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Found 36 results

  1. Interested in potentially getting a better deal than your bank when sending money overseas? If so, you should consider using a foreign exchange specialist company when sending money to or from Australia. A specialist company, like Moneycorp, can offer you great exchange rates and free expert guidance on the Australian dollar to save you time and money when transferring money abroad. When using Moneycorp you can expect exchange rates that are typically up to 4% better than you would get from a high street bank - this can make a huge difference to your finances. Special offer - no transfer fees Your bank may charge you anything from £20 to £40 (or currency equivalent) to send your money to or from Australia. Moneycorp don’t charge commission and exclusively for Poms in Oz members all transfer fees are waived – so you can save money on transfer fees alone. How can I register for a free Moneycorp account? Thousands of forum members have saved money by using Moneycorp. It’s simple to register for a free account and the process only takes a few minutes – click here to register online with Moneycorp.
  2. Hi All, I've just set up a Moneycorp account and am emailing my proof od ID's as we speak.. Can someone please clarify if we can do the below? 1. Send money from our UK bank account to our Oz bank accounts? 2. Set up a transfer to happen each month from our Oz bank account to our UK account (as we still need to pay loan), is this done using a sterling number or Aus$? I've looked all over their website but am not 100% clear! Thanks, Jay
  3. Currency Transfers with Moneycorp

    A Guide to Sending Money Overseas Hundreds of Poms in Oz members have benefited from using Moneycorp for their international money transfers. Moneycorp’s services are straightforward, simple to use and will save you money. The following text outlines the 4 step process and how it works. 1. Set up your Moneycorp account To start making money transfers, you will need to open an account with Moneycorp. This can be done online and only takes a few minutes - click here to register Opening an account carries no costs or obligations on your behalf. 2. Choose the best solution for your needs Once your Account is set up, your personal account manager will contact you to identify and discuss your specific requirements. They will be your personal point of contact for all future transactions and will explain the proposed course of action and options that best suits your personal needs. 3. Arrange your finances Once you have verbally agreed to a money transfer with your personal account manager, you will be sent a Contract Summary outlining the details. This document will include a form giving you instructions on how to transfer your funds to Moneycorp. The Contract Summary will also include a Transfer Instruction form, on which you will need to put details of the bank account(s) into which you would like your currency to be paid following your transaction. For further information regarding the different options when buying your currency, please click here 4. Payment methods You may use one of a variety of payment methods to send your funds to Moneycorp. Everything will be explained clearly by our staff and there is a dedicated customer service team who can help you with any questions you might have. Poms in Oz & Moneycorp Exclusively for PomsInOz members, you will not pay any transfer fees when sending your money overseas. Register with Moneycorp by clicking here For more information, call +44 (0)20 7589 3000, please remember to quote PomsInOz.
  4. A Guide to Sending Money Overseas Hundreds of Poms in Oz members have benefited from using Moneycorp for their international money transfers. Moneycorp’s services are straightforward, simple to use and will save you money. The following text outlines the 4 step process and how it works. 1. Set up your Moneycorp account To start making money transfers, you will need to open an account with Moneycorp. This can be done online and only takes a few minutes - click here to register Opening an account carries no costs or obligations on your behalf. 2. Choose the best solution for your needs Once your Account is set up, your personal account manager will contact you to identify and discuss your specific requirements. They will be your personal point of contact for all future transactions and will explain the proposed course of action and options that best suits your personal needs. 3. Arrange your finances Once you have verbally agreed to a money transfer with your personal account manager, you will be sent a Contract Summary outlining the details. This document will include a form giving you instructions on how to transfer your funds to Moneycorp. The Contract Summary will also include a Transfer Instruction form, on which you will need to put details of the bank account(s) into which you would like your currency to be paid following your transaction. For further information regarding the different options when buying your currency, please click here 4. Payment methods You may use one of a variety of payment methods to send your funds to Moneycorp. Everything will be explained clearly by our staff and there is a dedicated customer service team who can help you with any questions you might have. Poms in Oz & Moneycorp Exclusively for PomsInOz members, you will not pay any transfer fees when sending your money overseas. Register with Moneycorp by clicking here For more information, call +44 (0)20 7589 3000, please remember to quote PomsInOz.
