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Marisawright

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Everything posted by Marisawright

  1. Marisawright

    Border opening now mid 2022

    My thoughts exactly. But there does seem to be a new class of migrants who think nothing of flying back to the UK every year. Maybe it's part of an overall change in how overseas holidays are viewed nowadays, almost as essentials rather than luxuries. I was surprised by how many ordinary wage-earners in the UK have two overseas holidays a year, which (even if they're doing it cheaply), means they're spending a few thousand pounds on holidays every year. So if they migrate to Australia, they use that same money to fly home and then they get cheap accommodation with the folks, and it's no different. A far cry from when I was growing up and holidays was a fortnight in a caravan at Arisaig!
  2. Marisawright

    Australian and UK Covid Responses

    That's depressing. I have heard it said that the vaccine isn't fully effective until later than that?
  3. Marisawright

    I know no one will care but...........

    Well, I learned something. I realise I don't know any naval officers so I guess that's why I never came across it. Interestingly, I Googled and couldn't find any authoritative sources to confirm the difference, but I did find this explanation: In the British Army the pronunciation is as you indicate, [leftenənt], or some close variant thereof. This I believe is also the case for civil administrators such as Lords Lieutenant of shires and the Lord Lieutenant of the Tower of London. It is also true of the Royal Air Force, the rank next above Flying Officer and next below a Squadron Leader is Flight Lieutenant, which Ive always heard pronounced with the army [f], even though the RAF officers ranks are rather more like unto those of the Royal and United States Navies than the British or United States Army. But in the Royal Navy, there is a different dialect -- in the following ranks or offices, Sublieutenant, Lieutenant, Ship's First lieutenant, Lieutenant-Commander, Flag Lieutenant, the pronunciation is always [letenənt] or something along that line -- not quite the [lu--] or [[l'u--] of the United States.
  4. Marisawright

    I know no one will care but...........

    Is that the Australian navy you’re talking about?
  5. For a partner wishing to enter Australia with an Australian citizen, I believe not
  6. Marisawright

    190 visa processing times extended

    Yes, an agent posted that information just recently. Was that always the case though?
  7. If you applied for a visitor visa without applying for a travel exemption, it will just sit in the system and never be approved. You can try applying for the travel exemption now, and you must quote the reference number from your visa application.
  8. Marisawright

    I know no one will care but...........

    Tell her to insist on a referral to a plastic surgeon, not a general surgeon. Some people think you just get a general surgeon to do the excision and then get plastic surgery to fix up the damage. That never works. A plastic surgeon can remove the cancer just as effectively but will do it in a way that minimizes damage. My husband had a melanoma which required the removal of a large part of his nose. The plastic surgeon did an amazing job. He used skin from his leg and a big chunk from behind his ear to reconstruct his nose. My husband and I can both see where the join is, but most people don't even notice. And he's all clear (fingers crossed).
  9. Marisawright

    I know no one will care but...........

    Interesting. In the UK, I'm pretty sure it's "LEFTenant" everywhere (or more accurately, LifTENant) and LOOtenant is regarded as a vulgar Americanism.
  10. Marisawright

    804 visa - lack of information on queues

    No, not always. There have been cases of other visas being cancelled and people who've been on bridging visas for years having to go home. I forget the most recent example. No, they don't. British pensioners get a CPI increase every year, it's built into the legislation. If you move to Australia, you won't get that CPI increase. You are assuming you'll be able to work. Some parent visas give you the right to work, BUT that doesn't mean the bridging visa does. Usually, if you get a bridging visa, it has the work rights of your original visa - which is a visitor visa, hence no right to work. I don't know if that's the case but it would obviously be important to check. An agent will know.
  11. Marisawright

    Sydney property

    He was talking about only 2 years actually and Sydney prices don’t always appreciate that fast
  12. Marisawright

    804 visa - lack of information on queues

    Assuming the OP is currently living in the UK, it was the reciprocal cover that I meant.
  13. Marisawright

    AUSTRALIAN CITIZENSHIP TIMELINES 2020-2021

    As I understand it, very few people get approved for an overseas ceremony. It is not usual. You may be lucky because they are being more lenient with many rules due to Covid, so all you can do is try. Otherwise it will just have to wait till you get back, so make sure you have a valid RRV before you go. I think your first problem will be getting a travel exemption to leave Australia.
  14. Marisawright

    I know no one will care but...........

    That's how it came about, apparently. She had some kind of severe nervous breakdown and that's why the order was put in place. In the US, once the order is in place, it's up to the guardian to decide when the person has recovered enough, and to ask the court to rescind the order. In other words, it's assumed that the guardian has the person's best interests at heart. If the US media is to be believed, Britney's guardian (her Dad) knows full well that she has recovered, but he's enjoying the access to her money too much. All he has to do is refuse to release her, and there's nothing she can do, other than go through this complicated and expensive court process.
  15. Marisawright

