Jump to content

You're currently viewing the forum as a Guest
register-now-button_orig.png
and join in with discussions   
ask migration questions
message other members

..and much much more!

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'australian dollar'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Moving to Australia
    • Visa Chat
    • Skilled Visas
    • Family / Partner Visas
    • Temporary Visas
    • Business Skills Visas
    • Business Sponsored
    • Working Holiday Visas
    • Shipping and Removals
  • Life in Australia
    • Aussie Chat
    • Household
    • Renting & Real Estate
    • Money & Finance
    • Education
    • Health
    • Careers and Vacancies
    • Kids Down Under
    • Pets
    • Socialising Hobbies Clubs Sport
    • Travel
  • Australian States & Territories
    • ACT
    • New South Wales
    • Northern Territory
    • Queensland
    • South Australia
    • Tasmania
    • Victoria
    • Western Australia
  • Partner Forums
    • Money Transfer: Ask Moneycorp
    • Financial Advice: Ask Vista
    • Shipping Pets: Ask Pet Air
    • Talking Tax: Ask Alan
  • Moving to the UK
    • UK Chat
    • Education
    • Where to Live?
    • Money and Finance
  • PomsInOz Specific
    • Chewing the fat

    Categories

    • Migration
    • Living in Australia
    • Jobs and Careers
    • Moving to Australia Real Life Stories
    • Money and Finance
    • Transport
    • Where to live in Australia?
      • Victoria
      • Queensland
      • New South Wales
      • Tasmania
      • Western Australia
      • South Australia
    • Backpacking
    • News
    • Forum Help

    Blogs

    There are no results to display.

    There are no results to display.


    Find results in...

    Find results that contain...


    Date Created

    • Start

      End


    Last Updated

    • Start

      End


    Filter by number of...

    Joined

    • Start

      End


    Group


    Found 12 results

    1. I have received many messages recently on the pound against the Australian dollar – below is further information on what could shape the exchange rate over the next few months. For GBP/AUD, the trend is currently towards a weaker Aussie dollar. The exchange rate, in the short term and what will happen next, is currently dependent mainly on the following factors: Eurozone situation – The Greek situation in particular causing investors to shun high yielding ‘riskier’ assets, which has proved to be negative for the Aussie dollar. The British pound on the other hand has benefitted from a relative safe haven status having retained its AAA credit rating, resulting in a flight away from the beleaguered Euro and into sterling and UK Government bonds, resulting in a higher GBP/AUD$ rate of exchange which means it is better for those converting their pounds into Aussie dollars) – if the Eurozone situation continues to deteriorate, this is likely to further weaken the Aussie dollar. Interest rates - Having seen the Reserve Bank of Australia cut its interest rate from 4.25% to 3.75% in April, the high yield advantage is now being eroded. Australia’s Prime Minister Julia Gillard has also recently stated that her government will return the budget to a surplus during the next fiscal year providing scope to adjust interest rates. Some analysts are predicting another interest rate cut in Australia soon, maybe as early as June, which again could be negative for the Australian dollar. China - Australia’s largest trade partner China has seen a considerable slowdown in economic growth recently with the most latest GDP reading down to 8.1% annualised from the previous result of 8.9% in the final quarter of 2011. Their decline in growth rate will undoubtedly dampen their previously insatiable demands for Australia’s natural resources. Considering that the Australian economy has been driven by its mining boom, the recent RBA decision to cut has been well received with the aim to help stimulate some form of domestic growth. Any data released in the Australia and the UK, of course, could have an impact on the exchange rate – much is dependent on what happens in these factors above in relation to the exchange rate over the next few months. Thanks John
    2. Great exchange rates with moneycorp Are you transferring money to or from Australia? If so then get great exchange rates with moneycorp – plus, as a special offer for Poms in Oz forum members, there will be no transfer fee charges. High street banks can typically charge £10-£40 in transfer fees when making an international payment. See the table below for an illustration on the potential savings you could make by using moneycorp. *based on an exchange rate comparison taken on 1st January 2018 between Lloyds, HSBC, Natwest and moneycorp. Please note that there are additional costs with the service, the high-street banks typically charge £10-£40. Get started with moneycorp and start saving money – https://www.moneycorp.com/uk/campaigns/partners/pio/ Moneycorp is a reference to TTT Moneycorp Pty Limited which is registered in Australia (business number 116612858). Its principal place of business is Level 15 Exchange Tower, 2 The Esplanade, Perth WA 6000, Australia. TTT Moneycorp Pty Limited is authorised to deal in foreign exchange contracts and buy/sell quotes to retail and wholesale clients as an Authorised Representative (reference number 445555) of Rochford Capital Pty Limited (AFSL License No. 361276).
    3. John from Moneycorp