  5. just tried to open an account with moneycorp, recieved an email to say that they can't transfer funds due to strict regulations in Australia??.
  6. banks, hifx and moneycorp

    Hi I'm a brand new member due to immigrate in Australia from France. I'm struggling with which bank which money transfer question and would be grateful to hear anyones advise and/or experiences. Oh we're moving to WA Perth or south of Perth area if that makes a diiference. Thanks!
  7. Hi, Arrived in Canberra today and am hoping to transfer money using Moneycorp from my UK account into Australian account. All the phone numbers seem to be UK ones... Is there not an Australian number? It will be expensive to call UK number. IS it possible to do it on-line? Thanks, Mike.
  8. Hi guys, Just looking at which bank to go with here in AUS and as i will be using MoneyCorp i was wondering what charges (if any) people have encountered when transferring money in and out of the counry (to/from the UK) with the AUS banks.... ...I have ben thinking about going with Commenwealth Bank but not really sure.... It states on their website they charge $22 for international money transfers but i'm unsure if this would be charged if going through MoneyCorp Cheers Roflie
  9. Hi, I am currenty in Oz and i want to transfer some money from my Lloyds tsb account in england to my NAB account in Oz. I have transferred via Money corp when i was in england and I know as a poms member NAB dont charge any recieving fees from Moneycorp however, as moneycorp business account is with HSBC i was told i would get charged transferring money to the moneycorp HSBC account from my Lloyds. I decided to put the cash in HSBC moneycorp physically myself and sent a copy of this to Moneycorp and it went through all ok. The problem is i am now in Oz and i wish to pay NO fees. How do i transfer from my Lloyds account to Money corp free of charge. I have the online GPS... would this work. Hopefully john will answer my uestion.
  10. [img2=right]http://www.pomsinoz.com/forum/../images/moneycorp-graph-pio.png[/img2] Australian dollar – review from Moneycorp Following the spike in autumn 2008, which took it to a five-year high at $2.70, sterling spent two years on the retreat, losing more than half its peak value in the process. It bottomed out at $1.51 in late December, an all-time low, rebounding to $1.60 in early January. Since then it has gone nowhere. For eight weeks the pound has inhabited a five-cent-wide channel between $1.5750 and $1.6250, moving up and down through the $1.60 midpoint two or three times a week. There is no particular reason for the Aussie's temporarily high correlation with sterling. If anything, the dollar should still be making hay while the sun shines on its 4.75% Cash Rate as it snows on the pound's 0.5% Bank Rate. The two currencies are subject to different pressures even apart from the interest rate differential. The UK economy is heavily dependent on the contribution from financial services, a sector that was hard-hit by the crisis and precipitated the recession. Australia's mining and agricultural sectors are big exporters of products for which there has been consistent demand from, among others, China. That steady flow of exports helped Australia to avoid recession entirely. Britain's economy grew by 1.5% in 2010 while growth in Australia pushed ahead by 2.7%. Investors are under no compulsion to keep currencies on the move, even though that is what they usually do. With the goings-on in Egypt, Libya and the Gulf they see no reason to send GBP/AUD one way or the other, hence this temporary stability in the exchange rate. But that it what it is likely to be; temporary. The next chapter For more than twenty years the pound spent the vast majority of its time wandering between $2 and $3. Against that background the Australian dollar's current strength could be a fluke, soon to be corrected. It could also reflect a fundamental change in the world order. The pain felt by Britain's economy is far from over. Negative growth in the fourth quarter of 2010 was a reminder that there is no simple choice between forward and reverse for an economy. America has shown that growth does not necessarily bring more jobs and greater spending power. UK government spending cuts and tax increases will be felt more deeply as the months go by and it will be years before things get back to "normal". House prices are stagnant and there is a yawning gulf between bid and offer. The indices from Halifax, Nationwide and the Land Registry that plot transaction prices show an average property changing hands at £162,854. The one from Rightmove that plots asking prices shows sellers asking £233,121 for that same average house. Another problem is the inflation that eats further into people's spending power. At 4% it is twice as high as it should be. Without January's VAT increase and high oil and food prices inflation would be fairly close to its 2% target but that's like saying without all this rain we would be able to sunbathe. It looks