Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'nature'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Moving to Australia
    • Visa Chat
    • Skilled Visas
    • Family / Partner Visas
    • Temporary Visas
    • Business Skills Visas
    • Business Sponsored
    • Working Holiday Visas
    • Shipping and Removals
  • Life in Australia
    • Aussie Chat
    • Household
    • Renting & Real Estate
    • Money & Finance
    • Education
    • Health
    • Careers and Vacancies
    • Kids Down Under
    • Pets
    • Socialising Hobbies Clubs Sport
    • Travel
  • Australian States & Territories
    • ACT
    • New South Wales
    • Northern Territory
    • Queensland
    • South Australia
    • Tasmania
    • Victoria
    • Western Australia
  • Partner Forums
    • Money Transfer: Ask Moneycorp
    • Financial Advice: Ask Vista
    • Shipping Pets: Ask Pet Air
    • Talking Tax: Ask Alan
  • Moving to the UK
    • UK Chat
    • Education
    • Where to Live?
    • Money and Finance
  • PomsInOz Specific
    • Chewing the fat

    Categories

    • Migration
    • Living in Australia
    • Jobs and Careers
    • Moving to Australia Real Life Stories
    • Money and Finance
    • Transport
    • Where to live in Australia?
      • Victoria
      • Queensland
      • New South Wales
      • Tasmania
      • Western Australia
      • South Australia
    • Backpacking
    • News
    • Forum Help

    Blogs

    There are no results to display.

    There are no results to display.


    Find results in...

    Find results that contain...


    Date Created

    • Start

      End


    Last Updated

    • Start

      End


    Filter by number of...

    Joined

    • Start

      End


    Group


    Found 10 results

    1. Hi, This is a first post, so I apologise to any moderators if I transgress any forum rules (I have also posted this on the NT board). We are dual nationals who have been in Australia since 1999 and living in the Top End since 2002. We have a rural property on 23 acres of land about 40kms south of Darwin. The property was previously a mango orchard and we bought it with the express intention of revegetating and restoring the property, and after fifteen years of hard work we have made significant achievements. Due to external circumstances we have to move back to the UK. Although the house is on the market for sale we are also exploring the possibility of renting; however, this is a unique and very special piece of land and we are seeking potential 'tenants' who will both appreciate the flora and fauna and look after both the house and the land. Sadly, the average Australian renter (in the NT at least) does not have the best reputation. Living here we can guarantee you will have incredible experiences of unique plants and animals without having to travel to a tourist haunt. Creatures we share the land with include: agile wallabies, possums, bandicoots, hopping mice, over a hundred species of birds, frogs, native toads, different snake species including pythons over 3m long. And if you want you can spy on both fresh and salt water crocodiles. The house has two airconned bedrooms, a renovated kitchen, a large bathroom, laundry and verandahs; there is solar hot water, on grid solar and a solar bore, so utilities bills are minimal. We would be happy to leave some furniture as required. We would expect you to do some mowing when required, spray weeds when needed and manage and tidy the garden. You will also need to show some initiative as occasional problems arise. More than anything you will need to love, respect and appreciate nature. Rent is negotiable but we are looking to cover our costs and would be using a property agent as a local point of contact. Available from September onwards. We would prefer a 6 to 12 month commitment. This is a great opportunity for a couple looking for a new adventure. Darwin has lots of employment possibilities and is often seen as a good place to advance one's career. You can find out more about the property at landsale.treehugger.com.au and more about the flora and fauna at treehugger.com.au If you need any further information please send a PM.
    2. Hi, This is a first post, so I apologise to any moderators if I transgress any forum rules (I have also posted this on the NT board). We are dual nationals who have been in Australia since 1999 and living in the Top End since 2002. We have a rural property on 23 acres of land about 40kms south of Darwin. The property was previously a mango orchard and we bought it with the express intention of revegetating and restoring the property, and after fifteen years of hard work we have made significant achievements. Due to external circumstances we have to move back to the UK. Although the house is on the market for sale we are also exploring the possibility of renting; however, this is a unique and very special piece of land and we are seeking potential 'tenants' who will both appreciate the flora and fauna and look after both the house and the land. Sadly, the average Australian renter (in the NT at least) does not have the best reputation. Living here we can guarantee you will have incredible experiences of unique plants and animals without having to travel to a tourist haunt. Creatures we share the land with include: agile wallabies, possums, bandicoots, hopping mice, over a hundred species of birds, frogs, native toads, different snake species including pythons over 3m long. And if you want you can spy on both fresh and salt water crocodiles. The house has two airconned bedrooms, a renovated kitchen, a large bathroom, laundry and verandahs; there is solar hot water, on grid solar and a solar bore, so utilities bills are minimal. We would be happy to leave some furniture as required. We would expect you to do some mowing when required, spray weeds when needed and manage and tidy the garden. You will also need to show some initiative as occasional problems arise. More than anything you will need to love, respect and appreciate nature. Rent is negotiable but we are looking to cover our costs and would be using a property agent as a local point of contact. Available from September onwards. We would prefer a 6 to 12 month commitment. This is a great opportunity for a couple looking for a new adventure. Darwin has lots of employment possibilities and is often seen as a good place to advance one's career. You can find out more about the property at landsale.treehugger.com.au and more about the flora and fauna at treehugger.com.au If you need any further information please send a PM.
    3. ChristophJPlatt

