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Found 59 results

  1. A Guide to Sending Money Overseas Hundreds of Poms in Oz members have benefited from using Moneycorp for their international money transfers. Moneycorp’s services are straightforward, simple to use and will save you money. The following text outlines the 4 step process and how it works. 1. Set up your Moneycorp account To start making money transfers, you will need to open an account with Moneycorp. This can be done online and only takes a few minutes - click here to register Opening an account carries no costs or obligations on your behalf. 2. Choose the best solution for your needs Once your Account is set up, your personal account manager will contact you to identify and discuss your specific requirements. They will be your personal point of contact for all future transactions and will explain the proposed course of action and options that best suits your personal needs. 3. Arrange your finances Once you have verbally agreed to a money transfer with your personal account manager, you will be sent a Contract Summary outlining the details. This document will include a form giving you instructions on how to transfer your funds to Moneycorp. The Contract Summary will also include a Transfer Instruction form, on which you will need to put details of the bank account(s) into which you would like your currency to be paid following your transaction. For further information regarding the different options when buying your currency, please click here 4. Payment methods You may use one of a variety of payment methods to send your funds to Moneycorp. Everything will be explained clearly by our staff and there is a dedicated customer service team who can help you with any questions you might have. Poms in Oz & Moneycorp Exclusively for PomsInOz members, you will not pay any transfer fees when sending your money overseas. Register with Moneycorp by clicking here For more information, call +44 (0)20 7589 3000, please remember to quote PomsInOz.
  2. Interested in potentially getting a better deal than your bank when sending money overseas? If so, you should consider using a foreign exchange specialist company when sending money to or from Australia. A specialist company, like Moneycorp, can offer you great exchange rates and free expert guidance on the Australian dollar to save you time and money when transferring money abroad. When using Moneycorp you can expect exchange rates that are typically up to 4% better than you would get from a high street bank - this can make a huge difference to your finances. Special offer - no transfer fees Your bank may charge you anything from £20 to £40 (or currency equivalent) to send your money to or from Australia. Moneycorp don’t charge commission and exclusively for Poms in Oz members all transfer fees are waived – so you can save money on transfer fees alone. How can I register for a free Moneycorp account? Thousands of forum members have saved money by using Moneycorp. It’s simple to register for a free account and the process only takes a few minutes – click here to register online with Moneycorp.
  3. [img2=right]http://www.pomsinoz.com/images/moneycorp468x300.jpg[/img2]John Kinghorn from the foreign exchange expert's moneycorp, is hosting a special UK election live chat session with forum members on Thursday 16th April (7:30pm until 9:30pm, UK time). The UK General Election takes place in May 2015 and with current opinion polls predicting a tight result, uncertainty beckons ahead of and after the election, which could in turn impact the sterling/Australian dollar exchange rate. Therefore, this summer's election result is an important factor to consider if you are transferring money to or from Australia. About John from moneycorp John Kinghorn is Head of UK Private Partnerships at moneycorp. With over 10 years’ experience in the migration industry, John regularly speaks at seminars on the subject and can also help you with other aspects of your move to Australia. When transferring money to or from Australia, moneycorp can typically offer you better exchange rates than your bank – often up to 4% better, saving you money. As an exclusive offer for forum members, all transfer fees are free when sending money overseas. Visit the Poms in Oz currency homepage for more information -http://moneytransfer.pomsinoz.com/ How to participate in the live chat session If you have an account on Pomsinoz, login, then click on the 'chat' menu option at the top of the page. Clicking on chat will launch the chat software. There enter the 'Moneycorp' room. If you don't have an account of Pomsinoz, you can still participate by by following this link - UK election live chat session, then, once the chat software has loaded, tick the 'Guest' option at the top of the chat window, then choose a username and click 'Login' and enter the Moneycorp chat room. NB: If you have a device which doesn't use Flash eg: iPhone or iPad, you can join us in the chat via this link or by downloading the free 123Flashchat app from the Apps Store via this link and entering 921 as the chat ID.