as though the Bank of England is beginning to lean towards an interest rate increase, if only to prove to the world that it is not asleep on the job. That prospect is helping the pound. The Australian dollar has already done that legwork. With no recession to worry about the Reserve Bank of Australia has raised its cash rate from 3% to 4.75% over the last 18 months. The rate could go higher still in the second half of this year. There has been no fall in house prices either, despite warnings of a bubble. The Economist said recently that Australian house prices are the most inflated in the world, 56% above fair value. It is not a new argument but it does make you wonder whether the 5.8% increase in 2010 reported by the Australian Bureau of Statistics will be repeated in 2011. The other bubble faced by the Australian economy and the dollar is the one inflating in Southeast Asia. Beijing has so far been reluctant to lean too heavily on the rising commodity and asset prices that are fuelling inflation there but analysts worry that the longer the authorities do nothing, the bigger the problem they lay in store. If demand from China were to slow sharply it would dampen appetite for the Australian dollar and other commodity-related currencies. Summary After more than two months steady around $1.60 the only reason to expect the GBP/AUD exchange rate to move is because it cannot remain static forever. Still close to its all-time highs against the US dollar, the euro, the yen and the pound the Aussie is undoubtedly overvalued. That suggests the next move for sterling will be upward but it does not indicate when, nor does it prevent the Aussie becoming even more overvalued in the meantime. Click here for more information on the Australian dollar and receiving the best exchange rates.
  11. so im assuming Moneycorp dont do this for the goodness of there health so where do i lose money/ where do they make money. If im transferring £20000 at a 1.60 rate will all that still be mine or do i lose it to money corp or the bank, im with westpac
  12. Hi John, Hope all is well :smile: Just a quick question please. Is the GPS system an online application where I can setup the bank accounts etc and do transfers online at my leisure from home? If so, how can I get access to the GPS system? I am already a moneycorp member. Cheers B!K3R
  13. Plan ahead by moving overseas with the experts! Moving to Australia is not without its ups and downs. To make sure you stay ahead of the game, it pays to be well informed. Everyone wants to start their new life down under with as much money as possible and there are a number of things you can do to ensure you make the most of your funds. Key topics always discussed on the forum include moving your possessions and transferring your money into your new Australian bank account. Poms in Oz is hosting Live Chat sessions with leading experts in banking, currency exchange and international removals. These sessions will take place today from 12pm-2pm and 8pm-10pm (UK Time). National Australia Bank, Moneycorp and PSS International Removals will be on hand to answer any questions you may have about your move. To participate in the chat sessions, select the 'chat' menu option at the top of the page., this will launch the chat software. There will different 'rooms' for each of the different companies. If you are an unregistered visitor, to take part, use this link - Chat with Industry Experts. Once the chat software has loaded, tick the 'Guest' option at the top of the chat window, then choose a username and enter the 'Moneycorp, NAB or PSS' chat rooms. National Australia Bank [img2=right]http://www.pomsinoz.com/images/chat-nab.png[/img2] Rebecca Joils will talk about the Australian Banking system providing you with some insights as to what is different between the UK and Australia. She will also talk about how straight forward it is to open an Australian Bank account before you leave home and some of the services you should consider. Moneycorp [img2=right]http://www.pomsinoz.com/images/chat-moneycorp.png[/img2] Whether you are moving to Australia, or living there already, Jonathan Griffith and John Kinghorn will bring you the latest updates on the Aussie dollar and provide insight into the key factors influencing market movements. Exchange rates are constantly fluctuating and transferring your funds at the right time, via the right channel, can make a big difference to the amount of money you actually end up with. PSS International Removals [img2=right]http://www.pomsinoz.com/images/chat-pss.png[/img2] One of the key ingredients when you are moving overseas is the planning of your removal. Liam Witham and John Moynes will be on hand to offer advice and answer any questions you may have regarding the packing and shipping of your household effects, including what items you can ship to Australia, Australian Customs procedures and AQIS. Whether you are importing household effects or just a vehicle, it is never too early to start researching or to start the process.
