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Marisawright

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Everything posted by Marisawright

  1. Marisawright

    Think outside the (city) box

    There are some grim suburbs out west, I must say, but there are nice ones as well, like any city. But you're right, the further west you go, the hotter it gets, and there are no sea breezes to temper the humidity. It just keeps getting stickier until you reach the Blue Mountains, then you can get up into the higher altitudes and cool down! That's one of the reasons we're in Melbourne not Sydney. I love many things about Sydney but our budget would've meant moving further west, and I am not good at coping with humid heat. However, like I said, one of the reasons for going west is you can get a much larger home for less money, so at least people have more spacious homes with air con, and for some people, that's attraction enough.
  2. Marisawright

    Think outside the (city) box

    As Wanderer says, it's the same as the "London thing". Both are big cities which are glamorous and exciting, with a vast range of amenities and attractions. But in both cities, you'll need a highly-paid job, or a rich family, if you want to actually live in the glamorous and exciting parts. The average joe on an average wage will end up in the outer suburbs, a very long way away. That's not a problem if you're happy with an ordinary suburban lifestyle, (like your brother), BUT for most people, the whole reason they pick Sydney is to get the lifestyle they see on a postcard or on Home & Away. Just like people pick London imagining life in Chelsea when all they're likely to afford is Dagenham. You were lucky to buy in the inner suburbs when they weren't fashionable, but few ordinary people could afford to buy in Surry Hills these days. It's not saying anything negative about Sydney. It's just acknowledging that foreigners judge the entire city by its affluent areas, and of course that's not realistic for any big city. The other aspect of the "Sydney thing" is that migrants seem to think they've got to pick Sydney because that's where the jobs are. That's as silly as an Australian thinking London is the only place they can live in England, because there aren't any jobs anywhere else in the whole country.
  3. Marisawright

    Think outside the (city) box

    I know a few people who do - but the whole point of moving "out west" is because you don't have to live in a sh*tbox, you can afford a nice home, with air conditioning. You're more likely to be living in a sweltering little box if you're in the inner suburbs. For me, the problem with living out west is that it's too far from all the things that make Sydney special for me.
  4. Marisawright

    Aged Parent visa 804

    I remember looking at Numbeo when we were thinking of going back to the UK - then getting to the UK and realising I shouldn't have relied on it, because it was wildly inaccurate. I guess it's like Wikipedia, only as accurate as the private individuals who contribute the data. The cost of alcohol is largely due to tax. This is an old article but a lot of it still applies. https://www.intheblack.com/articles/2015/11/17/is-the-australian-government-drunk-on-alcohol-taxes
  5. Marisawright

    Aged Parent visa 804

    I'd say worse than that. Remember, the UK state pension is frozen at whatever the rate is when you leave the UK - you never get any increases, and you lose all allowances. If your UK pension is barely enough to live on now, imagine trying to live on that same amount in 10 or 15 years' time! That's interesting feedback. I'm one of those who says, based on my time in the UK in 2015, that the cost of living is much the same. However, I didn't mean that supermarket shopping costs the same. I meant that some things are more expensive and some are cheaper, but we found that overall, we were spending about the same amount of money every month as we did in Australia. But as they say, "your experience may vary". For instance, we eat out a lot, and we found that eating out in the UK was massively more expensive - which offset the cheaper groceries. There were lots of other little things, some cheaper, some more expensive, which is why it's so difficult to calculate. All we could do was look at our total expenditure each month and it was about the same. But then, the exchange rate wasn't in our favour.
  6. Marisawright

    ANMAC skills assessment

    What's acceptable to AHPRA and what's acceptable for visa purposes are not the same thing, unfortunately. If the visa requirement is 3 years then it's not negotiable, even if AHPRA says you're qualified to work in Australia without it.
  7. The quoted wait time is misleading, because it includes high-risk countries where extra security checks are required. If you're applying from the UK, the process is faster (though Covid is affecting that). As Quoll says, the best advice is to apply for the 309 today and see what happens. You might be lucky and it will come through, problem solved. If your move date is approaching and it's not approved yet, there is nothing to stop her applying for a tourist visa or WHV to allow her to enter Australia. You just have to be careful, because the granting of one visa will cancel the other. So for instance, if she gets a WHV and then the 309 is granted, the WHV is automatically cancelled (which is not a problem). HOWEVER, let's say she applies for the WHV and while she's waiting for it to be approved, the 309 is granted. Then the next day, the WHV approval comes through and bam, the 309 is cancelled! You'd have to be pretty unlucky for that to happen but you have to be aware that it's possible.
  8. Bear in mind she'll have to do hotel quarantine when she arrives. Employment opportunities are almost back to normal in most of Australia now, so wouldn't it be better for her to delay her visit and then make the move permanently?
  9. Marisawright

    ANMAC skills assessment

    If the requirements say you need 3 years experience, then you need to wait until you have 3 years experience.
  10. Marisawright

    How are you meant to open a joint bank account?

    Medicare can also pay you in cash if you claim in person at an office, or they can send you a cheque, so you don't need a bank account to receive the payments. The Centrelink card is just what it says, a Centrelink pension card (only issued to someone on a pension), so not many Australians have one of those. Interesting that they all vary slightly. It looks like HSBC is the way to go, because they will take your Greek national ID card and a mobile phone or internet bill. I don't think your lodger agreement will count as a lease agreement.
  11. Marisawright

    How are you meant to open a joint bank account?