  4. THE Australian dollar has fallen and is trading within a tight range awaiting news on Greece's debt resolution. At 1200 AEDT today, the local currency was trading at 107.84. From 0700 AEDT, the Australian dollar has traded between 107.91 US cents and 108.08 cents. On Tuesday, the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) surprised the market by announcing it would keep the official interest rate on hold, despite predictions of a 25-basis-point cut. The RBA's decision prompted the Aussie dollar to rise to 108.12 US cents, its highest point since August. Nomura head of foreign exchange Kurt Magnus said the market was looking to Europe to guide its next movements. "The situation yesterday with the RBA's decision was a shock to the market, and it's seen the Australian dollar stall in a higher range,'' he said. "Today, it's quiet in anticipation of news out of Greece tonight. "Obviously, positive news will see the Australian dollar climb towards those July highs (of 110 US cents) from last year. "Negative news will see the Aussie test the bottom end of the range very rapidly.'' Overnight, a planned austerity meeting in Greece did not go ahead, increasing doubts that the process to resolve the country's debt problem was stalling yet again. Mr Magnus said if the Greek bailout didn't succeed, it would have a notable impact on the Australian dollar's relationship to both the Euro and the US dollar. In the latter case, Mr Magnus said, the Aussie could fall back below its current support of 107.30 US cents. Meanwhile, Australian bond future prices were lower at noon. At 1200 AEDT on Wednesday, the March 10-year bond futures contract was trading at 96.000 (implying a yield of 4.000 per cent), down from 96.015 (3.985 per cent) on Tuesday. The March three-year bond futures contract was at 96.510 (3.490 per cent), down from 96.530 (3.470 per cent).
  5. A Guide to Sending Money Overseas Hundreds of Poms in Oz members have benefited from using Moneycorp for their international money transfers. Moneycorp’s services are straightforward, simple to use and will save you money. The following text outlines the 4 step process and how it works. 1. Set up your Moneycorp account To start making money transfers, you will need to open an account with Moneycorp. This can be done online and only takes a few minutes - click here to register Opening an account carries no costs or obligations on your behalf. 2. Choose the best solution for your needs Once your Account is set up, your personal account manager will contact you to identify and discuss your specific requirements. They will be your personal point of contact for all future transactions and will explain the proposed course of action and options that best suits your personal needs. 3. Arrange your finances Once you have verbally agreed to a money transfer with your personal account manager, you will be sent a Contract Summary outlining the details. This document will include a form giving you instructions on how to transfer your funds to Moneycorp. The Contract Summary will also include a Transfer Instruction form, on which you will need to put details of the bank account(s) into which you would like your currency to be paid following your transaction. For further information regarding the different options when buying your currency, please click here 4. Payment methods You may use one of a variety of payment methods to send your funds to Moneycorp. Everything will be explained clearly by our staff and there is a dedicated customer service team who can help you with any questions you might have. Poms in Oz & Moneycorp Exclusively for PomsInOz members, you will not pay any transfer fees when sending your money overseas. Register with Moneycorp by clicking here For more information, call +44 (0)20 7589 3000, please remember to quote PomsInOz.
