snifter

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snifter last won the day on November 12 2015

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  1. Hi. I've moved this to our family visa section and also changed the title from your username to the visa type.
  2. Moved to the family visa forum
  3. For non visa stuff you could make use of the other sections like shipping and the like. We have a fair few threads on Movecube with lots of info.
  4. You don't need to be massively detailed that I am aware of. There wasn't that much room on the forms to write lots iirc. We did ensure the boxes were clearly numbered and also wrote that same description on those to tally with the list. We kept our own personal list where we had more detail so we knew what was in where but that didn't go to the shipping paperwork. We kept it. We also ensured we packed the boxes that they would most likely check last so they were right there when they cranked the cube open at customs. So the boxes with shoes and boots and tools. When our cube arrived to us the shoe boxes had customs tape round them showing they had been checked. We were glad we had left them at the front. For example we just put it down like this box 1 - clothes and coats box 2 - books and DVD's box 3 - kids toys and books box 4 - kitchen utensils and crockery box 5. - bedding/towels/kids clothes box 6 - shoes and boots and so on
  5. People do so while waiting for grants of other off shore visas. I can't see why this would be any different. They then have to leave Aus for a few days for the visa to actually be granted and then re enter. Inform your CO of your travel plans, flight info etc and ensure they can contact you at the email address you gave them. Else they won't be able to notify you of your visa grant and arrange with you for you to go off shore for it to be granted.
  6. York is lovely. Depends what you want from an area tbh. Define 'safe' or 'great schools' as peoples opinions will vary. Also the ways schools are rated in the UK is very different to Aus. TBH I don't place much stock in Ofsted reports and quite happily placed my child in a good but not rated 'outstanding' by Ofsted school. They are useful to a point but what you want from a school isn't always found in an Ofsted report. I wouldn't send my child to a very poorly rated by Ofsted school and would use it to rule certain schools out that way. But I'd not rule out good or whatever it is they use these days over outstanding. You need to consider what you are hoping to do work wise also and factor in that some areas may be better than others in terms of that. I can think of plenty of lovely safe areas with good schools but they probably see just as much crime, quite possibly more than places here but doesn't mean I'd not live there. Just depends what your level of acceptable is. Serious crime is rare in most places tbf. Minor crimes tend to happen across the board. In our area we had car/shed break ins, burglaries, cars stolen, damage to local parks etc and that was par for the course of suburban living for us. A few other things also would crop up from time to time. Living rural we had different types of crime. Horse theft, livestock theft, farm equipment stolen, fuel stolen, house break ins, working dogs stolen and so on. Less damage to public property and spaces though. Keep in mind also that holidays are very different to the reality of living somewhere. Day to day life will go on. If its an adventure for a couple of years you will probably be ok with it and use your weekends (if not working) and school hols to explore around a bit.
  7. I think the partner visa is your only option tbh. Unless as said, you meet the requirements for a skilled PR visa. Are you on a 1 year tourist visa and if so, does that mean it has until Feb 2018 to run to now? You are to all intents and purposes a tourist in Australia if on that. If you were planning on an on shore partner visa application you probably would have been better to have gotten the 3 month tourist visa and applied within those 3 months before it expired. You would then have gone on to a bridging visa with full work rights till a decision was made on the partner visa. My understanding is that if you lodge now or any point before the tourist visa expires, you will remain on that visa till it ends and then the bridging visa will kick in and your work rights and access to certain other things also. Hopefully someone else can clarify that for you. You can lodge now and then be in the processing queue but be prepared for the long wait (yes 17 months is probably what you are looking at time wise, I doubt it will move much quicker from when you lodge). Lodging in the next couple of months would see a hopeful grant window around the end of 2018 I would think. I realise you moved in a hurry but you've not left yourself in an ideal situation having not researched this in more detail before you made the move over. Outside of the partner visa on shore now and what that entails you don't have anything in the way of options that I can think of. Off shore application may well have been the best option prior to your move but as you are already in Aus, its the on shore option. Good luck with it all
  8. Migration solicitor? Do you mean a migration agent? That is who you need to seek out. A reputable MARA agent.
  9. Contact an agent. They will know your best course of action at this point. Also read this PDF carefully. Section 4 covers the waiver. It waives the 12 months, doesn't say about bringing it down to 6 that I can see. https://www.border.gov.au/Forms/Documents/1127.pdf
  10. Please run your case past a reputable migration agent asap. Any on here would be a good starting point. I'd do that before doing anything else. Fwiw if you live in a state where you can register your relationship this waives the 12 month rule for being de facto iirc. You would still have to prove your relationship being genuine in other ways though, so living together, sharing a life, bills, finances etc as a de facto couple. Not all states offer this option though. But it may be of use if you do live in a state that does and want to lodge a partner visa.
  11. I loved Wonder Woman. Set in WW1. Might not appeal though. It's very well done. Loved Hidden Figures but that is out on DVD now. Dunkirk may appeal? Trailers were hard hitting. Out soon. It's on our to see list. Also check your local Arthouse cinema or large multiplex for specials like plays, operas etc being screened. We often see older films being re run for a short time during a season theme or some such.
  12. An independent insurance is the best way to go tbh. I'd not take out the shipping companies own. Main reason being is if you do need to make a claim, LP will deal with it no fuss or dramas. A shipping company is most likely going to argue their case and pay out the least amount possible while causing you extra stress. You can read no end of stories on here of people having issues with the shipping company insurance when they have needed to make a claim. Don't read that sort of thing when its an independent insurance generally.
  13. No. All done via the UK now. It's actually really easy to do from overseas and ours were back within a few weeks. Same cost as if in UK also. https://www.gov.uk/overseas-passports
  14. It is. And I do appreciate that the NI aspect is a Brexit issue Just when people wander off and post about the IRA, the troubles, bombings and so forth, that is no longer Brexit discussion and things rarely get back on track from that sort of thing without some prodding. Which I've done as it would be a shame to lose the Brexit discussion.
  15. At their ages, the chances are they will settle just fine, make friends and be away. Pretty much as they would have done in Aus. Nursery is pretty easy going in the UK. Its play based and kids do like to play usually Admittedly there is tons of paperwork they have to fill in for what amounts to 15 hours a week unless attending more because you work or prefer more hours etc, but really, the staff are drilled to ensure kids are included, that they have the big sharing policy and kindness towards others. What will matter more IMHO is making those friends but having it extend outside of nursery (some parents don't want to make more adult friends or have playdates with kids from nursery as they already have their friendship groups) and being prepared to start at a school where perhaps none or only a few of the kids form nursery may attend. Again though, school is really inclusive and reception is very much play based with lots of time for kids to be kids. They usually figure it out