    The 100 points test isn't exclusive to Australia Post, it is supposed to be used by all financial institutions. Here is what you need to meet the requirements: https://www.finder.com.au/100-point-system You'll notice there is no mention of a "Centrelink card". I've lived in Australia for over 30 years and have never had a Centrelink card. I'm not even sure what it would be used for. Centrelink does issue concession cards to pensioners etc but it's not called a "Centrelink card". Perhaps your partner handed over his private health fund card by mistake, instead of his Medicare one?
  12. Marisawright

    How are you meant to open a joint bank account?

    You are on a bridging visa. That means you are only a temporary resident of Australia. Smaller banks (which might include MeBank) won't open accounts for foreigners. I suggest trying a bigger bank, used to dealing with international customers, like HSBC. Go into a branch rather than doing it online. What country are you from? I don't think you are entitled to a Medicare card while you are on a bridging visa. If your home country has a reciprocal agreement with Australia, you can be treated under Medicare in Australia, but that is nothing to do with the visa.
  13. Marisawright

    Skillselect ENS 186 Timeline

    Your employer should ask their migration agent. If they are not using a migration agent to handle the case, they are very foolish and it is unlikely to succeed.
  14. Marisawright

    Croc farms

    Not surprising, since gluten is harmful only to people who are gluten intolerant. It's not bad for you in itself - and in fact, a lot of "gluten-free" foods are very unhealthy, because they've replaced the gluten with sugar and fat.
  15. Marisawright

    Croc farms

    Very common in vegans, because there is virtually no B12 in a vegan diet. Not so much of an issue with vegetarians if they eat properly.
  16. Marisawright

    Moving back to oz

    From what I understand, the vaccines are different from usual vaccines. They stop you getting ill with Covid but they don't stop you carrying the infection and passing it on to someone else. If that proves to be the case, then being vaccinated won't change anything.
  17. Marisawright

    Visa 461 very long wait

    @OZ4221, you apply for an exemption https://covid19.homeaffairs.gov.au/travel-restrictions If you get refused, you can apply again immediately. So you have nothing to lose by giving it a try (it's free). You'll notice you have to qualify under one of the categories. If your partner is a New Zealander who can prove he's usually resident in Australia, you are eligible. If you want to be sure you're doing the right thing, an agent (like Paul Hand above) can do the application for you.
  18. Marisawright

    482 chef sponsorship required

    I don't think it is. Businesses can't sponsor anyone right now, (unless they're a medical professional), because it would be pointless - 482 visa holders aren't allowed into the country due to the border closures.
  19. Marisawright

    General Sponsorship question

    I've noticed you answering these old questions, and find myself wondering how I didn't see them when they were posted originally. I check the "New Posts" on PomsinOz every day (yes, I have no life), and some of them are questions i would've answered if I'd seen them - but I didn't. I wonder if there's a glitch occasionally, or if some forums just aren't included in the "New Posts"? I do think that if they're more than a couple of months old, the person has moved on and isn't likely to see the answer, so I don't bother. I assume they're just as capable of Googling as I am!
  20. I went through this in the opposite direction, when we tried to settle back in the UK. During my year in Southampton, I made a real effort to get out and make friends - writers' groups, the gym, ballroom dance classes and socials, etc - and though people were polite and friendly, I never made a single friendship. In all that time, I met only one woman that I clicked with - turned out she'd spent most of her life travelling the world with her husband's work and they were off to retire in Cyprus. I returned to Australia full of trepidation, convinced the problem was me: I'd got too old to make new friends ever again. How wrong I was. I'm living in a brand new city where I knew no one, but I have more friends now than I've ever had in my life. It's hard to know what causes it, exactly. I know one shouldn't make generalisations but I think it's something about the style of communication. I have no trouble having meaningful conversations with Aussies whereas I never felt I had one with anyone in the UK. I felt as though I was permanently tuned to a different wavelength.
  21. Marisawright

    General Sponsorship question

    A bigger question is, what kind of sponsorship are you seeking? If it's a 482 visa (which is a short-term 2 to 4 years visa), then the process can be quite fast. If it's a 186 DE visa, the process can take a long time (which is why it's not used much, because very few employers are willing to wait a year to fill a vacancy unless there's a really desperate shortage in your field). However right at this moment, unless you're in a priority occupation ( basically medical personnel), sponsorship visas aren't being processed because you wouldn't be allowed into the country due to Covid border closures.
  22. Marisawright

    General Sponsorship question

    @MARYROSE02, I'd be careful posting link to migration agent sites, because it could look as though you're recommending that agent (wihch I know you're not), Besides, you don't know anything about them or even whether their information is accurate.
  23. Marisawright

    UK Buy to Let Mortgage Solution

    Life in Australia is not better, it’s just different. Some people prefer the Australian lifestyle and some people prefer the British one. There are pros and cons to both. Personally, I prefer Australia but it’s just a personal preference, life here suits me better and I was never very close to my family. However, some people are very attached to their family. It’s not about whether the family is supportive or not, it’s about connections. Such people will be deeply unhappy in Australia and no amount of sun or financial success will ever make up for it.
  24. Marisawright

    Which Australian Visa to apply for?

    With only 75 points, you would stand absolutely no chance. However you may not have calculated correctly so see what an agent says
  25. Marisawright

    Aged Parent visa 804

    The waiting time for the 143 visa is now at least 8 years if you apply today. That's not the official waiting time - however you can easily work it out, by looking at the number of parents already in the queue and the number of visas they grant each year. It's disgraceful that Immigration gives a misleading waiting time for the 143 visa. The waiting time for the 804 is officially quoted as 30 years.
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