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Found 24 results

  1. ArthurPendragon

    The world's largest democratic event

    India, the most populous democracy on the planet, is about to hold elections that will seat a new parliament and prime minister. It will be the largest democratic event in history. India's election commission is charged with what has been called the world's largest event management exercise, making sure that democracy doesn't falter in the vastness of the numbers. About 15,000 candidates from 500 political parties are vying for 543 seats in the Lok Sabha, or lower house of Parliament. Those candidates are expected to spend about $5 billion on campaigning. That's second only to the most expensive U.S. presidential campaign -- $7 billion in 2012. Parliamentary elections in India are held every five years, unless the government is dissolved before that. This year will be India's 16th election since independence in 1947. The voting begins Monday and the numbers are mind-blowing. http://edition.cnn.com/interactive/2014/04/world/infographic-india-by-the-numbers/
  2. ......who would get your vote? I've kept the results private for those that wouldn't prefer to disclose who they vote for. Personally, If I was back in the UK I'd be home in Scotland. So I'd vote SNP. This isn't necessarily a vote for independence, just at the moment they seem to be the only UK party actually going out and representing the interest of their constituants. I've been reading lately how the UK could be heading back into another recession. Apparently it's to do with "external influences". Though most probably it's to do with these draconian austerity measures. Even though the Tories have known for a while their plan isn't working, they seem determined to let the UK run into the ground for the sake of their ideology. Anyway, just my opinion. No doubt with it being CTF. They'll be someone along in a minute out to prove me wrong. :laugh:
  3. Guest

    Election

    Morning All Have been listening to the news this morning and heard that it could be another coalition Government, just wondered what thoughts people had about what would be the best outcome for us migrants? I was thinking it would be good if the current Government won as hopefully the SMP's could then soon be released as was their intention before the election was called. Thanks Gemma
  4. PommyPaul

    Election day Pomsinoz style

    Well since alot of us can't vote i thought it might be fun to run a one day poll on election day to see who we'd bring into power :cool: So fellow poms (and non poms that frequent the forum) cast your vote.
  5. The day has finally arrived. I havent got a clue who I should be backing or hoping to win. Abbott wants to cut immigration whereas we all know the changes that labor have made have delayed loads of visa applicants. So , Im asking the question who do we think would be best suited to get the Job of sorting out the migration policy so that its FAIR and also serves a purpose to a proseprous Australia. Who do we need to win so that those people in the pipeline are given a fair go. Personally its not happening under Labor what the the proposed cap and cease or retrospective plans. Any ideas fellow PIOs as things are getting close. Cheers and lets hope we all get the news we want offshore or onshore applicants I wish you all well Shane
  6. Guest

    Aussie Election

    Anyone here know the exact date when final election result comes out? so big impact and uncertainty posed on the immigration policies by the governing party to be on stage.
  7. Hi there, Firstly my appoligies if this is posted elsewhere, but this is my first post. If anyone could help me with my question i would be really gratefull. My partner has been offered a job in perth and has submitted his 457 visa around 2 weeks ago. We have since been told though that with the up ad coming election all visa will be put on hold untill after the election has taken place. I understand that the current prime minster only has powers in a caretaker capacity and therefore cannot sign off any major changes, but i dont understand how that effects our visa as we are not waiting for confirmation on any lists or plans etc. If any one can clear this for me i might be able to sleep a little better tonight.
  8. connaust

