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      Found 4 results

      1. I notice that a marketing specialist is one of the occupations on the new skilled occupations list. Does that mean if I get hired by a contractor over there I could get a permanent residence visa? As I am over 45 I am discriminated against and get zero points, yet if I was 29 I would get 100 points for some bizarre reason. I know considerably more about marketing now than I did then, so logically I should get 100 points now and get zero points at 29 years old. But as we all know there is no logic when it comes to Australia and immigration. It's crazy and illogical and makes no sense. I would score highly on their English test too. I know people who have got into Australia and their grammar and spelling are appalling, yet somehow they are allowed in. Makes no sense. Anyway I divert, back to my question. I noticed that a Marketing Specialist is on the 2017/2018 list of occupations. I am a marketing specialist! If I get a few Australian clients including one or two clients in the city I want to live in would I get into Australia or would they find a reason to deny me entry?
      2. Hi All, Was discussing these changes with a friend last night in regards to the upcoming changes, especially for those who have lodged a 187 DE application and/or nomination under an occupation which is not on the MLTSSL. I was just reading through the PAM3 this morning and from my understanding this guidance (I have attached) basically rules out a nomination approval if your application is not decided by March 2018 and does not appear on the MLTSSL. Keep in mind I'm referring to the Direct Entry stream. Just looking for some input from any MA's or people who have information. Questions: 1) Given the guidance that currently exists on the latest stack as of 7/9, has there been any further advice on the "additional regional occupations" that were promised under this reform? 2) Is lodging a nomination at this stage currently advisable for employers who seek to nominate highly-skilled non-MLTSSL positions (ANZSCO 1)? Here is the guidance I refer to, of which the last paragraph is most relevant: 10.3.3 Approvable occupations specified in the latest legislative instrument For RSMS any occupation with a skill level within ANZSCO skill levels 1 to 3 may be nominated. Regulation 5.19(4)(h)(i)(A) (ENS Direct Entry stream) and Regulation 5.19(4)(h)(ii)(D) (RSMS Direct Entry stream) provide that the delegate must be satisfied that the nominated occupation and its corresponding 6-digit code correspond to an occupation and its corresponding 6-digit code specified in a legislative instrument. In practice, this means that: when assessing nominations under Regulation 5.19(4)(h)(i)(A) delegates must confirm that the nominated occupation is included on the Medium and Long term Strategic Skills List (MLTSSL) or the Short term Skilled Occupation List (STSOL), which lists occupations that can be approved in relation to permanent employer sponsored nominations under the ENS Direct Entry stream; when assessing nominations under Regulation 5.19(4)(h)(ii)(D) delegates must confirm that the nominated occupation is included in the legislative instrument in relation to permanent employer sponsored nominations under the RSMS Direct Entry stream. delegates must be satisfied that the tasks of the nominated position effectively align with the tasks for that occupation as outlined in the Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO). Important: As of 19 April 2017, the legislative instrument referred to above contains two schedules, the MLTSSL, which replaced the former Skilled Occupation List (SOL), and the STSOL which replaced the Consolidated Sponsored Occupation List (CSOL). Occupations listed in Schedule 1 (MLTSSL) and Schedule 2 (STSOL) to the instrument are eligible for the PESE ENS Direct Entry stream. A full list of these occupations is available on the Department’s website. Some occupations on the list are restricted to certain situations via a caveat - refer to legislative instrument The list can change with occupations being removed or added. If the legislative instrument has changed since the application was made, officers should confirm that the nominated occupation is specified in the current legislative instrument. If the nominated occupation is not listed on the current legislative instrument at the time of making the decision, the nomination cannot be approved. The STSOL and MLTSSL will be updated every six months based on advice from the Department of Employment. Listed caveats will provide additional requirements or exclusions for a number of listed occupations. Since Regulation 5.19 are time of decision requirements, this can mean that an occupation on the STSOL and MLTSSL at the time of lodgement is either no longer on these lists or is further constrained by caveats at time of decision and therefore cannot be approved. In these instances applicants will be afforded the opportunity to withdraw the nomination and associated visa application. The improved agility of the STSOL and MLTSSL to respond to ‘on the ground’ labour market conditions will strengthen the skilled migration programme to react to real-time skill shortages. The STSOL and MLTSSL continues to cover a range of managerial, professional, technical and trade occupations at ANZSCO skill levels 1, 2 and 3.