    804 visa - lack of information on queues

    No, there are no restrictions on joining the queue. The problem right now is that by 2023, the loophole you're planning to exploit may not exist any more. In fact, the 804 visa may not exist -the government has considered abolishing it once already, because medical care for 804 visa holders costs the taxpayer hundreds of thousands of dollars. That is probably why agents aren't interested in discussing it. So, I would say that all you can do is wait and see if it's still there when the time comes. If it does still exist, then you need to be aware of the downsides. By the time you apply, the waiting time will certainly be even more than 30 years, so you should assume you'll spend your whole life in Australia on a bridging visa. This means you are in limbo, not a permanent resident of Australia, but not a resident of the UK any more either. There are some implications to that. The good news is that you'll be covered by Medicare, though you won't be able to get cheap prescriptions like an Australian pensioner would. There are a few bits of bad news, though. First, you'll be stuck in Australia for the rest of your life. If you want to go overseas (for a holiday, or a visit back to the UK), you need to apply for a special visa every time (a BVB), for a fee of course, and justify why you need to go. If you want to buy a home, you'll be treated as a "foreign investor", even though you want to live in it. That means applying for special permission to FIRB (for a fee) and then paying a hefty surcharge on the purchase price, e.g. on a $500,000 property, the surcharge is $40,000. Your UK govt pension will be frozen at the rate you're getting when you leave the UK. You will never get any increases. At the same time, you will never be eligible for any Australian pension OR any welfare benefits, aged care, etc. So you would need to be very confident that your private pensions will be enough to live on till you die. Finally, a bridging visa is, literally, a bridge between two visas - in your case, a bridge between the visitor visa and the 804 visa. For the bridge to exist, both visas must exist. If the 804 visa is abolished at some point, your bridge will be broken, your bridging visa will be invalid, and you'll have to go back to the UK and set up your life all over again there. That may not be a big deal when you're 70 but could be a real challenge at, say, 82.
  16. Marisawright

    Sydney property

    If you are thinking of buying in Sydney, then selling up in three or four years and moving to Brisbane, then DO NOT DO IT! You will lose money on it, because your costs of buying and selling, plus your mortgage interest, will be far, far more than you would've paid in rent during that time, even at Sydney prices. Your best plan could be to buy a property up in Brisbane as soon as you can, and rent it out for the first few years, until you're ready to move up there and live in it yourself. To explain in more detail in case you're interested: if there is a "first home buyers" scheme when you arrive, there may not be stamp duty to pay, so let's assume that's the case. You'll have to pay conveyancing costs of around $2,000. Then you'll need a mortgage and there will be application fees. On a $550,000 property, you'll pay about $30,000 a year in mortgage payments, plus council rates, water rates and (if you buy an apartment or maisonette, which is likely in Sydney) strata fees of around $5,000 a year. Now let's say you stay in Sydney for two years. Over those two years, the home you've bought has cost you at least $70,000. That's all money out the door, because in the first 5 years of your mortgage, you're just paying off interest - you haven't paid anything off the mortgage at all. Then you'll have another $5,000 to shell out to sell the place. You could probably have rented a nicer place in a nicer suburb during that time for less than that. Obviously, the gamble is that the property has risen in price during that time - which at one time, in Sydney, you could confidently gamble on. Not so much now.
  17. Marisawright

    Cancel PR to be allowed to leave?

    I don't deny hundreds of travel exemptions are being rejected. But I was referring to rumours about people leaving permanently. I am seeing lots of evidence of people being refused leave for a visit, both in the media and here on PIO. I have yet to see an actual example of someone who submitted all the requirements and was unable to get an exemption to leave permanently. If you consider those reports/complaints the tip of the iceberg in each case, that strongly suggests to me that the number of permanent departures rejected are tiny compared to the number of temporary ones. But if you listen to the rumours flying around, you'd think refusal of pemanent departures was as common as the temporary ones, and that causes unnecessary anxiety. Your statistics make no distinction between those wishing to leave permanently and those wishing to move temporarily, so they add nothing to the discussion.
  18. Marisawright

    Cancel PR to be allowed to leave?

    To be fair, I think one problem is that due to the hysterical rumours about hundreds being rejected, some people are saying, "I'm not going to put my house on the market, book my shipping, or hand in my notice, because I might not get the exemption and then I'll be stuck". Which, of course, means they apply without sufficient evidence, and then they get rejected which seems to confirm their fears, so then they're stuck in a loop of their own making.
  19. Marisawright

    I know no one will care but...........

    I hear you Simmo. I like to think I don't look too bad for my age, but then I catch sight of a reflection in a shop window as I'm passing and think "who's that old bag?"
  20. Marisawright

    Cancel PR to be allowed to leave?

    Exactly. We keep hearing about all these people who are being refused permission to leave permanently--yet when I look for actual examples, the only examples I've been offered are people who want to leave for a visit. I know some of those examples are heart-breaking but they are a totally different thing and completely irrelevant. Unfortunately the result is that we get people like the OP panicking because they think they're going to get refused an exemption to leave permanently, when there's little concrete evidence that's the case
  21. Marisawright

    Split Year Resident - TAX 20/21

    As I understand it, you were an Australian resident for tax purposes in Australia up until the day you left. So you'll fill out your Australian tax return to include all income up till 16th September and no further. What you earned after that date is none of Australia's business because you became a UK resident. There's a place to declare it's your final tax return on the form.
  22. Marisawright

    491 visa

    @louwilkins, I just saw on another thread that the Priority list applies ONLY to employer-sponsored visas. So you can apply for a family-sponsored 491 now, but it won't even be looked at until the borders reopen (next year some time). There may be some advantage in applying now so you get in the queue, when you think of what the backlog will be by then - but I don't know
  23. Marisawright

    491 visa grant for offshore non-essential workers

    To puncture the balloon, a 190 is a permanent visa. This thread is for 491 visas and I don't think there's any sign of those being approved at all, since they aren't allowed to enter the country anyway.
  24. Marisawright

    Australian and UK Covid Responses

    It appears there may actually be a benefit to mixing but it’s very early days, so you’d be a guinea pig if you tried it
  25. Marisawright

    Cancel PR to be allowed to leave?

    I still think that cancelling PR is an extreme reaction. How often have we seen posters say they can't wait to see the back of Australia--only to remember, when they get home, that there was a reason they left. People like that will be regretting cancelling PR for the rest of their lives. Of course, there are people who've been back and forth already and are very certain - it makes sense for them. But we've seen too many on these forums who thought they were certain and weren't after all. It would be a great pity if they burned their bridges before making sure they'd tried all other alternatives.
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