australia, with each demonstrating in 60 seconds why "there's nothing like Australia for young travellers." Tourism Australia managing director Andrew McEvoy said the campaign would promote the Working Holiday Visa and encourage young people to consider Australia as a place to work or travel, particularly those leaving school or on a Gap Year. "One of Tourism Australia's objectives is to get more young people to holiday in Australia. These travellers often become lifelong advocates, influencing friends and family of all ages to holiday in Australia and returning themselves later in life," he said. "We also know from research that many of these visitors are backpackers, who spend more time travelling and explore more of Australia than other travellers, which is one of the reasons the youth market is such an important one for us." The video's showcasing Tasmania are below: ni44QcpnZkg 3lvEdwb15GA sWMG2vNKr-w
  7. Tourism Australia is running an online campaign at the moment, promoting locations around Australia in short online videos, featuring, backpackers, tour guides etc to lure more young people Down Under to work and play. The Tourism Australia campaign, 30 days in Oz, consists of 30 online videos, each following someone different in locations around Australia, with each demonstrating in 60 seconds why "there's nothing like Australia for young travellers." Tourism Australia managing director Andrew McEvoy said the campaign would promote the Working Holiday Visa and encourage young people to consider Australia as a place to work or travel, particularly those leaving school or on a Gap Year. "One of Tourism Australia's objectives is to get more young people to holiday in Australia. These travellers often become lifelong advocates, influencing friends and family of all ages to holiday in Australia and returning themselves later in life," he said. "We also know from research that many of these visitors are backpackers, who spend more time travelling and explore more of Australia than other travellers, which is one of the reasons the youth market is such an important one for us." The video's showcasing New South Wales are below: 76oo7RQcruI 8tJfsMgFH9s bKNLrnJjdA4 Feh0l5aBH2U nOOyd_CHoVo 567Dp8qrmzs
  8. Tourism Australia is running an online campaign at the moment, promoting locations around Australia in short online videos, featuring, backpackers, tour guides etc to lure more young people Down Under to work and play. The Tourism Australia campaign, 30 days in Oz, consists of 30 online videos, each following someone different in locations around Australia, with each demonstrating in 60 seconds why "there's nothing like Australia for young travellers." Tourism Australia managing director Andrew McEvoy said the campaign would promote the Working Holiday Visa and encourage young people to consider Australia as a place to work or travel, particularly those leaving school or on a Gap Year. "One of Tourism Australia's objectives is to get more young people to holiday in Australia. These travellers often become lifelong advocates, influencing friends and family of all ages to holiday in Australia and returning themselves later in life," he said. "We also know from research that many of these visitors are backpackers, who spend more time travelling and explore more of Australia than other travellers, which is one of the reasons the youth market is such an important one for us." The video's showcasing the Northern Territory are below: Xa9XBQX3pFQ sxEBpPPlT3U _BuPPubRRBU sa12nAC7lEg
  9. Tourism Australia is running an online campaign at the moment, promoting locations around Australia in short online videos, featuring, backpackers, tour guides etc to lure more young people Down Under to work and play. The Tourism Australia campaign, 30 days in Oz, consists of 30 online videos, each following someone different in locations around Australia, with each demonstrating in 60 seconds why "there's nothing like Australia for young travellers." Tourism Australia managing director Andrew McEvoy said the campaign would promote the Working Holiday Visa and encourage young people to consider Australia as a place to work or travel, particularly those leaving school or on a Gap Year. "One of Tourism Australia's objectives is to get more young people to holiday in Australia. These travellers often become lifelong advocates, influencing friends and family of all ages to holiday in Australia and returning themselves later in life," he said. "We also know from research that many of these visitors are backpackers, who spend more time travelling and explore more of Australia than other travellers, which is one of the reasons the youth market is such an important one for us." The video's showcasing our great state are below: vTSSwWl2ApY fbr1Nm_a60U LDdxZg2djRA QzEXsq7N11k QXKzISyR5Ow Wk_H1qe-Afc
  10. Tourism Australia is running an online campaign at the moment, promoting locations around Australia in short online videos, featuring, backpackers, tour guides etc to lure more young people Down Under to work and play. The Tourism Australia campaign, 30 days in Oz, consists of 30 online videos, each following someone different in locations around Australia, with each demonstrating in 60 seconds why "there's nothing like Australia for young travellers." Tourism Australia managing director Andrew McEvoy said the campaign would promote the Working Holiday Visa and encourage young people to consider Australia as a place to work or travel, particularly those leaving school or on a Gap Year. "One of Tourism Australia's objectives is to get more young people to holiday in Australia. These travellers often become lifelong advocates, influencing friends and family of all ages to holiday in Australia and returning themselves later in life," he said. "We also know from research that many of these visitors are backpackers, who spend more time travelling and explore more of Australia than other travellers, which is one of the reasons the youth market is such an important one for us." The video's showcasing South Australia are below: 7MIvCyNUfX0 2BKHDeqZ07Y cy4OpklYrYc dIg3br2HN0E
  11. Tourism Australia is running an online campaign at the moment, promoting locations around Australia in short online videos, featuring, backpackers, tour guides etc to lure more young people Down Under to work and play. The Tourism Australia campaign, 30 days in Oz, consists of 30 online videos, each following someone different in locations around Australia, with each demonstrating in 60 seconds why "there's nothing like Australia for young travellers." Tourism Australia managing director Andrew McEvoy said the campaign would promote the Working Holiday Visa and encourage young people to consider Australia as a place to work or travel, particularly those leaving school or on a Gap Year. "One of Tourism Australia's objectives is to get more young people to holiday in Australia. These travellers often become lifelong advocates, influencing friends and family of all ages to holiday in Australia and returning themselves later in life," he said. "We also know from research that many of these visitors are backpackers, who spend more time travelling and explore more of Australia than other travellers, which is one of the reasons the youth market is such an important one for us." The video's showcasing Western Australia are below: cdNhEvyT5qU LML5LVe9ogc lhRn9tZ1M3M
  12. Guest