    Imimigration Debate Cartoon

    Cartoon by Nicholson in The Australian 23 July 2010 re. Immigration debate and politicians "dog whistling" or playing the "race card". In recent weeks many, especially business and human rights groups, have complained about too much negativity and misinformation about immigration, population, refugees etc. Politicians have to be careful that while endeavouring to capture short term votes, they are not alienating their future constituencies.....
  9. Caretaker period leading up to the Federal election On 17 July 2010, the Prime Minister of Australia, the Hon Julia Gillard MP, announced that a federal election would be conducted on 21 August 2010 and as such the Australian Government has assumed a caretaker role. Guidance on caretaker conventions is available from Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet website. See: Guidelines and Procedures
  10. Australia will have a federal election on August 21.
  11. Hi all With the Australian Federal election having been called today, I thought it might be interesting to compare the parties' recent comments about immigration policy. To access the full document, please click on the highlighted links below. Best regards Susan _________________________________________ THE GILLARD GOVERNMENT Extract from presentation by the Minister for Immigration and Citizenship, at the Population Australia 2050 Summit, 28 June 2010. · We are moving from the ‘Australia needs skills’ to ‘Skills Australia needs’ approach · A program that is shaped by employers' needs rather than by the desire of prospective migrants to come to Australia. · We are also reviewing our migrant selection process. · We are reviewing the Points Test scheme to ensure that it is not heavily distorted towards a handful of occupations—a problem that has been addressed through our recent changes to Skilled Occupations List. · But there is still further work to be done. We need to ensure that our points test enables us to select highly innovative and well trained migrants to ensure we have a solid human capital base for Australia's longer term prosperity. · My department is contemplating a new migrant selection model. · Under this model, prospective immigrants will be invited to lodge an expression of interest to emigrate to Australia, and will be selected for migration as and when the need arises. · Australia's net migration levels should be driven by permanent migration not temporary. · Thanks to recent reform measures, it is expected that the net overseas migration figure will return to a sustainable long-term average THE ALTERNATIVE GOVERNMENT: Extract from Coalition Policy Directions Paper · The primary purpose of a nation’s migration programme is economic, namely to supplement natural increase to create critical market mass in the domestic economy and service the skills needs of a growing economy. · The migration programme run by the Coalition will once again have the primary focus on providing skilled migration on both a permanent and temporary basis and supporting the viability of rural and regional communities around Australia. · Key features of the Coalition policy will include: reinstatement of a genuine critical skills list designed to reflect genuine occupational skills needs of industry liberalisation of arrangements for temporary business visas (457s)subject to clear standards, to make them more accessible to business, especially small businesses, and business in regional areas, with proven skills shortage needs ensuring at least two thirds of our permanent intake is for skills migration encouraging settlement on either a temporary or permanent basis in regional and rural areas. · Further details of the Coalition skilled and regional migration policies will be contained in the Coalition immigration and citizenship policy.
  12. Here we go Julia Gillard announced the election on 21st August 2010 Gillard seeks mandate at Australian federal election on August 21 | The Australian
  13. Guest