      Great exchange rates with moneycorp

      Great exchange rates with moneycorp Are you transferring money to or from Australia? If so then get great exchange rates with moneycorp – plus, as a special offer for Poms in Oz forum members, there will be no transfer fee charges. High street banks can typically charge £10-£40 in transfer fees when making an international payment. See the table below for an illustration on the potential savings you could make by using moneycorp. *based on an exchange rate comparison taken on 1st January 2018 between Lloyds, HSBC, Natwest and moneycorp. Please note that there are additional costs with the service, the high-street banks typically charge £10-£40. Get started with moneycorp and start saving money – https://www.moneycorp.com/uk/campaigns/partners/pio/ Moneycorp is a reference to TTT Moneycorp Pty Limited which is registered in Australia (business number 116612858). Its principal place of business is Level 15 Exchange Tower, 2 The Esplanade, Perth WA 6000, Australia. TTT Moneycorp Pty Limited is authorised to deal in foreign exchange contracts and buy/sell quotes to retail and wholesale clients as an Authorised Representative (reference number 445555) of Rochford Capital Pty Limited (AFSL License No. 361276).
    4. By John Kinghorn from Moneycorp Moving to Australia is a big decision. And no doubt you will want to start your new life with as much money as possible. One of the main factors affecting the amount of money you actually start out with is how you choose to exchange your pounds into Australian dollars (or pounds into dollars if sending money back home to the UK). That’s where moneycorp can assist - below are some top tips to help you get the most for your money. Using your bank? Many people leave their foreign exchange in the hands of their bank. Most are unaware that there are other options available to save money. Banks typically won’t offer you as competitive an exchange rate compared with what moneycorp can offer you. The difference in the rate can be up to 4%, meaning you get more Australian dollars for your pounds. Personal service Using a currency specialist company means you can transfer money overseas with the help of your own Account Manager. They will help you transfer money at the right time, in the right way – for example, when rates are more favourable. Your dealer will work closely with you to manage your currency risks. Plan ahead The longer you have to arrange your currency transfer, the more flexibility you will have to ensure you get the best deal and exchange rate. Special offer for forum members No transfer fees if you register through Poms in Oz – banks can charge up to £40 every time you send money overseas therefore you can save money on fees alone. Next steps Interested in saving money on your overseas currency transfers? Well, it is free and there is no obligation to register for a moneycorp account. Once registered, you will have an Account Manager who can provide live quotes as and when you need them, plus they will go through your requirements in detail. They will also provide information and guidance on the Pound/Australian dollar exchange rate Register with moneycorp by clicking here. Make an enquiry or ask a question by clicking here.
    5. [img2=right]http://www.pomsinoz.com/images/moneycorp468x300.jpg[/img2]John Kinghorn from the foreign exchange expert's moneycorp, is hosting a special UK election live chat session with forum members on Thursday 16th April (7:30pm until 9:30pm, UK time). The UK General Election takes place in May 2015 and with current opinion polls predicting a tight result, uncertainty beckons ahead of and after the election, which could in turn impact the sterling/Australian dollar exchange rate. Therefore, this summer's election result is an important factor to consider if you are transferring money to or from Australia. About John from moneycorp John Kinghorn is Head of UK Private Partnerships at moneycorp. With over 10 years’ experience in the migration industry, John regularly speaks at seminars on the subject and can also help you with other aspects of your move to Australia. When transferring money to or from Australia, moneycorp can typically offer you better exchange rates than your bank – often up to 4% better, saving you money. As an exclusive offer for forum members, all transfer fees are free when sending money overseas. Visit the Poms in Oz currency homepage for more information -http://moneytransfer.pomsinoz.com/ How to participate in the live chat session If you have an account on Pomsinoz, login, then click on the 'chat' menu option at the top of the page. Clicking on chat will launch the chat software. There enter the 'Moneycorp' room. If you don't have an account of Pomsinoz, you can still participate by by following this link - UK election live chat session, then, once the chat software has loaded, tick the 'Guest' option at the top of the chat window, then choose a username and click 'Login' and enter the Moneycorp chat room. NB: If you have a device which doesn't use Flash eg: iPhone or iPad, you can join us in the chat via this link or by downloading the free 123Flashchat app from the Apps Store via this link and entering 921 as the chat ID.
