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Marisawright

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Everything posted by Marisawright

  1. Marisawright

    For those thinking of moving back to the UK

    I wonder if that's Perth. From my few visits, it seems much more conformist than Sydney.
  2. Marisawright

    ACT best place to live

    ...but only if you had enough money for a coastal property that's a short commute to work. Ain't gonna happen in Sydney unless you're a millionaire, and if you live in Brisbane, the beaches are a long way from the city.
  3. Marisawright

    ACT best place to live

    Is that based on your experience of Canberra or your perception of it? I've been as guilty as anyone - I live in Sydney and everyone here assumes Canberra is a dull, boring place. However after spending a fair bit of time working there on a contract, I've had to completely change my views. In fact, if we decide not to retire back to the UK (which we're contemplating mainly for the chance to travel more), then we're likely to retire to Canberra. Plenty to do in Canberra itself, friendlier people, easy drive to the snow/bush walks or the beach, easy drive to Sydney to see friends.
  4. Marisawright

    Thinking out loud

    Aunt Agatha, I think we're pretty much in the same place - and we're even looking at the same places, as my preference is to go to Bristol!
  5. Marisawright

    Thinking out loud

    We sold our house two years ago (major problems with a leaky roof and a psychotic neighbour) and didn't buy again because we were contemplating a move - so it wouldn't make sense to keep our rented house. The only reason we haven't made a decision before now is that my husband had a skin cancer scare and no sooner had we got over that, than I found out I needed a major spinal operation - which I had done in October,. I just got the final all-clear from my surgeon yesterday that I can go back to normal activity, provided I don't want to play first grade rugby league (in which case he'd advise me to wait another three months). :yes: We're looking at moving to the South of England. My youngest sister and her family, two of my nieces and one of my nephews live down South, and my older sister keeps threatening to move from Aberdeen to be closer to the grandkids (plus she misses the weather there and her husband is from Surrey). However we are thinking of spending some time in Scotland before we take on a permanent rental!
  6. Marisawright

    Melbourne - One year in

    I've only ever worked in Sydney and I got out of the rat race a few years ago, but the only company like that I came across was privately owned (it was RAMS Home Loans, and it was an amazing place to work - but they got bought over by Westpac so I assume they're the same as everywhere else now). I agree that you'd have a better chance of finding such a thing in a smaller company, as the bosses will have more chance to see what you're really doing - in a big company managers are always over-worked and only looking at the surface.
  7. Marisawright

    Tasmania or the UK??

    This is modern life in a city. It's exactly the same in Australia in the big cities.
  8. Marisawright

    anything wrong with Kellyville?

    All those areas are very popular with families with young children, so you should fit in well with the community. If you're hoping for an Aussie beach lifestyle, though, it's a very long way from that. It will take you 45 minutes to an hour to get to the Northern Beaches, and in summer you'll need to spend a fortune on parking when you get there. There's no way to get to the beaches by public transport. Where will you be working? If it's the CBD, take a look South - anywhere on the train line down to Sutherland, they're all an easy commute and within easy reach of good beaches.
  9. Marisawright

    Melbourne - One year in

    I was complaining about that exact same thing to my sister (who's a high-powered senior manager in London). She has worked at several big multi-nationals in London, and she said they're all like that - if you want to get ahead, you have to forget about doing a thorough methodical job, and focus on what will look good. So I don't think it's an exclusively Aussie thing. Maybe you were just lucky with the companies you worked for in the UK, or maybe Midlands companies still have that old work ethic.
  10. Marisawright

    any advice please? emigrating with dementia

    I know you're not doing it deliberately but sadly, it would be very selfish to take him away from what he knows. It's a really bad idea to relocate someone with dementia - even if he's in the early stages. He will have difficulty learning anything new - which means he'll struggle to learn his way around a new neighbourhood or make new friends, so he could end up stuck in the house alone. He may even be worse than you think - it's only the fact that he's in familiar surroundings and in familiar routines that are keeping him going. You won't even be able to apply until you've been in Australia for two years and by then, he is going to be worse. Besides, as others have said, it's very unlikely you'll be able to get him into Australia anyway. The government looks at whether a person will be a burden on the health system. There are cases all the time, including a doctor who got turned down for migration recently because he has a disabled daughter - even though he was going to a country hospital which was desperate for his services, he had private health insurance and plenty of assets.
  11. Marisawright

    Tasmania or the UK??

