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  1. Past hour
  2. Rallyman

    Apollo 11 fiftieth anniversary

    As said you can’t help yourself , maybe a better choice would have beenGerman as I am dam sure you wouldn’t know if they were Nazi or not maybe just being forced to work for the nazis ,
  3. tonyman

    Netflix & Stan

    Bloodline is getting boring now, just seems to me going on and on and on.......
  4. Lisa De Leon

    870 parents temporary visa

    According to a Facebook group for Registered Migration Agents, there have not been a lot of 870 Sponsor approvals thus far. Agents were still waiting at beginning of July for sponsorship applications lodged in April. My first application took about 8 weeks. The visas are capped at 15,000 places annually, and I have heard that around 500 sponsorship applications have been lodged so far.
  5. wrussell

    Advice on 820 subclass visa

    If you were granted an 801 and you have maintained close ties with Australia it might be worth your while to apply for a RRV. If your children are Australian citizens, resident in Australia, this might enhance your RRV prospects. This is NOT a considered professional opinion. I suggest you consult a registered migration agent to get one.
  6. Marisawright

    489 instead of 190

    As you probably know, the 190 visa is sponsored by the state - however once you have the visa, you can live anywhere in Australia. There is only a "moral obligation" to stay in your sponsoring state. The states are getting fed up of people ignoring the "moral obligation" and leaving as soon as they get their 190 - so they are offering more 489's. I'm guessing this may be what has happened in your case. There's not much you can do about it.
  7. Hex

    Skillselect ENS 186 Timeline

    @Roni S I tend to agree with your MA. On a personal note, I went through a same situation whilst awaiting my visa, I told my MA and we updated the information within my application (didn't lodge a new one) and it was never used / looked at. Personally, I was always about, too much information couldn't hurt but i'm sure I could have left it out the application all together if I so chose.
  8. Today
  9. Roni S

    Skillselect ENS 186 Timeline

    Hi guys, got the following reply from my MA, "We only need to submit a new nomination if your pay is going to be decreased, not if it is increased. There is no need to update Immigration of this change". @pravincv @Muppett @Hex
  10. starlight7

    6 reasons that you came to live in Australia

    Have to say the current state govt needs to change- nasty sneaky lot.
  11. Yesterday
  12. wrussell

    Contributory Aged Parent Visa 864

    You can’t enrol in Medicare if you’ve applied for an 804 or 103 parent visa. You may have some cover under a Reciprocal Health Care Agreement
  13. Marisawright

    6 reasons that you came to live in Australia

    I agree. Sydney is the same. I always felt that great swathes of the outer suburbs didn't deserve to be called "Sydney" at all, because they bore so little relationship to the vibrant inner burbs. That's why I moved, because I couldn't afford to live in the "good bits" of Sydney any more. I can afford the "good bits" of Melbourne and it makes all the difference.
  14. Marisawright

    Contributory Aged Parent Visa 864

    There are two ways to apply for a visa. Note that the visa number may vary, depending whether you want to apply "offshore" (in the UK) or "onshore" (in Australia), so make sure you know which is which. It's wise to consult an agent like Westly Russell (above), but bear in mind their job is to advise how to get into Australia, not to advise on the practical implications of the various visas on your lives. Method 1. Apply from the UK and wait in the UK for the application to be approved. If you take this route, you can still get holiday visas to visit your daughter while you're waiting. Method 2. Arrive in Australia on a tourist visa and then apply for a parent visa once you're settled. If you take this route, you'll get a bridging visa which allows you to stay in Australia while you're waiting. Since the waiting time for a Contributory Parent Visa is something like 8 years, it would seem like a no-brainer to choose option 2. However there are a few snags, so you need to be well aware of them before you make the decision. While you're on a bridging visa, you are not legally resident in Australia - you are just a visitor, even if you're on that bridging visa for ten years. That limits your rights and benefits, including things like your right to buy a house or travel, and your access to medical care. At the same time, you will cease to be a legal resident of the UK and lose access to some rights and benefits there (including access to the NHS). In other words, you're in limbo. Personally, I'd say apply while you're still in the UK and wait in the comfort of your own home, with no complications and restrictions. You can visit your daughter each year on a tourist visa, knowing that by the time you're getting too old for all the travelling, you'll have your permanent visa and can relocate. Even with the air fares, that's likely to be the cheapest solution. To provide a bit more detail about restrictions on a bridging visa: If you want to buy a house, you'll be treated as a "foreign investor". You'll have to apply for special permission to buy a place (for a fee of course), and then you'll have to pay extra stamp duty as well - double, in some states. We had someone post recently who had to pay an extra $45,000 in stamp duty You can't leave Australia. If you want to leave the country, you have to apply for a separate visa (a BVB). You'll get the BVB for a specific period of weeks or months, and the next time you want to travel, you'll have to apply again. If you're receiving the British aged pension, it will be frozen forever at whatever rate you're getting when you leave the UK - so the earlier you leave the UK, the lower your pension will be. While you're on the bridging visa, you won't be entitled to any Australian pension, seniors' benefits or aged care. I don't know your ages but it's worth considering that when your application finally reaches the head of the queue, you'll have to pass medicals. What will your health be like by then? If you fail the medical, you'll have to pack up and move back to the UK. If there's a risk you might fail the medical, then you have to weigh up the pro's and con's - on the one hand, you could say that at least you managed to get a few years living in Oz with your daughter, but on the other hand, you might regret having disposed of your home and possessions for a temporary move. Finally, medical costs. This is a grey area, and may or may not be a problem on the bridging visa. If you read the Immigration website, it says that as a British resident, you will have access to Medicare but only for "essential services", not elective surgery. That may not sound too bad - but consider, what if you need a hip replacement? That's elective surgery. You can't hop back to the UK to get it done either, because if you're no longer resident in the UK, you'll lose access to the NHS. So if you're sensible, you'll get private health insurance - but it's not like private cover in the UK, because it only covers part of the cost. To give you an idea, I had an op on my neck which cost $35,000. The insurance only paid for $25,000. However, we've had a few instances recently where parents on bridging visas have been issued with an interim Medicare card and been able to access the full range of treatments. Whether that's a mistake or a loophole I have no idea.
  15. wrussell