    6. Hi everyone, Looking for some advice/discussion... We are back in the uk and have a fair amount of aud to transfer back. We joined Moneycorp recently but are not sure when to do the transfer. The exchange rate is pretty rubbish compared to say early 2013... is there any chance of it returning to those levels or should we get out now? I've been reading a lot about the current climate and it seems like it's not so great at the moment, and there is a key RBA (?) meeting next week which could impact the value of the dollar. I'm not really that clued up on all this stuff, just wondering if anyone with more knowledge could give me their opinion? many thanks!
    7. Hey everyone, We have been watching the falling dollar recently and are keen to move our savings back into pounds. They have already lost a bit of value and we are watching it drop further We recently left Aus and see now how the country appears to be slipping a little further into recession/something like that. We are quite inexperienced with all this type of stuff and are not sure whether to wait, or just move it now before it drops more. What should we look out for as warning signs/positive signs? Anyone else thinking similar thoughts? Interested in people's experiences!
    8. THE Australian dollar has fallen and is trading within a tight range awaiting news on Greece's debt resolution. At 1200 AEDT today, the local currency was trading at 107.84. From 0700 AEDT, the Australian dollar has traded between 107.91 US cents and 108.08 cents. On Tuesday, the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) surprised the market by announcing it would keep the official interest rate on hold, despite predictions of a 25-basis-point cut. The RBA's decision prompted the Aussie dollar to rise to 108.12 US cents, its highest point since August. Nomura head of foreign exchange Kurt Magnus said the market was looking to Europe to guide its next movements. "The situation yesterday with the RBA's decision was a shock to the market, and it's seen the Australian dollar stall in a higher range,'' he said. "Today, it's quiet in anticipation of news out of Greece tonight. "Obviously, positive news will see the Australian dollar climb towards those July highs (of 110 US cents) from last year. "Negative news will see the Aussie test the bottom end of the range very rapidly.'' Overnight, a planned austerity meeting in Greece did not go ahead, increasing doubts that the process to resolve the country's debt problem was stalling yet again. Mr Magnus said if the Greek bailout didn't succeed, it would have a notable impact on the Australian dollar's relationship to both the Euro and the US dollar. In the latter case, Mr Magnus said, the Aussie could fall back below its current support of 107.30 US cents. Meanwhile, Australian bond future prices were lower at noon. At 1200 AEDT on Wednesday, the March 10-year bond futures contract was trading at 96.000 (implying a yield of 4.000 per cent), down from 96.015 (3.985 per cent) on Tuesday. The March three-year bond futures contract was at 96.510 (3.490 per cent), down from 96.530 (3.470 per cent).
    9. [WRAP]http://www.pomsinoz.com/images/Holiday.png[/WRAP]The strength of the Australian Dollar over the past few months has enabled a record number of Australians to travel overseas, according to the Expedia NAB Travellers Foreign Currency Rankings. Although the strength of the Aussie dollar has been tempered in the past couple of weeks, the latest Australian Bureau of Statistics figures show overseas departures are close to record highs and had increased by 10 per cent in the seven months to July, compared with the same period last year. Marketing manager of Expedia, Amee Evans said Australian travellers were taking advantage of the strong dollar. "It's a very exciting time to be an Aussie travelling overseas because our currency is at near-record highs against, not just the US Dollar, but many of the world's major and minor currencies," she said. The Expedia NAB travellers' Foreign Currency rankings compared the Australian Dollar against the world's currencies over a 12-month period and the results revealed the 10 best value destinations for Australian travellers. BEST VALUE DESTINATIONS At number one for best value was Turkey, where the Australian Dollar has rose 22% against the Turkish Lira. Also high on the list for best value were the Tanzanian Shilling and the Argentine Peso which rose by 18% and 14% respectively. Australians wanting a tropical break have done well with Asia featuring strongly in the results. Vietnam and Thailand ranked third and fifth on the list while the Australian dollar grew by 16% against the Vietnamese Dong, 12% against the Thai Baht and 11% against the Hong Kong Dollar. The lowest gain for South East Asia was in Singapore where the Australian Dollar grew by just 3%. As a result of the strong dollar expedia searches for travel in Thailand were up by 73% and searches for travel in Vietnam have rose by 66%. The Australian Dollar had risen 10 per cent against the US Dollar in the last 12 months and although a continual favourite for Australian travellers it has only just scraped in to the top 10 list for best value. Despite not being the best for value a 44% increase has occurred for bookings to the USA. The most popular destinations were Honolulu, New York and Los Angeles. The report showed the Australian Dollar appreciating by 8% against the British Pound and 4% against the Euro but bookings through Expedia.com.au continued to rise for popular destinations London, Rome and Paris. In the past 12 months the Australian Dollar has lost 5% against the Swiss Franc and 2% against the New Zealand Dollar. Currency Strategist at National Australia Bank Emma Lawson said the resources boom and high commodity prices had benefit for the Australian Dollar. "The Australian Dollar has outperformed in the year as it benefits from the ongoing resource boom and high commodity prices. More recently it has been a little more volatile but we expect it to remain relatively strong across a broad range of currencies due to Australia's AAA status, and continued support from the resources sector," she said.