    If you are worried about missing your family now, then imagine how you will feel when you are thousands of kilometres away. Flights sold in Australia are far more expensive, and the airlines are mean - if you live in Australia they will not let you buy a ticket at cheaper European prices. So a trip home will cost you almost $2,000 each, plus the cost of getting from Tasmania to Melbourne. How often will you afford to go home at those prices? In your shoes, I would consider going to a quieter part of the UK to try it first. If you could live with the weather, you might consider somewhere in Scotland - plenty of less-developed areas to look at.
  12. Marisawright

    For those thinking of moving back to the UK

    In your face beauty - I didn't get that either. The unspoiled sections of the Sunshine Coast, yes - but Gold Coast over-development and monotonous dry bushland aren't my idea of beauty! Your comment about British conservatism is the only thing that worries me about going back. I remember when I came to Oz, it was exhilarating to get away from all the Hyacinth Buckets. I could never stand having my whole life controlled by "what will the neighbours think?" I hope that has changed in 30 years!
  13. Marisawright

    For those thinking of moving back to the UK

    Going back will work for some and not for others. The most important thing for anyone thinking of going back is - sit down and make a list of the reasons you left in the first place. If you can't think of any, you're probably deluding yourself - stay sitting down some more and think again!
  14. Thanks so much for this informative thread. I'm sure there are many other people who've had good experiences with Movecube, but it's good to know the downsides. The thing that I find especially useful is the timeframe to load up your belongings. I had noticed that they won't leave the Movecube overnight - they warn you that you've only got a day to pack. However I hadn't thought about transit time being included in that "day" - I was assuming it would be delivered at 9 and picked up at 5.
  15. Marisawright

    coffee shop business start up

    I'd be worried about starting a business on arrival, because you don't know enough about the local market. You need to know where the customers are and what the demand is, and I don't think you can do that research adequately from the UK. Do it too early and you could find yourself stuck with a lease on a coffee shop in the wrong place, and commercial leases are virtually impossible to get out of here. So I would allow several months to get to know the area before you take the plunge. Definitely don't do barista training in the UK. In all my visits home I've had only a handful of decent coffees - it may not be that coffee's bad in the UK, just that tastes are different, but whatever, you need to know how to make coffee for Aussies.
  16. Marisawright

    moving super to a UK pension.

    All you can do is leave it in your super fund until you reach the age when you can take a lump sum (which will be somewhere around 60 years of age). Then you can cash it out and transfer the money to the UK, and into a pension if you like. If it's in a self-managed super fund, you'll need to shift it to another fund before you go, as SMSF's owned by non-residents are taxed very highly.
  17. Marisawright

    Mind made up :)

    ...but surely PR doesn't grant you forever access to Australia? I think it's only valid for a certain number of years and then, if you haven't lived in Australia for a reasonable amount of time during that period, they won't give you a return visa, so you can't get back in.
  18. Marisawright

    Mind made up :)

    Once you've got your PR, it's only 1 more year and you can get your citizenship. Couldn't you hang out that long? PR gives you a cushion but it doesn't guarantee you can come back - rules can change, apart from anything else. You're feeling it worse right now because the memory of your trip is still fresh, but you say yourself you've had a fab time so far, so maybe once you've made the decision and you know it's not forever, you could make up your mind to enjoy it for a little bit longer?
  19. Marisawright

    Had enough (for now at least)