      Working With Animals

      Hi Everyone, Moving out to Oz in November (for approximately 16 months, but could be more). I have some experience working with animals and am looking to see if what opportunities are out there for this. Being on a subclass 417 working visa, means it could only be for 6 months at a time. But, just hoping to see how available the field is and what sort of processes I may need to go through to get myself working with animals in Oz. Any advice or news of vacancies would be greatly appreciated and may hopefully help others in the same situation. I'll be staying in NSW (Syndey/Cronulla) initially but am very open to moving around. Hope to hear from all you conservationists out there. Chris
    4. Hey everyone! I'm heading to Australia for my first solo backpacking trip. There's a lot of information out there about backpacking Australia, but I wanted direct advice from people who have experienced Australia either by backpacking through the country or living there. Basically, my questions are: What are some free/cheap things to do in Australia? What is worth spending extra money on? What do you regret spending money on? And please tell me some of your amazing experiences in Australia - hiking a rainforest, scuba diving vs. snorkeling the GBR, parks you liked or didn't, quirky places not typically talked of... I honestly want to hear what everyone has to say about Australia! What's overrated or touristry, what should be seen but typically isn't... anything you'd like to mention! A bit about me is that I adore nature, so seeing the best rain forests/experiencing the Outback is important to me. Seeing wildlife would be awesome - I'm even considering shelling out $160 for a crocodile dive (has anyone done that?! Was it worth it?). Are the zoos worth visiting, or can you see wildlife outdoors anyway? I also love music and art, so any neat and cheap museums or outdoor art for free would be awesome to see. I realize this is really general, and if anyone doesn't want to share here, please feel free to PM me as well! I'm trying to get a ton if different ideas so I'm prepared for my WHV trip
    5. Just thought of gathering PIo-ers views on this. This is not intended as a debate between creationism and evolution or even about religions. It would be interesting to know what people think about how the World and all of nature came into being --- Was it created by a Supreme being/God or did it all come into being by itself. Any other views/ideas please note in replies.
    6. Jackboots

      Australian Nature ...