    10. [img2=right]http://www.pomsinoz.com/forum/../images/moneycorp-graph-pio.png[/img2] Australian dollar – review from Moneycorp Following the spike in autumn 2008, which took it to a five-year high at $2.70, sterling spent two years on the retreat, losing more than half its peak value in the process. It bottomed out at $1.51 in late December, an all-time low, rebounding to $1.60 in early January. Since then it has gone nowhere. For eight weeks the pound has inhabited a five-cent-wide channel between $1.5750 and $1.6250, moving up and down through the $1.60 midpoint two or three times a week. There is no particular reason for the Aussie's temporarily high correlation with sterling. If anything, the dollar should still be making hay while the sun shines on its 4.75% Cash Rate as it snows on the pound's 0.5% Bank Rate. The two currencies are subject to different pressures even apart from the interest rate differential. The UK economy is heavily dependent on the contribution from financial services, a sector that was hard-hit by the crisis and precipitated the recession. Australia's mining and agricultural sectors are big exporters of products for which there has been consistent demand from, among others, China. That steady flow of exports helped Australia to avoid recession entirely. Britain's economy grew by 1.5% in 2010 while growth in Australia pushed ahead by 2.7%. Investors are under no compulsion to keep currencies on the move, even though that is what they usually do. With the goings-on in Egypt, Libya and the Gulf they see no reason to send GBP/AUD one way or the other, hence this temporary stability in the exchange rate. But that it what it is likely to be; temporary. The next chapter For more than twenty years the pound spent the vast majority of its time wandering between $2 and $3. Against that background the Australian dollar's current strength could be a fluke, soon to be corrected. It could also reflect a fundamental change in the world order. The pain felt by Britain's economy is far from over. Negative growth in the fourth quarter of 2010 was a reminder that there is no simple choice between forward and reverse for an economy. America has shown that growth does not necessarily bring more jobs and greater spending power. UK government spending cuts and tax increases will be felt more deeply as the months go by and it will be years before things get back to "normal". House prices are stagnant and there is a yawning gulf between bid and offer. The indices from Halifax, Nationwide and the Land Registry that plot transaction prices show an average property changing hands at £162,854. The one from Rightmove that plots asking prices shows sellers asking £233,121 for that same average house. Another problem is the inflation that eats further into people's spending power. At 4% it is twice as high as it should be. Without January's VAT increase and high oil and food prices inflation would be fairly close to its 2% target but that's like saying without all this rain we would be able to sunbathe. It looks as though the Bank of England is beginning to lean towards an interest rate increase, if only to prove to the world that it is not asleep on the job. That prospect is helping the pound. The Australian dollar has already done that legwork. With no recession to worry about the Reserve Bank of Australia has raised its cash rate from 3% to 4.75% over the last 18 months. The rate could go higher still in the second half of this year. There has been no fall in house prices either, despite warnings of a bubble. The Economist said recently that Australian house prices are the most inflated in the world, 56% above fair value. It is not a new argument but it does make you wonder whether the 5.8% increase in 2010 reported by the Australian Bureau of Statistics will be repeated in 2011. The other bubble faced by the Australian economy and the dollar is the one inflating in Southeast Asia. Beijing has so far been reluctant to lean too heavily on the rising commodity and asset prices that are fuelling inflation there but analysts worry that the longer the authorities do nothing, the bigger the problem they lay in store. If demand from China were to slow sharply it would dampen appetite for the Australian dollar and other commodity-related currencies. Summary After more than two months steady around $1.60 the only reason to expect the GBP/AUD exchange rate to move is because it cannot remain static forever. Still close to its all-time highs against the US dollar, the euro, the yen and the pound the Aussie is undoubtedly overvalued. That suggests the next move for sterling will be upward but it does not indicate when, nor does it prevent the Aussie becoming even more overvalued in the meantime. Click here for more information on the Australian dollar and receiving the best exchange rates.
    11. Weekly currency update from Moneycorp [moneycorp]10168283[/moneycorp]
    ×