    No, but if they're about to criticise me for it, I'd rather they asked first! I don't see why it needs any response if it comes up in conversation - it's just a fact. And to put you out of your misery, it's nothing to do with health, just bad timing in the marriage stakes - I delayed having kids and then my husband inconveniently decided to take off with a younger woman. By the time I'd found my second husband it was all too late (49)!
  20. Marisawright

    thinking of moving back to uk

    You don't pay anything for "dual citizenship". You're a Brit already and you stay a Brit, all you do is apply for Australian citizenship as well. http://www.citizenship.gov.au/applying/fees_forms_appeals/
  21. Marisawright

    Had enough (for now at least)

    Me too. I liken it to a marriage break-up - when everything goes wrong, many people feel they need someone to blame, and refuse to accept either (a) it was just a mistake to get together in the first place or (b) there's fault on both sides. They have to demonise the other person to cover up their feelings of failure. Likewise, some people feel the need to demonize Australia - it makes them feel better. On the other side - as a childless woman, I have been demonized (literally - one evangelist once called me "the work of the devil"). No one asks me why I'm childless, BTW. Anyhoo... I see the UK-bashers as akin to those mothers who verbally bash me for not having kids. I suspect they secretly regret having children themselves, and they're just trying to convince themselves their choice was the right one. I know plenty of mothers who don't feel that need to justify themselves!
  22. Bear in mind, flights within Australia are very expensive and the train from Perth to anywhere is about as bad. So if you buy a return flight to Perth, you'll be up for big costs getting to and from there at the start and end of your trip. Have you looked into a Round The World fare? That would let you have stopovers on the way to and from. Here's one from the STA as an example: http://ww4.statravel.co.uk/gets_apps/images/RTW_p30_fly_south_for_the_winter.pdf Usually on these fares, you can stay in each stopover as long as you like - so you could have your month in NZ and your stay in Asia. Of course the fare is usually only valid for 12 months so that means you won't get the full year in Australia, but it could be a huge money saver. What's the attraction of Perth? What other places are you keen to visit?
  23. Marisawright

    May was hottest on Earth since records began

    There will always be people on both sides taking advantage of the situation.
  24. Marisawright

    May was hottest on Earth since records began

    Surely BBC pensions - and even government research grants - are a drop in the ocean up against the money the big corporations are throwing at this issue on the other side. I just Googled and this is just one example: http://www.greenpeace.org/usa/en/campaigns/global-warming-and-energy/polluterwatch/koch-industries/ Koch Industries is a minnow compared to the big multi-nationals so their investment is just the tip of the iceberg. It's an old story. There were the big companies who knew leaded petrol was dangerous last century, but kept on making it even though they knew it was killing their own employees. The tobacco companies who fought tooth and nail, and funded 'research' to challenge the dangers of cigarettes. There was a big asbestos mine in Swaziland when I lived there - they had generously built a sanatorium for all their ex-employees who had "tuberculosis" (actually asbestosis). James Hardie in Australia who covered up evidence of asbestosis for years, and then tried to avoid liability by moving their company offshore. The insulation company I used to work for, who bought over and dismantled a company which made safer, cheaper insulation. It still amazes me that corporations have so little conscience. They're run by people, after all, and you'd think those people would have some regard for the future of their own children - but power seems to do strange things to people. Or maybe the kind of people who get to the top in big companies are a different breed. Whether climate change is man-made or not hardly matters: the point is, it's looking extremely likely that the planet is warming, which will cause more extreme weather (hot and cold), sea levels changes, etc etc. If someone told you there was even a 10% chance your home was going to get flooded within the next few years, you'd take steps to prepare for that, wouldn't you?
  25. Marisawright

    Cost of Living expectations

    Sydney is by far the most expensive city in Australia. Comparing Sydney costs to other Australian cities is like comparing London costs to the rest of the UK. I don't know one single person - friends or acquaintances - with a stay-at-home partner, except for a few with new babies. Where in Sydney are you thinking of settling?
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