  14. Hi, I am moving to Sydney in 10 days. I need to send £2000 over and have already set up an NAB account. Is moneycorp my best option? I don't really have time to shop around. I think they said they will charge me a £15 transfer fee, whereas HSBC (my current bank) will charge £17. I don't know how much the exchange rate compares between banks and moneycorp. If anyone could let me know my best option that would be great, or let me know their experiences of moneycorp. Thanks! Arghh nervous now!
  15. STERLING AHEAD ON ALMOST EVERY FRONT UK retail sales report strongest in three years. Low inflation print suggests no change for AUD interest rates this week. As far as the UK economic data were concerned it was a low-key week for sterling. Nationwide announced a -0.5% monthly fall in house prices, the Bank of England reported a slight fall in the number of mortgage approvals in June. Gfk's index of consumer confidence was three points lower at -22. The only statistic that made any difference - and it was a positive one - was the CBI's distributive trades survey. It was surprisingly strong with a net 33% of shopkeepers reporting higher sales in July; the strongest reading for three years. In one of sterling's luckier weeks it had also a minimal amount of non-statistical flak to avoid. The National Institute for Economic and Social Research (NIESR) shot wide when it assessed the risk of Britain's economy falling back into recession next year at one in five. Prior to June's emergency budget that risk was one in seven. NIESR thinks living standards will not return to pre-crisis levels until 2015, roughly the same time horizon recently mentioned by the Federal Reserve in the States. Another damper-than-usual squib was Bank of England Governor Mervyn King's appearance in front of the Treasury Select Committee. His comments were in line with recent Monetary Policy Committee minutes and sparked no reaction from sterling. The governor was evasive at times: Answering a question about the impact of the emergency budget, and the risk of it derailing the recovery, he said 'I don't think it made a significant difference to whether we would get what is technically called a double-dip recession.' Two inflation measures last week rained on the parade of those looking for higher Australian interest rates. At the beginning of the week the producer price index - factory gate prices - went up by 0.2% in the second quarter of the year after analysts had predicted it would rise by 0.8%. Although that took the year-on-year increase to 1.0% that was still well below the 1.5% annual rise investors had been looking for. The disappointment on Wednesday was even greater when the consumer price index rose by considerably less than the 1% that markets had been expecting. At 0.6% CPI inflation was well short of the level that would make an interest rate increase by the Reserve Bank of Australia inevitable at this week's policy meeting. A survey of 23 economists by Bloomberg found all of them predicting the RBA would leave its benchmark interest rate unchanged at 4.5% on Tuesday. Taking advantage of Britain's impressive GDP performance in Q2, sterling made it back to the top of the range that has held it for a fortnight. It shows no sign of breaking higher as long as investors lean towards the growth-and-recovery story and continue to favour the currencies with higher yields. Buyers of the Australian dollar should continue to hedge 50% of their requirement.