  6. Here is a thread for all the currency experts on PIO. Have a think about your pick for the exchange rate for 1 GBP to the AUD by end of 2011. Will it go up or down ? The closest may even get a prize. The BBC site will be used as the official reference. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business/market_data/currency/11/15/three_month.stm
  7. 'Our Currency lads and lasses are a fine interesting race, and do honour to the country whence they originated. The name is a sufficient passport to esteem with all the well-informed and right-feeling portion of our population; but it is most laughable to see the capers some of our drunken old Sterling madonnas will occasionally cut over their Currency adversaries in a quarrel. It is then, 'You saucy baggage, how dare you set up your Currency crest at me? I am Sterling, and that I'll let you know!' In 19th century Australia the distinction between native-born Australians and migrants was played out lexically as a battle between currency and sterling. In the early days of the colony there were coins and notes of many kinds, from various countries. These were called currency, whereas English gold pieces were called sterling - sterling being the genuine thing in sharp contradistinction to the mixty-maxty mongrel currency. By the 1820s these two terms had widened their application and were being used to describe two groups of people in the colony. Currency applied to those native to Australia, that is, those born here. Sterling referred to non-convict, British-born residents. These native-born currency lads and lasses began to speak a new language. Outsiders comment on their accent and the 'colonial phraseology'. Some of this colonial language was borrowed from Aboriginal languages, and some of it was generated internally. The irony is that many of the expressions which are contemptuously categorised as 'colonial' are in fact English. But they are not sterling English, not the language of the now respectable London or polite society. These Australian words are a mongrel breed, some of them are underworld terms, and many are words from British dialects, which remained dialectal in Britain, but which became mainstream in Australian English. There developed here a language that was in subversive opposition to the now-emerging Received British English. Shifts in the meaning of standard English words - 'mate' is a good example - reflected Australian social ideals which differed from the British
  8. Hi Guys, I am in the process of transferring my money to my Australian account. I have been looking at the various options such as Moneycorp that is advertised on this forum but the one that is the most interesting (because it seems to offer the best rates) is http://www.currencyfair.com. I just wanted to know if anyone else here had used it and how they found it? P.S. I wish I transferred my money a few months ago! The pound's value is shocking!
  9. Moving to Australia is a big decision. And no doubt you will want to start your new life with as much money as possible. One of the main factors affecting the amount of money you actually start out with is how you choose to exchange your funds into Aussie dollars. That’s where Moneycorp can help. Currency markets are constantly fluctuating, but their experts can monitor them for you, helping you trade at the right time, in the right way – when rates are in your favour. As a result, you’ll get more dollars for your pounds. Timing is key It’s important to plan ahead to give yourself an opportunity to take advantage of any favourable exchange rate movements. Leaving your currency transfers to the last minute can cost you more than you might think. If you were transferring £50,000 into Australian dollars on the dates below, you would have received the following: 17 March 2011 A$82,235 12 May 2011 A$77,185 That’s a difference of A$5,050 (or £3,310) in just over two months! How Moneycorp can help As a foreign exchange and international money transfer specialist, getting the best rates of exchange for their customers is what Moneycorp is all about. Plus, for Poms in Oz members, all transfer fees will be waived. Their expert dealers provide information and guidance on the currency markets, helping you decide on the best time to buy your Australian dollars. Regardless of the size of the transfer you need to make, Moneycorp will keep the process quick, cost-effective and hassle-free. Moneycorp has direct access to special interbank rates, which means they can offer you highly competitive deals – often beating highstreet bank rates by more than 3%. Register with Moneycorp You can open a free, no-obligation Account with Moneycorp by clicking here. Alternatively, you can call them on +44 (0)20 7589 3000. Please remember to quote Poms in Oz when you get in touch. In safe hands Moneycorp has been trading foreign currencies for over 30 years and has an unrivalled reputation within the industry. They utilise the most secure payment systems and are authorised and regulated by the Financial Services Authority (FSA) for the conduct of designated investment business and the provision of payment services. Click here for more information.
  10. Hi. The rate of exchange is disastrous at the moment. Does anyone know the implications of transfering GBP from UK bank to OZ bank upon departure for permanent migration but not converting GBP into A$ for 1 year? Has anyone taken this decision? Thanks. Nick
  11. Hi folks, We are off on our hols soon - first time outside of Oz since we got here. Can anyone recommend a good bank/foreign currency place to get our holiday money with low fees and good rates? Oz is not like the Uk chargingt 2 pound 50 to change money. When I got to Oz i got stung by ANZ charging me $8 to change 20 quid - robbing buggers!
