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Marisawright

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Everything posted by Marisawright

  1. Marisawright

    I would love to move back to the UK, but it is so hard.

    That would concern me, too. We're looking at returning to the UK but the fact is, what my OH would really like is to be a grey nomad, travelling around Europe and the UK. I think at my age, I need somewhere to call home.
  2. Marisawright

    We moved back 4 years ago

    How can you decide whether to embrace it or not, if you know nothing about it? You don't have to make that decision - just make a decision to get involved with it, and to learn about it, then see what you think.
  3. Marisawright

    I would love to move back to the UK, but it is so hard.

    Actually the funny thing is, you pay more tax, not less. I think most people imagine that if you're a "non-resident" of a country, then you don't have to pay tax. But the fact is if you're a non-resident, and you've got investments in that country, you're taxed at a much higher rate than residents are.
  4. Marisawright

    Why do people leave Oz

    It probably doesn't help that I'm not a camper - and also I think it's different going as a kid than as an adult. No doubt you spent most of your time playing, rather than walking along enjoying the scenery. Besides, have you been going back to those places every year since? I've been in Sydney for over thirty years . . .
  5. Marisawright

    We moved back 4 years ago

    That's a rather sad statement. If I suddenly fell in love with a Greek or a Spaniard and moved to his country, I wouldn't go with an attitude of putting up with it - because that would guarantee I'd never fully settle. I'd at least make an attempt to get to know the country.
  6. Marisawright

    I would love to move back to the UK, but it is so hard.

    I've just been doing some research and yes, LostLily is right. If you have a permanent home in two countries and you move between them like clockwork, then yes you are considered "resident" in both countries - because, let's face it, you are - and you will be liable to tax in both countries. It doesn't mean you'll pay more tax, because you'll be taxed at resident rates and there's a double taxation agreement. It just means two tax returns. In LostLily's case it would actually be a lot better than if she moved to the UK permanently (because then she'd be charged Aussie tax at harsh, non-resident rates).
  7. Marisawright

    We moved back 4 years ago

    I can understand that! It makes me wonder, though. Maybe if you'd moved to a nicer part of the UK, you might've been able to stick it out?
  8. Marisawright

    Why do people leave Oz

    Yes, I was making the point that if Oz has changed for the worse, other places have changed for the worse too.
  9. Marisawright

    Why do people leave Oz

    It's not that easy. Remember we're talking about things to do on days off, not where to spend your holidays. To travel in Australia you need to get on a plane, and that's not something you can do every week. There's very little heritage to see, and it's all pretty much the same wherever you go. The bush is much the same everywhere too, and devoid of wildlife (because everything is either asleep or up the top of the trees), apart from the ticks, spiders, snakes, sandflies and mozzies. Yes the Snowies and Blue Mountains have some nice views, but otherwise they're either featureless plain or ordinary bush (see previous comment). I should repeat, I have enjoyed living in Australia and I like many things about it. Having driven on countless roads and walked trails all the way from Adelaide to Mackay through SA, NSW and QLD, I can say that diversity is not one of them. I'm looking forward to going for a country walk back in the UK and enjoying the changing scenery and the chance to actually see a few birds as opposed to just hearing them. As someone who grew up in the UK before holidays in Benidorm became cheap, I haven't seen a lot of Europe and look forward to exploring it. That's what suits me at this point in my life - I'm not saying it would suit anyone else. Australia is neither better or worse than the UK, both have their good and bad points.
  10. Marisawright

    I would love to move back to the UK, but it is so hard.