      3. Skilled Occupations List April 2017

        Only certain occupations are approved for use under Australia’s permanent and temporary skilled visa programmes. These occupations are listed in a legislative instrument that contains two schedules or ‘occupation lists’ that apply to different visa programmes. On 19 April 2017, the: Medium and Long-term Strategic Skills List (MLTSSL) replaced the previous ‘Skilled Occupation List’ (SOL) and is available in Schedule 1 of the relevant legislative instrument Short-term Skilled Occupation List (STSOL) replaced the previous ‘Consolidated Sponsored Occupation List’ (CSOL) and is available in Schedule 2 of the relevant legislative instrument. The information below explains which lists are relevant for particular visa programmes. Information is also provided about occupations that were removed from the list of eligible skilled occupations on 19 April 2017. Note: different eligible occupation arrangements are in place for the Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme visa (subclass 186). List of eligible skilled occupations Only certain occupations are approved for use under Australia’s permanent and temporary skilled visa programmes. These occupations are listed in a legislative instrument that contains two schedules or ‘occupation lists’ that apply to different visa programmes. On 19 April 2017, the: Medium and Long-term Strategic Skills List (MLTSSL) replaced the previous ‘Skilled Occupation List’ (SOL) and is available in Schedule 1 of the relevant legislative instrument Short-term Skilled Occupation List (STSOL) replaced the previous ‘Consolidated Sponsored Occupation List’ (CSOL) and is available in Schedule 2 of the relevant legislative instrument. The information below explains which lists are relevant for particular visa programmes. Information is also provided about occupations that were removed from the list of eligible skilled occupations on 19 April 2017. Note: different eligible occupation arrangements are in place for the Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme visa (subclass 186). Expand all Medium and Long-term Strategic Skills List (MLTSSL) You must nominate an occupation on the Medium and Long-term Strategic Skills List (MLTSSL)if you are applying for any of the below: Skilled Independent visa (subclass 189) Skilled Regional (Provisional) visa (subclass 489) (unless nominated by a State or Territory Government) Temporary Graduate visa (subclass 485) – Graduate Work Stream. Short-term Skilled Occupation List (STSOL) There is no separate STSOL list on our website as visa programmes that utilise this list can also access some additional occupations on the MLTSSL. For ease of reference, we have combined both the STSOL and the eligible MLTSSL occupations together. See: Combined list of eligible skilled occupations. You must nominate an occupation on this Combined list of eligible skilled occupations if you are applying for any of the below: Employer Nominated Scheme (subclass 186) – Direct Entry Stream Skilled Nominated visa (subclass 190) Skilled Regional (Provisional) visa (subclass 489) - if nominated by a State or Territory Government Temporary Work (Skilled) visa (subclass 457) Training visa (subclass 407) Removed occupations On 19 April 2017, 200 occupations were removed entirely from the STSOL. See:List of the removed occupations A further 16 occupations on the MLTSSL were restricted to only apply to the following visa programmes: Skilled – Independent (subclass 189) Temporary Graduate (subclass 485) Skilled-Regional(Provisional) (subclass 489), if the applicant is not nominated by a State or Territory government agency See: Medium and Long-term Strategic Skills List (MLTSSL) These changes will only apply to new applications lodged on, or after, 19 April 2017 for: Employer Nominated Scheme (subclass 186) – Direct Entry Stream Skilled Nominated visa (subclass 190) Skilled Regional (Provisional) visa (subclass 489) - if nominated by a State or Territory Government Training visa (subclass 407) However, for the subclass 457 programme for any of these removed occupations on, or after, 19 April 2017: no visa applications can be granted no nomination applications can be approved. Source: DIBP
      4. By Robert Williams 03/05/2017 Email admin[at]pomsinoz.com India’s Prime Minister has voiced his reservations to the Australian PM about the Government’s recent decision to phase out and replace the 457 visa next year. India was perturbed by the Federal Govt’s announcement last month that the popular 457 visa would be stopped in 2018 and replaced and replaced with the completely new Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) visa which will assist businesses in addressing bona fide skill shortages. The TSS Visa is a four year visa is your occupation is on the Medium and Long term Strategic Skilled List (MLTSSL) or two years is your occupation isn't on the MLTSSL The Australian PM described the changes as being “in the national interest”. At present, Indian nationals make up a quarter of 457 visa holders - the most of any nationality. India had hinted the move to replace it could affect trade negotiations, which the two countries had only just pledged to revive during Mr Turnbull’s recent India visit in early April. Now, according to India’s Ministry of External Affairs, Mr Modi himself has “expressed concern” to Mr Turnbull about the possible impact of visa changes. In response to the announced Visa changes, India’s Ministry of External Affairs issued a terse statement, saying that it was “examining the consequences” of the new policy, adding that it would look at the matter “in the context” of trade negotiations. Elsewhere, Anisha Gupta, an Indian migration has suggested that Visa changes will damage Australia’s longer-term ability to attract both skilled workers and students with an eye to their futures. “I’m receiving a lot of calls from the applicants, as well as the people who have already applied for the visa — how will that affect them?” she said. (Current visa holders will not be affected by the changes, which will see the introduction of two new temporary skills visas — a two-year visa and a more specialised one for four years “targeted at higher skills”.) Ms Gupta warns changing the visa system will likely hurt Australian universities’ efforts to attract Indian students, especially those seeking degrees in the 200 professions the Government is removing from the list of those eligible for skilled worker visas. That would affect the students if they think their occupations are out of the list, so they might choose another country which has a more favourable immigration policy for them,” she said.