    21st August Election Date

    21st august announced as a election date but now question is if liberals win (unlikely) then new immigration minister will come so is it gonna make any difference for us or atleast put cap and cease bill on hold ?
  14. Hi all With the Australian Federal election having been called today, I thought it might be interesting to compare the parties' recent comments about immigration policy. To access the full document, please click on the highlighted links below. Best regards Susan _________________________________________ THE GILLARD GOVERNMENT Extract from presentation by the Minister for Immigration and Citizenship, at the Population Australia 2050 Summit, 28 June 2010. · We are moving from the ‘Australia needs skills’ to ‘Skills Australia needs’ approach · A program that is shaped by employers' needs rather than by the desire of prospective migrants to come to Australia. · We are also reviewing our migrant selection process. · We are reviewing the Points Test scheme to ensure that it is not heavily distorted towards a handful of occupations—a problem that has been addressed through our recent changes to Skilled Occupations List. · But there is still further work to be done. We need to ensure that our points test enables us to select highly innovative and well trained migrants to ensure we have a solid human capital base for Australia's longer term prosperity. · My department is contemplating a new migrant selection model. · Under this model, prospective immigrants will be invited to lodge an expression of interest to emigrate to Australia, and will be selected for migration as and when the need arises. · Australia's net migration levels should be driven by permanent migration not temporary. · Thanks to recent reform measures, it is expected that the net overseas migration figure will return to a sustainable long-term average THE ALTERNATIVE GOVERNMENT: Extract from Coalition Policy Directions Paper · The primary purpose of a nation’s migration programme is economic, namely to supplement natural increase to create critical market mass in the domestic economy and service the skills needs of a growing economy. · The migration programme run by the Coalition will once again have the primary focus on providing skilled migration on both a permanent and temporary basis and supporting the viability of rural and regional communities around Australia. · Key features of the Coalition policy will include: reinstatement of a genuine critical skills list designed to reflect genuine occupational skills needs of industry liberalisation of arrangements for temporary business visas (457s)subject to clear standards, to make them more accessible to business, especially small businesses, and business in regional areas, with proven skills shortage needs ensuring at least two thirds of our permanent intake is for skills migration encouraging settlement on either a temporary or permanent basis in regional and rural areas. · Further details of the Coalition skilled and regional migration policies will be contained in the Coalition immigration and citizenship policy.
  15. Poms in Oz is hosting a “post general election” Live Chat session with John Kinghorn from Moneycorp on 11th May 2010 to answer all your queries on the Australian dollar. The session will start at 7:30pm (UK time), and will last approximately 2 hours. Whether you are moving to Australia, or living there already, John will provide the latest updates on the Aussie dollar and give you some insight into the key influencing factors. Exchange rates are constantly fluctuating and transferring your money at the right time, via the right channel, will make a big difference!
  16. The market's first reaction to the as-yet incomplete election result has not been promising for sterling. By the time London opened on Friday morning the pound was four cents lower against the US dollar and down by two against the euro, compared with its levels when the polling stations opened on Thursday. Clearly, investors are not overjoyed by the result. How can this be, given the months of warning from the opinion polls that there would be no overall majority? Investors, like gamblers and football supporters, have a dangerous tendency towards optimism that can sometimes backfire on them. In the day or two before the election, and despite the polls still pointing to a hung parliament, that optimism led them to expect the outcome to be, if you like, better than expected. We now know that it was not. Parliament is jaw-droppingly well hung and nobody knows who will be occupying Number Ten in a week's time. What worries investors now is the possibility that the occupant might still be Gordon Brown, not because they dislike or distrust him but because his position has been hugely compromised. A hung parliament under the management of a new prime ministerial broom offers- realistically or not - the promise of change and progress. One led by a still-unelected incumbent and handicapped by the demands of a coalition partner simply means less of the same. The worry is that the 'less' in this case would be less determination to reduce the nation's debt and less commitment to making the 'difficult decisions' necessary to prevent the UK going the way of Greece. Had the result been a little more clear-cut, the pound would probably have come out of the election in better shape. It is not as if a hung parliament came as a surprise. But investors hate uncertainty. To be told that it may take ten days to form a coalition or minority government is one thing; to maintain enthusiasm for sterling throughout those ten days is quite another. It is conceivable that investors will take a shine to a new prime minister if one emerges from the horse-trading, and that they will renew their support for the pound. It is less easy to imagine them throwing their hats in the air for the old one. In the meantime, uncertainty is likely to gnaw away at sentiment towards the pound. The latest GBP/AUD exchange rate can be found here.
  17. hello, I'm an Australian journalist covering the local reaction to the upcoming UK election. Are you guys excited? Going to throw a paerty, get up early and watch it on cable TV or the internet? Did you vote - or have any problems voting? Any contributions welcome. Thanks
  18. Guest

    UK Election

    Dear All, My wife and I are voting by post for the first time since moving to Australia. We've registered with our home councils and have been told that the voting forms will be sent out on 27th April. With the time it takes to get post back and forth to Australia from Blighty, I really don't think our forms will arrive back in time for the election. To those that have voted via post before, did you find it a problem? We were a little naive when we registered and thought the councils would send postal votes out quite early to make sure they arrived back on time. With hindsight we should have registered to via proxy, next time. Sorry to ramble, but just thought I'd ask :smile: Cheers, Andy
  19. With the election called for 6th May, tonight sees the first ever live television debate between the Labour, Conservative and Liberal Democrat party leaders.
  20. Guest

    Vote in General Election

    If you are a Brit and you want to vote in the forthcoming General Election the go to this website to download the application forms. About My Vote, produced by The Electoral Commission You need to get on with it as you have to register by 20th April and post can take a week!
  21. Guest

    Election Day UK

    Election Day May 6th, Gordon has just dissolved Parliament!
  22. When is next election in Australia?I wish the labur partyand Chris Evans will be UNEMPLOYED!!:notworthy:
  23. Guest

    inoact of Oz Election Result?