    If you've been suffering anxiety attacks for so long, could it be that your OH/daughter assume your current unhappiness is all part of the same problem? I find it really hard to believe they'd be so hard-hearted if they really understood how you feel. How would your daughter react if she could read this thread? Would she be delighted to know you're sacrificing your happiness for her sake, or would she be horrified? As for your OP, does he realise there's private health insurance in the UK too, and if you transfer from your Aussie health fund to a UK one, there's no pre-existing conditions rule. From what I've seen it costs about the same too. If you go private in the UK it's just as good - or better - as the private system in Oz. Finally, I assume that with such severe anxiety attacks, you've got some kind of therapist. Have you spoken to him/her about all this?
  11. Marisawright

    Why do people leave Oz

    I doubt anywhere in the world is the same as seven years ago. The whole world is changing faster and faster.
  12. Marisawright

    So many empty houses

    I agree with you, there is wear and tear and it's a cost to fix it, so it is logical in a way. However it goes too far IMO - the result is that I've never paid a cent of tax on my rental income, ever! Whereas if there was no depreciation allowance and I'd had to claim the actual repair expenses instead, I would've paid quite a bit of tax. Thje other downside of the depreciation "lurk" is that there's a disincentive for landlords to maintain their properties properly - if they spend money on repairs and improvements they can't claim them directly.
  13. Marisawright

    I would love to move back to the UK, but it is so hard.

    Does your daughter in Oz know how you feel? Are you sure you're not just assuming she'll be "sad, lonely and resentful"? She's got a husband and family of her own now, after all. Has she seen you in tears of unhappiness, or are you stoically hiding your grief from her? I think it would be worth talking to her, tell her how you long to be back in the UK, but you're afraid she'll never forgive you if you go. She might be more understanding than you think - and even if she says, "I couldn't bear it if you left", then you'll be better off - she may be more supportive and understanding of your situation in future. I completely understand this as we're in a very similar situation (thankfully, only in a financial sense!). If you become non-residents, you'll lose your Aussie tax-free threshold which means paying full tax on all your rental income, and you'd pay tax on your SMSF at 46%. That's a big hit to your income. On the other hand, if you sell your properties and cash in your SMSF to take it to the UK, you'll pay a big whack of capital gains tax which will deplete your nest egg. For us, that could make the difference between surviving comfortably in retirement and running out of money in old age. However, there's no way we could contemplate the cost of flying back and forth to the UK every year, either - so are you sure you're not more comfortably-off than you think? If your capital gains bill would be so huge, you must be sitting on a big profit in those properties. Yes it does hurt to pay tax, but if you've got enough money left over afterwards, then it's not really such a big deal.
  14. Marisawright

    Weight

    I believe her, I'm obese according to those charts too. If I stand behind something (so my legs are obscured) I can look quite good - but when you can see my little dumpy legs, the illusion is ruined. My body would look great on a 6 foot Amazon!
  15. Marisawright

    So many empty houses

    It's not really a Ponzi scheme - in fact it makes logical sense in a way, because the fabric of the building is depreciating, and one day the landlord is going to have to refurbish it. For instance, after a few years I had to repaint and replace the carpets in my unit (you can't claim that kind of thing against expenses). However it does ignore the fact that the property is increasing in value all the time too, so even if you do have to carry those costs, you're still making a profit.
  16. Marisawright

    Only 2,000,000 Australians earn over $88,000

    Most families I know have two incomes, so double it.
  17. Marisawright

    We moved back 4 years ago

    We never travel on weekends or bank holidays already - why bother with all that traffic when we can go during the week?
  18. Marisawright

    So many empty houses

    A lot of Australians do, it's a great tax lurk in Australia. When you buy a house or flat to rent out, you obviously get rent which counts as income. However, you only get taxed on the profit after you've deducted all your expenses - mortgage interest, agent's fees, maintenance and depreciation. Depreciation isn't a "real" expense - it's a notional figure to reflect wear and tear on the property. So basically you get a deduction for money you've never spent. It can be a large amount - enough to completely wipe out your profit as far as the taxman is concerned. I've had an investment property for many years and while I was working, I got a tax refund every single year of between $5,000 and $10,000. All thanks to depreciation! Depreciation is a percentage of the building cost of the home and its fixtures/fittings, and it's highest when the property is brand new - after five years it drops down to a much lower level. So a lot of people buy a brand new property, hold it for five years, then sell it and buy another one. That's why you often see a flood of new properties on the market when a development is about five years old. It's actually not the best strategy, but some people get so obsessed with not paying tax, they don't think about anything else! One big problem is that there are a lot of shonky property schemes, teaching people to take advantage of this to "build wealth". Often they're in league with developers, and sell over-priced new developments - especially in Queensland - to naive investors. Then people realise they can't afford them because the mortgage is too high, and wiping out any profit even with depreciation, so they end up back on the market.
  19. Marisawright

    Argh- sign from the universe!?