  16. Hi everyone I have been asked if I can receive money via Moneycorp as it might be cheaper for me to receive the money this way and for the person to send it. Does anyone know if this is possible? Is there any cost to me to set up / receive / withdraw via Moneycorp? Any advice would be appreciated. Love Rudi x
  17. hi to all ive just sold my house and pondering should i put all my proseeds into moneycorp in one go or drip feed it any help tonyl
  18. All I know that Moneycorp have a very big presence here but was interested if anyone has had problems with them - I need to transfer the money from the sale of my house back to the UK and the thought of handing a company whom I've only ever come across on the internet my entire life savings makes me nervous. I've searched for horror stories on the web and cant find any. I'm assuming many people here would have used them - I'm not looking for you to recommend them simply to confirm if everything went smoothly. Thanks PerthGooner
  19. Chat live with Moneycorp now

    Just a quick reminder that we are currently holding a live chat session with Moneycorp, which will run until aprox. 21:30 UK time. To take part, click the 'chat' button at the top of the page (in the orange menu bar) or use this link - Moneycorp Chat Once the chat software has loaded, enter the 'Moneycorp' chat room. (If you're a guest on the website, when the chat window loads, click the green icon next to where it says Unregistered ( available) - then choose 'Edit your profile' and choose a nickname first.) John Kinghorn and Jonathan Griffith from Moneycorp are hosting the chat and will be on hand to answer and exchange rate / money transfer queries you may have The session will will last approximately 2 hours. Whether you are moving to Australia, or living there already, John will provide the latest updates on the Aussie dollar and give you some insight into the key influencing factors. Exchange rates are constantly fluctuating and transferring your money at the right time, via the right channel, will make a big difference.
  20. Poms in Oz is hosting a “post general election” Live Chat session with John Kinghorn from Moneycorp on 11th May 2010 to answer all your queries on the Australian dollar. The session will start at 7:30pm (UK time), and will last approximately 2 hours. Whether you are moving to Australia, or living there already, John will provide the latest updates on the Aussie dollar and give you some insight into the key influencing factors. Exchange rates are constantly fluctuating and transferring your money at the right time, via the right channel, will make a big difference!
  21. The market's first reaction to the as-yet incomplete election result has not been promising for sterling. By the time London opened on Friday morning the pound was four cents lower against the US dollar and down by two against the euro, compared with its levels when the polling stations opened on Thursday. Clearly, investors are not overjoyed by the result. How can this be, given the months of warning from the opinion polls that there would be no overall majority? Investors, like gamblers and football supporters, have a dangerous tendency towards optimism that can sometimes backfire on them. In the day or two before the election, and despite the polls still pointing to a hung parliament, that optimism led them to expect the outcome to be, if you like, better than expected. We now know that it was not. Parliament is jaw-droppingly well hung and nobody knows who will be occupying Number Ten in a week's time. What worries investors now is the possibility that the occupant might still be Gordon Brown, not because they dislike or distrust him but because his position has been hugely compromised. A hung parliament under the management of a new prime ministerial broom offers- realistically or not - the promise of change and progress. One led by a still-unelected incumbent and handicapped by the demands of a coalition partner simply means less of the same. The worry is that the 'less' in this case would be less determination to reduce the nation's debt and less commitment to making the 'difficult decisions' necessary to prevent the UK going the way of Greece. Had the result been a little more clear-cut, the pound would probably have come out of the election in better shape. It is not as if a hung parliament came as a surprise. But investors hate uncertainty. To be told that it may take ten days to form a coalition or minority government is one thing; to maintain enthusiasm for sterling throughout those ten days is quite another. It is conceivable that investors will take a shine to a new prime minister if one emerges from the horse-trading, and that they will renew their support for the pound. It is less easy to imagine them throwing their hats in the air for the old one. In the meantime, uncertainty is likely to gnaw away at sentiment towards the pound. The latest GBP/AUD exchange rate can be found here.
  22. We are almost at the stage where we need to choose an FX company to transfer some money over to Oz and wondered if you could help us with our decision of who to use? Can anyone give us comparison tips and suggestions on who to use? Thanks very much!
  23. Weekly currency update from Moneycorp [moneycorp]10168283[/moneycorp]
  24. Poms in Oz is hosting a Live Chat session with Nat Davison from Moneycorp on 31st March 2010 to answer all your queries on the Australian dollar. The session will start at 8am (EST), 10pm UK time, and will last approximately 2 hours. Whether you are moving to Australia, or living there already, Nat will provide the latest updates on the Aussie dollar and give you some insight into the key influencing factors. Exchange rates are constantly fluctuating and transferring your money at the right time, via the right channel, will make a big difference!:idea:
  25. Some users seem to have issues logging on to live chat, so Nat will any queries on this thread.