    Medical Tourism

    ....................just wondered .........................with the talk of the cost /or not of medical and dentistry proceedures.....................what are your views on medical tourism................................just to clarify.................Traditionally medical tourism has been associated with elective procedures ................... such as cosmetic dental and plastic surgery.........................however, non-elective procedures such as knee and hip replacements, cardiac procedures and neurosurgery have rapidly been gaining ground and are soon expected to overtake seemingly “trivial” pursuits such as searching for the perfect smile.......................................Asian nations such as India, Thailand and Singapore have taken the lead in marketing their hospitals and countries to this new wave of medical tourists,................................................................ most of whom are baby boomers hailing from countries in North America, Europe , the Middle East and now Australia..................................................... Not to be left behind, other countries in Asia, Latin America, and Europe are now catching up and have begun to successfully attract many of these same markets with enticing offers of cheaper prices, shorter flights and cutting edge technology. ..............................So now many are putting together...........................a holiday package to include some sort of proceedure..........................just wondered what others views on this growing trend are.............................
  13. I wonder if anyone can help from their knowledge / experience with Bridging Visa Type B. I am planning to go to the States for a holiday and visiting a friend during the upcoming easter break. I applied for GSM 885 visa on Aug-2010, and currently on Bridging Visa A, obviously. My questions: 1) Is tourism/visiting a friend a valid/substantial reason for applying a bridging visa b, or is that too brutally honest? Because I really want a holiday.... I have a full time job, have enough savings to go, and have enough annual leaves saved up.. Thats about the reason I want to travel OUTSIDE australia. Otherwise what do you suggest I should put as reason? 2) When is generally the best time to apply? Obviously I want to secure my plane ticket ASAP so I can get the best fare available. So for me personally the sooner I can get the BVB the better. Can anyone suggest with DIAC is it better to apply BVB closer to the date of intended departure or way ahead before? Appreciate your response and thanks in advance. Cheers:notworthy:
  14. The holiday is over. Tourism in Australia is flagging but the industry has grand plans for a revival, writes Clive Dorman. Australian tourism has hit rock-bottom. Like an addict looking for a road to recovery, the industry finally conceded last week there is a problem. The State of the Industry report by the federal government's Tourism Research Australia agency, which was presented at the industry's first Tourism Directions conference in Canberra on November 15, laid out the stark reality that tourism ran into a brick wall a decade ago. That was roughly when Australia ceased to be the world's ''flavour of the month'', even though consumers around the globe still rate Australia among the top few places they would like to see. See comments from Australians here. Indian students ditching Australian education plans. AUSTRALIA'S multi-billion-dollar Indian student market has collapsed in just 12 months. This is because new students are turning their backs on the once-prized Australian education sector in favour of Canada, New Zealand and Britain. Enrolments from the Indian student market -- which until last year was showing annual growth rates of up to 40 per cent and was worth almost $3 billion a year to the Australian economy -- have been dropping since March. By September, commencements were down almost 50 per cent on last year, due to the combined effect of onerous new financial requirements, last year's street attacks on Indian students, vocational school closures and the rising Australian dollar.
  15. connaust

    New Tourism Australia Campaign

    Australian Tourism Campaign “Nothing Like Australia”. The backpacking industry has been encouraged to leverage Tourism Australia’s ‘There’s nothing like Australia’ marketing campaign after managing director Andrew McEvoy unveiled the new strategy in Sydney this morning. Every entry posted on the website nothinglikeaustralia.com will be tagged and geo-located, building an experiential map of Australia for would-be visitors. The results will also provide content for the advertising campaign to follow.
  16. calNgary

    New Qld Tourism Ads

    Queensland have just released 4 new ads to boost tourism, i personally don't think they are too bad but the media have slated them . ''TOURISM Queensland's new TV ad campaign has been labelled "embarrassing" and an "abomination" by Australians. The $5 million tourism ad featuring music by The Monkees caused Aussies to question whether Premier Anna Bligh has "lost her bananas". The four TV advertisements feature reworked lyrics to The Monkees' tune "Hey, hey we're The Monkees" to become "Hey, hey this is Queensland". The music is accompanied by "Best Job in the World" candidates enjoying themselves at various locations. You can watch them here,,, Hey hey, it's a new tourism ad- Local Cairns News | cairns.com.au What do you guys think??????? Cal x
  17. :arghh:Can anyone advise me if a Vocational Teacher of tourism would be classed as trade or nontrade as there are two categories on the Skills list and this makes a difference to whom assess the application? You can take NVQ's on the job but also study the subject in college so I am not sure if it is just classed as industry or trade? Help?
  18. Hi all (Brand new Member), in need of lots of advice, I have been teaching tourism in the UK since 1999 and came directly from industry so at that point had no formal teaching qualifications. I have now obtained a Certificate in Education and finish my BA hons in education in May. I would like to carry on teaching in NSW if possible but am unsure how colleges recruit does anyone have any guidance. I am assuming that I can apply for a skills visa due to my professional status although I do not have QTS as I do not have a PGCE having never taught in schools. Alternatively I could look into training in tourism which I did before or working back in the industry, but I really love teaching and wish to continue. Am I likely to be able to secure a job in this field with the qualifications I already have? Can anyone shed any light on the opportunities that may be available to me. I am hoping to make the move at the end of this year with my daughter who is 8yrs old. Look forward to hearing from anyone who can give any advice at all. Thanks so much Deborah
  19. Just wondering if anyone has started a business in tourism here and if so how has it gone and have things slackened off with the global financial crisis? Cara
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