    So did you travel the whole of Australia and did you find it shocking everywhere? Or are you just talking about the city you were in? Be fair - I suspect if you picked the right (or rather wrong) city in the UK you could have the same experience.
  20. Marisawright

    We moved back 4 years ago

    I'd agree (touching wood) that I've never encountered that kind of trouble in Australia either. You make the UK sound like a scarey place! I'm hoping it's just that you ventured into areas the locals would know to avoid!!
  21. Marisawright

    We moved back 4 years ago

    Nightlife for the over 60's? I don't think so. Shows are expensive - over $100 per ticket, can't do that every week. We do go dancing sometimes in the evenings, it's not the evenings that are the problem. It's what to do during the day. We're not interested in sunbaking - I would swim a bit, but my husband is paranoid about overdoing the sun since his skin cancer, so it's not worth the effort of getting to the beach. Manly is pleasant, the Blue Mountains are pretty, and I've certainly enjoyed them over the years - but it has been 30 years, and you can only go to the same places so many times! It's the tyranny of distance that's the bane of Australian life really - the number of interesting places you can reach for a day trip is very limited, so you do them to death. Whereas you can pick almost any town in the UK and there would be any number of interesting historical sites, walks on disused railways, country pubs etc within a reasonable drive. I'm not complaining really, because I do realise we're lucky not to be working - but that doesn't mean we have to resign ourselves to sitting at home all day reading a book.
  22. Marisawright

    move back to the UK from Australia

    I am thinking of moving back myself, actually, and I can fully understand why the OP wants to move - healthwise, it makes perfect sense for him/her to do so (sorry, not sure which gender, will go with "he" from now on for simplicity). The problem is that the OP won't be able to get the UK disability pension for two years, and will never be entitled to an age pension in the UK. So it looks as though moving to the UK isn't practical, unless he has substantial personal funds - which I get the impression is not the case. The OP has said he never wanted to come to Australia, that he doesn't feel he's an Australian, and that he's miserable living where he is. Others have tried to suggest that he should move to areas of Australia where the UV index is much lower, i.e. Melbourne or Tasmania, where his condition should be much less severe. However he seems determined to be a martyr and stay where he is.
  23. Marisawright

    Skin Cancer

    I agree - the safety message has been taken too far. In fact, some kids are actually getting Vitamin D deficiency because their parents have gone so overboard protecting them from the sun! There's a balance to be struck, but it is difficult to keep a balanced view when you're being bombarded with ads about skin cancer. I always feel sorry for the babies. In the summer, every stroller I see is shrouded in a thick blanket. The poor kid must be baking to death under there!
  24. Marisawright

    I would love to move back to the UK, but it is so hard.

    I agree with you about those new estates, but the OP was claiming these statements apply to the whole of Australia, not just new estates. That's what people are objecting to.
  25. Marisawright

    move back to the UK from Australia

    What does that have to do with anything? You're claiming the whole of Australia is too hot for you, when a simple search on the net would tell you there are plenty of cooler places to move to. You're just too prejudiced about those places to consider them, even though they could be a solution to your health problems. Sydney is definitely not one of those cooler places so I don't see what the Blue Mountains has to do with it. As for loathing - you've said you never wanted to come to Australia, and that you're miserable where you are. How am I supposed to take that, except that you hate where you're living? And Tasmania - you said: "Tassie is not even class on the map here they are left well behind as it not part of the mainland it like uk but has really high unemployment and miles away from anywhere else - See more at: http://www.pomsinoz.com/forum/moving-back-uk/210436-move-back-uk-australia-3.html#sthash.Bz9QCbyW.dpuf
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