    Hi All I must say that until today, I've never really followed Australian news and politics. Now I'm agog to find out what impact people think the new Labor Government will have. Cheers Gill
  24. THE MIGRANT WHO CHANGED THE TIDE OF THE FEDERAL ELECTION Mr. Bob Burgess, the would-be politician whose racist remarks have embarrassingly turned the tide against his own party in the Federal Election, is the same man who once came up with a radical answer to coconuts falling on the heads of picnickers in the parks of Cairns, where he is a city alderman. He suggested - seriously - that the Cairns City Council should employ trained monkeys to shin up the coconut trees and toss the nuts down to waiting council workers. Having had that idea ignored, bearded, British-born Bob has now handed thousands of potential votes to his delighted opposition Labor Party, calling Australian citizenship ceremonies ‘de-wogging’ events. In one stroke he introduced racism as an issue, hard on the heels of another British migrant, Labor’s own Graeme Campbell. Campbell’s outspoken views on multiculturalism earned him the sack by Labor’s Prime Minister Keating and now he is standing as an Independent. The National Party’s Burgess should - urges Keating - have the same fate, but so far he has had only a mild rebuke from his rather angry Leader. Burgess, who speaks in a cowboy drawl peppered with laughter, made things even worse by giving his opinions on handouts to Aboriginal and Islander communities. If funding was reduced, he said, the only organisations to suffer would be hotels, betting shops and Toyota. It earned him a public snub from Opposition Leader John Howard, who arrived in Burgess’s home-town, Cairns, and refused Bob Burgess’s outstretched hand. Howard went on to say: "He is not my candidate and won’t win the seat." Burgess was unfazed. (He claimed Coalition Leader Howard realised there was a "silent majority" of Australians who shared his views). As the National’s candidate for the sprawling seat of Leichhardt, Bob Burgess had gone on to talk to the travelling media caravan about women. He said he thought it was "rubbish" that women should have an equal share of seats in parliament just because they added up to 50% of the population. ‘What a load of absolute BS that is - the real men of Australia care about their women, they care about their issues and worries, they share their pain.’ I knew Bob Burgess as a young radio disc-jockey who worked hard for 13 years on tropical Cairns’ radio station 4CA, ("for twopence halfpenny" as he now says), peppering his shifts at the microphone with talk-back, his own sometimes zany opinions, studio interviews, poetry-reading and music, much of it country. He also plays the guitar, but not well, delights in passing on his homespun philosophy and often bemuses fellow city aldermen with his somewhat eccentric ideas to improve life in the city. If he gets into Parliament and has to quit the Cairns City Council, a dozen aspiring alderpersons are queuing for the required election in his Division. Bob says he is a deeply concerned Christian, but abhors the concept "born again". ‘I have been a committed Christian since the age of seven,’ he said to me. I wondered what it felt like to have turned the campaign - almost-single-handedly - against his own party? ‘Well of course it is a responsibility. But I don’t want to add any further fuel to the fire. I am happy to talk to you about the future of the Cape York Peninsula, its possibilities; and about the real issues in Australia. But any kind of profile about me is likely to have pieces taken out of it by other people and twisted to their own political agenda; that’s the way it is; that is part of the game." As if Burgess’s "de-wogging" jibe hadn’t done enough damage to the Opposition parties pushing to defeat Prime Minister Keating, a politician from their own camp then weighed in to defend him - and talked about "slanty-eyed ideologues" in the Green Movement. Bob Katter, National MP for Kennedy tried to explain later that his remark was a reference to zealots "whose eyes narrow and lips tighten", but even though he apologised, the double-whammy damage had been done. Bob Katter has also been dubbed as eccentric by his opponents, as a "loon" by others, and most commonly, a maverick. When he was in trouble with his leadership on another occasion he said "maverick" actually hurt him. ‘Most certainly. The leadership of the Liberal Party and the National Party have done their level best to paint me into that corner. They have used the term continuously to write me off. But I have very strong ideas on how the country needs to be - and must be - changed in direction.’ Racism is the last issue Opposition Leader Howard wanted to be raised in the campaign. He is still deeply sensitive about the damage caused when it exploded around his head once before; he has spent a decade trying to live down his comments on Asian migration; he had suggested it might need reducing.
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