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      Found 2 results

      1. As expected, the federal govt used yesterday's budget to outline its plans to abolish the 457 visa and replace the scheme with short and medium-term streams. Application fees for the short-term, two year visas will increase by $90 to $1150, while four-year visa applications will cost $2400 apiece. In addition to this, companies will also be charged annual foreign worker levies. Under the existing scheme, employers have contributed one of two per cent of their payroll to training if they employed foreign workers. But as the requirements have proved almost impossible to police the govt is taking a different route. From March 2018, businesses that employ foreign workers on certain skilled visas will be required to pay money into a "Skilling Australians" fund. Companies turning over less than $10 million per year must make an upfront payment of $1200 (per visa, per year) for each employee on a temporary visa. They must also make a one-off payment of $3000 for each staffer sponsored for a permanent skilled worker visas. Businesses with turnovers above $10 million will be required to make up front payments of $1800 for each worker on temporary visas and $5000 one-off levies for those on permanent skilled visas. The levy is expected to rake in $1.2 billion over the next four years, which will be funnelled into a new Commonwealth-State skills fund. "States and territories will only be able to draw on this fund when they deliver on their commitments to train new apprentices," Mr Morrison said in his budget speech.
      2. By Robert Williams 03/05/2017 Email admin[at]pomsinoz.com India’s Prime Minister has voiced his reservations to the Australian PM about the Government’s recent decision to phase out and replace the 457 visa next year. India was perturbed by the Federal Govt’s announcement last month that the popular 457 visa would be stopped in 2018 and replaced and replaced with the completely new Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) visa which will assist businesses in addressing bona fide skill shortages. The TSS Visa is a four year visa is your occupation is on the Medium and Long term Strategic Skilled List (MLTSSL) or two years is your occupation isn't on the MLTSSL The Australian PM described the changes as being “in the national interest”. At present, Indian nationals make up a quarter of 457 visa holders - the most of any nationality. India had hinted the move to replace it could affect trade negotiations, which the two countries had only just pledged to revive during Mr Turnbull’s recent India visit in early April. Now, according to India’s Ministry of External Affairs, Mr Modi himself has “expressed concern” to Mr Turnbull about the possible impact of visa changes. In response to the announced Visa changes, India’s Ministry of External Affairs issued a terse statement, saying that it was “examining the consequences” of the new policy, adding that it would look at the matter “in the context” of trade negotiations. Elsewhere, Anisha Gupta, an Indian migration has suggested that Visa changes will damage Australia’s longer-term ability to attract both skilled workers and students with an eye to their futures. “I’m receiving a lot of calls from the applicants, as well as the people who have already applied for the visa — how will that affect them?” she said. (Current visa holders will not be affected by the changes, which will see the introduction of two new temporary skills visas — a two-year visa and a more specialised one for four years “targeted at higher skills”.) Ms Gupta warns changing the visa system will likely hurt Australian universities’ efforts to attract Indian students, especially those seeking degrees in the 200 professions the Government is removing from the list of those eligible for skilled worker visas. That would affect the students if they think their occupations are out of the list, so they might choose another country which has a more favourable immigration policy for them,” she said.