  12. I went to transfer some money today to OZ and was SHOCKED with the rate!. Its been going down and down and at this stage I am not sure if I should sent the whole lot now or wait a few more weeks... :mad: Look at the graphs below, the rates are the worst in the last 10 years! :cry: Cheers B!K3R
  13. Hi Just wanted to check - my hubby and I are off to the UK for Christmas and I don't know what will be the best exchange rate for us. should we just use our AUD$ and exchange over here or there? Am I right in thinking it would be of no advantage to use my £'s savings whilst in the UK? thanks Smiler
  14. I'm just wondering if any of you out there have made the big move in the last 6 months with the currency being so bad?? We're due to go September and am praying to the Gods that it goes back up....:cry:
  15. Get your thinking caps on chaps.... :cry: It seems as though the pressure on China to revalue the Yuan is now reaching critical mass. The US, the EU and now Japan are all demanding the Chinese government allows the currency to rise in value. This will, of course, make Chinese goods more expensive , less attractive and give them less purchasing power and hence will slow down their economy. In turn, this would have a negative effect on the AUD as the construction sector in China gets hit. Whilst China holds a wad of US treasury bonds, Euros and Yen do they have enough power to dictate to the world that they can do what they want with their own currency? Or will this lead to protectionist strategies as other countries block Chinese goods or tax them out of pole position in our shops?
  16. Hi All Just a reminder about the live chat today (and by live chat no you don't need to talk just type away) they have 3 of the experts coming in to the Pomsinoz chat room to advise and answer any questions you have on getting the best exchange rate, where to bank and how to set up an account and also what you can and can't ship, how long shipping takes and a rough guide to cost. I think it is a great opportunity to ask all the questions that you have regarding the move and get an instant reply. Kate
  17. Sterling set off on a belated honeymoon to celebrate its ménage-à-trois with David Cameron and Nick Clegg. Financial markets' first reactions to the Lib/Con coalition were positive, with the pound adding a cent or more across the board. Earlier in the day, perhaps in anticipation of the only sensible political mash-up, the Treasury successfully had auctioned £2.5 billion 17-year gilts. Investors bid for £6 billion in total, leaving no suggestion of concern about Britain's creditworthiness. After six months of fretfulness about a hung parliament investors must now live with the reality. Less than 24 hours into the exercise there is not much for them to see but they are impatient to know how the new government will attack the deficit problem. The lesson from Greece is that procrastination leads to disaster. The warning from the left is that haste would precipitate another recession. But the evidence is all around to show that the confidence of financial markets is critical to the process of government. But what was widely reviewed as a sterling relief rally, this morning, ran out of steam once the Bank of England's May inflation report was published, while some experts warned it was too early to say whether the new coalition would lead to a more pronounced sterling rally. Dave, Nick and George have one chance to get it right. Never mind proportional representation or tuition fees or ID cards or immigration; as Bill Clinton's election campaign had it, the overriding issue at the moment is 'The economy, stupid'.
  18. Just a quick reminder that we are currently holding a live chat session with Moneycorp, which will run until aprox. 21:30 UK time. To take part, click the 'chat' button at the top of the page (in the orange menu bar) or use this link - Moneycorp Chat Once the chat software has loaded, enter the 'Moneycorp' chat room. (If you're a guest on the website, when the chat window loads, click the green icon next to where it says Unregistered ( available) - then choose 'Edit your profile' and choose a nickname first.) John Kinghorn and Jonathan Griffith from Moneycorp are hosting the chat and will be on hand to answer and exchange rate / money transfer queries you may have The session will will last approximately 2 hours. Whether you are moving to Australia, or living there already, John will provide the latest updates on the Aussie dollar and give you some insight into the key influencing factors. Exchange rates are constantly fluctuating and transferring your money at the right time, via the right channel, will make a big difference.