      Just a thought .. how about a thread of some of your favourite Australian nature Pictures ..
    7. Cerberus1

      New 7 wonders of nature

      The New 7 Wonders of Nature campaign is a global search to recognise the seven most wondrous natural sites in the world as voted by the general public. Uluru and the Great Barrier Reef have been shortlisted as two of the 28 finalists and now face stiff competition from other countries around the world to be named a New7Wonder of Nature. The list of nominees is as follows: Amazon - South America Angel Falls - Venezuela Bay of Fundy - Canada Black Forest - Germany Bu Tinah Island - United Arab Emirates Cliffs of Moher - Ireland Dead Sea - Israel, Jordan, Palestine El Yunque - Puerto Rico Galapagos - Ecuador Grand Canyon - USA Great Barrier Reef - Australia, PNG Halong Bay - Viet Nam Iguazu Falls - Argentina, Brazil Jeita Grotto - Lebanon Jeju Island - Korea (south) Kilimanjaro - Tanzania Komodo - Indonesia Islands of the Maldives - Maldives Masurian Lake District - Poland Matterhorn/Cervino - Italy, Switzerland Milford Sound - New Zealand Mud Volcanoes - Azerbaijan PP Underground River - Philippines Sundarbans - Bangladesh, India Table Mountain - South Africa Uluru - Australia Vesuvius - Italy Yushan - Chinese Taipei You can vote at http://www.new7wonders.com/vote-2?lang=en
    8. Guest

      Nature Versus Nurture

      Which side of the coin do you believe? That characteristics that each one of us have are either there from birth or are influenced by our surroundings from a very early age, or a mixture of both. To give an example, just for a minute forget the many illnesses that some are born with, schizophrenia, etc, but imagine you are a child being bought up in an environment where its parents and peers don't really give a toss about what they do or say, and go on their merry way treating people with disrespect and committing crimes, and the child involved does exactly the same thing. Is this behaviour such because they were inherently born with a said gene that was fundamental in their makeup, or has this behaviour been influenced by all they see and hear around them? I know many people who some would look down on, and they don't behave in such a way. But on the other hand people from exactly the same area behave without giving a toss in the world. I have a few friends who also wreak of money. Some of their behaviour is also abysmal, not all though. Can a person be born bad, (not including mental illness) because of a long line of genetics that have someway made their way into this person, or does their environment dictate how they lead their lives in the future? I personally think it is 'nurture' to a degree, because I have known some lads that were born into a really bad environment where crime etc was second nature but in the long run they have turned their lives around and am now 'normal' (hate that word) members of a functioning society and are happy and contented. Cheers Tony:chatterbox:
    9. gail39

      getting close to nature?????

      Had a very traumatic saturday evening,after being to the Gold coast (WetnWild)thought we would drive back over Tamborine mountain,as we had two cars,me following hubbie,as cars full of kids. Hubbie braked up hard in front of me,and we all got out to see what he was doing,and unfortunately a small grey roo had jumped in front of his mondeo....Poor muumy roo didnt make it,but guess what there is a happy ending,my daughter saw a small joey which had been catapulted like a cork from a bottle,and had landed on the road next to its mum.It was O.K but saturday night,no vets open ...What do we do with a small joey?Kids were blubbering as they wanted to keep it and have it as a pet!!!! Hubbie more concerned about the damage to his car,and wanted to get home..so to get to the point we called in at the local shop for some milk,(yes to feed it) and a babys bottle,when i told the woman in the shop what had happened,she said her hubbie rehomed them...PHEW what a relief.And the Roo will be hand fed at Australia zoo,or Currumbin Wildlife Park,and the car wil be fixed with sticky tape and rivets!!!!!:smile:
    10. Tim