    Contributory Aged Parent Visa 864

    Have you consulted a registered migration agent for an assessmrent of your case?
  16. Raul Senise

    482 TSS to PR

    190 or 187 may be options. 186 under transitional arrangements may also be an option, depending on when you applied for your current 457 visa. As Arborist is on the short term list, the 189 is not an option.
  17. RK_190

    489 instead of 190

    Hello All, I have applied for NT sponsorship for 190 application but I have been offered with 489 visa. I am working full time in my skilled occupation from the last 18 months. I met all the conditions for 190 Visa but still I have been offered with 489 Visa stating that I need to be in NT for at least 3 years to get 190 nomination. However, it was not mentioned in any of the Migration NT websites. Has anyone got the similar response? Regards, RK
  18. wrussell

    Help Choosing Visa Type

    Have you discussed the upcoming 'partner points' changes with your RMA?
  19. Amit Gupta

    Skillselect ENS 186 Timeline

    Yes, it's. Hopefully this will help other applicants. Anyway, I will tack this conversation as an opportunity to say thank you for going exta miles and helping applicants (including me) really appreciate. However, my case is straget forward. Everything is there (IMMI account). I got 2 different S56 from 2 different Case officers asking same documents which are already on IMMI account. Not sure why it's taking so long. I am almost 2 months on Further assessment. Nevertheless, this what it's. I can't complain because this is part of life - Thank you .
  20. ssiri

    The (all new) Brexit Thread

    Is this kid being hung out to protect Oakeshott, who took credit for the story and just happens to be shagging that bloke from the Brexit Party? What a bunch of traitors. Quote He is obviously pig ignorant about the role of a diplomat as well... Wouldn’t put it past Oakesh*tt (oops that’s a typo).
  21. Marisawright

    Help Choosing Visa Type

    That's a question your agent should be able to help you with, because he/she should have an idea how the points have fluctuated in recent years. Points do go up and down - if they're flooded with applicants, they'll set the threshold higher - but your agent should have some idea of the last time it dropped low enough to meet your numbers.
  22. ajs604

    6 reasons that you came to live in Australia

    Could not agree more, I used to live in the Western Suburbs and also got that feeling of depression when visiting Melton, Sunshine or Werribee.
  23. ajs604

    6 reasons that you came to live in Australia

    1. Better climate (milder winters) 2. Get away from certain family members. 3. Fed up of UK class based system (less noticeable here). 4. Better life balance. 5. A sense of adventure 6. More open spaces.
  24. Hex

    Skillselect ENS 186 Timeline

    @Amit Gupta Ahh, so it seems the difference then is between the functional (overall) and professional / superior (on each band). Learnt something new here - thanks!
  25. Amit Gupta

    Skillselect ENS 186 Timeline

    @Hex Good morning and thanks you for your helpful response and time. You really give extra effort to this form and we really appreciate it. Nevertheless, I am not MA so don't take my advice as a rule. Furthermore, when my friend try to show English evidence for his partner he submitted overall 4.5 result and he got his visa. He was confused also so MA send him legislation which is this only for Secondary applicants functional English https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/F2014L01668. Now, about your case there is a different legislation which shows exactly what is component English, professional English or superior English. In those legislations it's clearly mentioned that you should have in each. However in functional legislation it say overall. Hopefully, this sounds good. Once again I am not MA. I just try to show up what is there in sets of rules which I come across. - Thank you.
  26. Hi guys, I am a former temporary permanent resident that held subclass of 820. I moved to Australia in 2007 and applied for a spouse visa. Then my husband had a scholarship to study abroad so we both left Australia in 2010. 9 years later we are intending to move back with my family whom my spouse is an Australian citizen. What visa would I require to use and is it possible to be able to work? Would it be an RRV visa? I need substantial advice as it is a big move, especially when you have a family. Really appreciate some advice as I can't seek it anywhere else, unless you pay for an agent. Please advise Regards
  27. Multiverse76

    Help Choosing Visa Type

    Hi PIO Forum I'm seeking your help in making the decision on which Visa I should pursue. A few days ago I received a positive skills assessment by the ACS for my occupation 261112 - Systems Analyst. With a superior English Score (I still need to sit this exam), I would score: 65 points - 189 without Sponsorship 70 points - 189 with Sponsorship 75 points - 189 with Regional Nomination 70 points - 190 with Regional Nomination 75 points - 489 with Regional Nomination I am 42, from UK, ultimately seeking PR, with De Facto spouse, no kids. I notice on the latest Invitation Rounds that my occupation currently requires 85 points to get an invitation. Does this mean there is little hope and little point in continuing to apply? I should also be choosing which visa type is best suited for my application. What's your view? According to my MARA Agent, I might also be eligible for an ENS Visa. Thanks for your help!
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