  19. We are emigrating next year and are undecided whether or not to use a currency broker or just go with international banking. I have looked into HiFX and they also offer reduced prices on flights and shipping but are they reliable? Did anyone use any brokers they could recommend or have any bad experiences? Any advice would be much appreciated as I don't want to put our savings at risk. Thanks Francine
  20. Hi All at POI We are due to go on a reccie to WA in the next few weeks and wondered if you could help with our dilemma. We have looked into the currency card option for our travel money and Travelex do not charge for cash withdrawals at ATM's but the card is a Visa Electron and I wondered how widely accepted this card is in shops, restaurants etc. In the UK it's not the most commonly used type of debit card. We will bring cash as well as a regular credit card but some advice regarding the acceptance would be appreciated. Our other option was traveller's cheques but that would mean visits to the banks to cash them rather than just a visit to the ATM. Can't wait to get to Perth and some sunshine!!!
  21. Weekly currency update from Moneycorp [moneycorp]10168283[/moneycorp]
  22. Weekly currency update from Moneycorp [moneycorp]10168283[/moneycorp]
  23. G'day all, Just wanted to post to say we have just used these guys are they are FAB!!! This is not a sales pitch we are moving down under this year so thought we would send £10k to start with to see how long it takes etc. We done the deal last Friday and paid the same day and the funds are now cleared in our Wespac account - HOW QUICK!! Long and short is any funds transfer over £3k is fee free and quick!! When we opened the account they called me to check all was well and explained how it works etc and have kept in touch. We are VERY impressed and will definetly use to send the rest of our funds over to Oz If you want to check them out for yourselves go to www.currencyonline.com Good luck Hydie
  24. Currency Online – Moving Money Made Easy Hi there, The UK pound had a relatively unspectacular week against the Australian dollar. The pound did manage to lose a bit of ground against the Aussie early in the week, as some fairly flat to negative data out of the US had markets questioning the speed of the global recovery and growth sensitive currencies like the Aussie dollar declined. Appetite for the “safe haven” US dollar weighed on both the GBP and AUD. Retail sales and CPI data out of the UK last week were pretty much as the markets expected and did little to stimulate UK pound demand. As for this week, a heap of data out this week for the markets to get their teeth around, including UK GDP for Q3. This week’s focus will be on data results and this will govern direction for the short term. Good data is good for market sentiment, which in turn is positive for both the Aussie dollar and UK pound against the US dollar. Aussie dollar strengthens (usually!) against the pound when the markets are positive. GBP/AUD High’s & Low’s (Bid) of last week; High: 1.8110 Low: 1.7880 GBP/AUD Expected Range for the Week: High: 1.8250 Low: 1.7725 Click here to view GBP/AUD historical charts Remember – it’s not about guessing as to which way the rate will move, it’s about managing your needs depending on your propensity for risk and your timeframe. Talk to your currency provider today about how to best manage your currency needs. What is a Spot Contract? Click here How can a Forward Contract help you?Click here How can a Market Order help you? Click here Kind regards, Jon Speedy Currency Online – Moving Money Made Easy
  25. Currency Online – Moving Money Made Easy Hi there, The Pound had a bit of a roller-coaster week. To its credit, the pound did recover after a mid-week dive which saw the GBP/AUD cross dip to as low as 1.78. Both currencies are currently benefiting from a weaker US dollar which continues to get slammed. Positive data showing there are signs of a global recovery has been bad news for the greenback. The ‘safe-haven’ appeal of the US currency is becoming less and less. As for this week – there is a bit of important data due out of the UK this week, including CPI data and Retail Sales. If these figures come out positive - and there is every possibility they will - you could see the UK pound continue to recover. “Hooray” I hear you say! GBP/AUD High’s & Low’s (Bid) of last week; High: 1.8090 Low: 1.7810 GBP/AUD Expected Range for the Week: High: 1.8300 Low: 1.7850 Click here to view GBP/AUD historical charts Remember – it’s not about guessing as to which way the rate will move, it’s about managing your needs depending on your propensity for risk and your timeframe. Talk to your currency provider today about how to best manage your currency needs. What is a Spot Contract? Click here What is a Forward Contract?Click here What is a Market Order? Click here Kind regards, Jon Speedy Currency Online – Moving Money Made Easy