      As Nature Intended

      AS NATURE INTENDED By Desmond Zwar Michael Turner and his wife, Jaki, were stark naked when I met them; strolling in the altogether down a path on tiny Bedarra Island, (the tropical retreat of the Duchess of York - years before she then made it fashionable). The Turners had been six months living the castaway life. Fishing for coral trout, scraping succulent oysters off the rocks, and baking them with island-grown taro in red-hot boulders covered with banana leaves; a long way from the conservative Colchester, Essex, that Michael Turner, entrepreneur had left at 20, to go to sea in the merchant navy. He remembers: "I arrived in Australia and was invited to a party. All the girls were in the lounge-room, the fellows crowded around a beer-keg in the kitchen. I got my beer and walked in to chat to the girls, who were very pretty indeed. "After a while one of the fellows came in and said: 'Michael, we're a bit worried about you. What're you doing in here?' "I said I was talking to the girls. He said: 'What are you? Some sort of poofter?'" Next day the young Englishman donned long socks, long shorts and cotton shirt to go to the beach. As he crunched down the sand, protected from the sun by a wide hat, he heard the comments: "Who's a goose? Who's a goose?" He laughs. Grey haired now, with a grey moustache he tugs when he tells a joke, he worries: that the carefree, wonderful Australia that he came to 35 years ago isn't the same. "It's become obstructive." But it wasn't that way when Michael Turner, hotel front-desk manager and door-to-door salesman launched himself into 1950s Melbourne... "I flew into Melbourne International Airport which was a large tin shed. I had come from lower-middle class Essex where my father bred tropical fish for a living, to a country I had heard was classless and stuck its finger up at things that got in the way. "I worked at a hotel until I realised there was big money to be made out there selling door-to-door. I sold refrigerators, floor-coverings, curtains and bedspreads. The ladies, I think, noted my English accent and thought that meant good education and honesty so they let me in." He sold so much to one appreciative suburban housewife that her husband offered him a job in insurance. Why not, asked Michael, when he was told he could make a hefty 500 pounds a week? He became so good at it he remained in insurance for 15 years, elevated to the office of Victorian marketing manager for the London-based Legal & General Insurance Company. But 15 years was past the Turner credo of a shift every three years. ("Start it up, take a year ironing out the problems, a year getting bored with it and then do something else.") By now he had met the sylph-like Jaki, and was ready for a career change. "Friends in insurance were having heart attacks at 40. Jaki and I found we could use a hammer and nails, so we started renovating little workers' cottages." Then - down went the hammers and this time the tropics beckoned. Michael's job as an assistant ship's purser and hotel training after he left the merchant navy, had given him enough skill to manage resorts. On Queensland’s Dunk Island he and Jaki entertained the Duke and Duchess of Bedford, Lord McAlpine and Australia's then Prime Minister, Malcolm Fraser, whom they dined with every night. "We then bought 70 acres on the Daintree River in the rainforest and operated a crocodile safari. No running water, no electricity and a public phone I had to run 60 yards to answer." But it was a roaring success. After that they opened a butterfly farm, learning from a text-book on breeding and with the help of a top lepidopterist, who shook his head and told them breeding butterflies was fraught with difficulties and they'd 'gotta be joking!' The Turners put up their own aviary, built their own home, put boardwalks over the mangroves and began greeting tourists from all over the world. They took their daily swim in a sun-dappled creek until a local woman was taken by a monster crocodile. When they heard developer Christopher Skase was building the Mirage resort at Port Douglas, the Turners moved there and set up Rainforest Habitat, the largest butterfly farm in Australia, adding 70 species of birds to flutter about with the exotically-hued butterflies inside the huge net enclosure. Soon there were fruit-bats and wallabies, too, but they had to be nursed like babies, so Jaki would smuggle them and baby bottles into 5-star hotels when they took a few days off. In a week or two they leave for Lae, in Papua-New Guinea, to create a butterfly house for the PNG Government. And after that? "We are thinking," said one of the few men who can look right in a white pith-helmet, "of a large eco-display at the foot of a cable-car that is being built. "But you know, the sense of adventure that attracted me to Australia from 12,000 miles away has been dampened. We may even leave and go somewhere else. "The Australia I knew when I came here no longer exists. "It is now run by petty bureaucrats whose whole thinking seems to be to place obstacles in front of anyone with enterprise. Their aim is to make it too difficult to succeed. "I recently flew to Guam to discuss a big wildlife project with three people from the equivalent of the National Parks and Wildlife Department here. Their attitude to me was immediately enthusiastic: 'Michael', they said, 'how can we help you?' "In Australia today the attitude of public servants is: 'There must be some rule you could be breaking, so we'd be better off stopping you before you begin.' "Isn't that a terrible shame?"
    ×

    Important Information

    We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By continuing to use our site, you also accept our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use